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I've read that things can go wrong with your web server which may lead to display of PHP scripts as plain text files in a web browser; consequently I've moved most of my PHP scripts to a directory outside the web root. Now I've been wondering whether the same could happen to the CGI scripts in my cgi-bin.

My main concern is one script which contains a user name and password for my MySQL database. If this is a possible security hole (at least as far as the database content is concerned), is there a way of putting sensitive data in a different location and getting it from there (like saving it in a file in a different directory and reading it from that file, for example)? My scripts are written in Perl btw.

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6 Answers 6

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I've read that things can go wrong with your web server which may lead to display of PHP scripts as plain text files in a web browser; consequently I've moved most of my PHP scripts to a directory outside the web root. Now I've been wondering whether the same could happen to the CGI scripts in my cgi-bin.

Yes. If something goes wrong that causes the programs to be served instead of executed, then any of their content will be exposed. It is exactly the same issue as with PHP (except that given the way that cgi-bin directories are usually configured (i.e. aliased to a directory outside the web root), it is slightly harder for the problems to occur).

My main concern is one script which contains a user name and password for my MySQL database. If this is a possible security hole (at least as far as the database content is concerned), is there a way of putting sensitive data in a different location and getting it from there (like saving it in a file in a different directory and reading it from that file, for example)?

Yes. Exactly that, just make sure the directory is outside the webroot.

For additional security, make sure the database only accepts the credentials for connections from the minimum set of hosts that need to access it. e.g. if the database is on the same server as the web server, then only let the credentials work for localhost. Causing the database to only listen on the localhost network interface would also be a good idea in that case.

My scripts are written in Perl btw.

I'd look at using one of the Config::* modules for this.

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Dorward Thanks for the helpful info! –  canavanin Dec 1 '10 at 19:03

One concern worth mentioning is specific to shared hosting.

If you're on a host shared with other users, it may be impossible to hide the password from them. This depends on configuration details for the OS and the webserver.

For instance, it is common to have an Apache configuration on Linux on which the only way for a user offering a website to make files readable or writable to the webserver user is to make them readable/writable to all users.

You may trust all of these users not to abuse this themselves, but if one of these websites has a vulnerability that allows intruders to view the full file system, the intruder can then exploit that on all other websites.

There are countermeasures against this, but they complicate things for the users, so many hosters don't implement them.

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It is definitely a security concern. You should store the password encrypted in a separate file and make sure that only your app has access to it.

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Storing the password encrypted isn't going to be much help, since the key to decrypt it would also have to be available. As a rule of thumb, a system that checks to see if a password is correct should only store a hash of the password — but this won't work for the system that needs to offer the password. –  Quentin Dec 1 '10 at 15:42
    
Encryption is an extra security step. It's like your car alarm. It won't stop a really good thief, but will help dissuade a mediocre one. –  esmiralha Dec 1 '10 at 16:23
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Most thieves in this case would probably consider it a fun challenge to break the encryption. –  Ven'Tatsu Dec 1 '10 at 18:30

It's definitely not a good idea to hardcode a password in a script if you can avoid it. Fortunately both Postgres and MySQL support loading DB credentials from a file. For Postgres you use ~/.pgpass and for MySQL I believe it's ~/.my.cnf. In either case you would adjust the permissions so that only the user running the script has permission to read the file. The advantage of this approach is that you don't have to write the code to read the file - the DB client library does it automatically.

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If you use directory configured as cgi-bin, there is no way for file to be shown except error with Apache configuration. If you use Perl programs outside cgi-bin directories but inside site root, it may happen.

Also, you may configure DB to accept connections only from local socket, so knowing DB password would be useless.

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You've already gotten better answers than I can provide, but as a note:

It's very bad form to store passwords as plaintext, period.

In the same way it's very bad form to overwrite or delete files without asking permission. If you do it, it will bite you or your client in the butt eventually.

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