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I am trying to translate a poker game to a correct OOP model.
The basics :

class Hand
{
    Card cards[];
}
class Game
{
    Hand hands[];
}

I get games and hands from a text file. I parse the text file several times, for several reasons:

  • get somes infos (reason 1)
  • compute some stats (reason 2)
  • ...

For reason 1 I need some attributes (a1, b1) in class Hand. For reason 2, I need some other attributes (a2, b2). I think the dirty way would be :

class Hand
{
    Card cards[];
    Int a1,b1;
    Int a2,b2;
}

I would mean that some attributes are useless most of the time. So, to be cleaner, we could do:

class Hand
{
    Card cards[];
}
class HandForReason1 extends Hand
{
    Int a1,b1;
}

But I feel like using a hammer...

My question is : is there an intermediate way ? Or the hammer solution is the good one ? (in that case, what would be a correct semantic ?)

PS : design patterns welcome :-)
PS2 : strategy pattern is the hammer, isn't it?

* EDIT * Here is an application :

// Parse the file, read game infos (reason 1)  
// Hand.a2 is not needed here !
class Parser_Infos
{  
     Game game;  
     function Parse()  
     {  
          game.hands[0].a1 = ...  
     }  
 }  
// Later, parse the file and get some statistics (reason 2)  
// Hand.a1 is not needed here !
class Parser_Stats  
{  
    Game game;  
    function Parse()  
    {  
         game.hand[0].a2 = ...  
    }  
} 
share|improve this question
    
While hand formatting your post with html will more-or-less work, you'll find it easier and faster to use the markdown engine supplied by Stack Overflow. Editing help page. – dmckee Dec 1 '10 at 16:09
    
I think it will be much easier for us to grasp your problem if you use a real life example for your 'attributes'. What does a1 and b1, a2 and b2 mean exactly? – Fortega Dec 1 '10 at 16:29

Using a chain of responsibility to recognize a poker hand is what I would do. Since each hand has it's own characteristics, you can't just have a generic hand.

Something like

abstract class Hand {
   protected Hand next;

   abstract protected boolean recognizeImpl(Card cards[]);

   public Hand setNext(Hand next) {
      this.next = next;
      return next;
   }

   public boolean Hand recognize(Card cards[]) {
      boolean result = ;
      if (recognizeImpl(cards)) {
         return this;
      } else if (next != null) {
         return next.recognize(cards);
      } else {
         return null;
      }
   }
}

And then have your implementation

class FullHouse extends Hand {
    protected boolean recognizeImpl(Card cards[]) {
        //...
    }
}
class Triplet extends Hand {
    protected boolean recognizeImpl(Card cards[]) {
        //...
    }
}

Then build your chain

// chain start with "best" hand first, we want the best hand
// to be treated first, least hand last
Hand handChain = new FullHouse();
handChain
  .setNext(new Triplet())
  //.setNext(...)     /* chain method */
;

//...

Hand bestHand = handChain.recognize(cards);
if (bestHand != null) {
   // The given cards correspond best to bestHand
}

Also, with each hand it's own class, you can initialize and have then hold and compute very specific things. But since you should manipulate Hand classes as much as you can (to stay as much OO as possible), you should avoid having to cast your hands to a specific hand class.

** UPDATE **

Alright, so to answer your original question (sig) the class Hand is for manipulating and treating "hands". If you need to calculate other statistics or other needs, wrapping your Hand class might not be a good idea as you'll end up with a compound class, which is not desirable (for maintainability's sake and OOP paradigm).

For the reason 1, it is alright to have different kinds of hands, as the chain of responsibility illustrate; you can read your file, create different kinds of hands with the many parameters as is required.

For reason 2, you might look at other solutions. One would be to have your Hand classes fire events (ex: when it is recognized) and your application could register those hands into some other class to listen for events. That other class should also be responsible to collect the necessary data from the files you are reading. Since a hand is not (or should not be) responsible to collect statistical data, the bottom line is that you need to have something else handle that.

One package = coherent API and functionalities

One class = coherent functionalities (a hand is a hand, not a statistical container)

One method = a (single) functionality (if a method needs to handle more than one functionality, break those functionalities into separate private methods, and call them from the public method)

I'm giving you a generic answer here because reason 1 and reason 2 are not specific.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your answer... But, I might not have been clear because this was not my question :-) I am not trying to recognize a poker hand, I am trying to get the best way to "distribute" attributes to classes. Some attributes in class Hand are needed for computing statistics. Other attributes are needed for other stuff... I guess putting all attributes into one Hand class is quite dirty. But using inheritance seems a bit "heavy". But this might be the only way... Or is there another way to create a model ? – Antoine Dec 1 '10 at 16:23
    
@Antoine my answer was not too clear either. Read the edit for more precision. – Yanick Rochon Dec 1 '10 at 16:44
    
I'm still a bit lost but you gave me clues and rules. I am a very procedural programmer (old school) and sometimes I find difficult to model objects everywhere :-) – Antoine Dec 1 '10 at 17:20

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