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I have two tables which are set out roughly as follows:

products            product_attributes
==================  ========================================
| id | name      |  | id | product_id | attribute | value  |
==================  ========================================
| 1  | product 1 |  | 1  | 1          | size      | big    |
| 2  | product 2 |  | 2  | 1          | colour    | red    |
| 3  | product 3 |  | 3  | 2          | size      | medium |
| 3  | product 3 |  | 4  | 2          | age_range | 3-5    |
| .. | ...       |  | 5  | 2          | colour    | blue   |
==================  | 6  | 3          | size      | small  |
                    | .. | ...        | ...       | ...    |
                    ========================================

There are potentially an infinite amount of attributes for a product which is why they are kept in a separate table.

I want to be able to pull out distinct products which match MULTIPLE (also infinite) attribute conditions but I cant think how to do it without maybe using an OR condition and then some sort of count to check all of the attributes were matched. Im fairly sure this isnt the best way so hopefully someone can help?!

For example find products which have size = 'medium' and colour = 'blue' (this would match product 2 in the example above).

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

This is a relational division problem.

The way you suggest with the COUNT is probably the easiest in MySQL

SELECT product_id
FROM product_attributes pa
WHERE (attribute='size' and value='medium')
OR (attribute='colour' and value='blue')
GROUP BY product_id
HAVING COUNT(DISTINCT CONCAT(attribute,value) ) = 2

There is another approach with double NOT EXISTS in the linked article but as MySQL does not support CTEs that would be quite cumbersome.

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thanks, this was sort of on the lines I was thinking but I hoped there might have been a more efficient way. I know its very unlikely but am I right in thinking that DISTINCT CONCAT(attribute, value) could run into problems if I had attributes "siz" and "size" with values "esmall" and "small" respectively? I know its unlikely but Im dealing with a lot of 3rd party data so is there a way to guarantee a unique combination using the attribute ID or something for example DICTINCT(pa.id)? –  atkaye Dec 1 '10 at 16:57
    
@atkaye - Yes that would cause you a problem. I originally used COUNT(*) but edited it. Do you have a unique constraint on the column combination product_id,attribute? i.e. can a particular product only have one value for any particular attribute? –  Martin Smith Dec 1 '10 at 17:00
    
Yes there can only be a single value for an attribute. Is there a reason you removed COUNT(*)? –  atkaye Dec 1 '10 at 17:05
    
@atkaye - Because I wasn't sure whether or not there was any such constraint. If there is then count(*) will work fine. –  Martin Smith Dec 1 '10 at 17:09
    
OK thanks for your help –  atkaye Dec 1 '10 at 17:26

I think this should do the trick:

SELECT a.product_id, p.name FROM product_attributes AS a LEFT JOIN products p ON (a.product_id=p.id) WHERE (a.attribute="size" AND a.value="medium") OR (a.attribute="colour" AND a.value="blue") GROUP BY a.product_id
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thanks, same as the answer above I think but just missing the count to make sure all the conditions are matched –  atkaye Dec 1 '10 at 16:59

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