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What I have is a bunch of forms in my main application that have both private and public functions. I have a plugin architecture in place that accesses each form when it is created and loaded and holds a reference to it for updating it, adding controls, etc.

What we are trying to do is implement this plug in architecture, but some plugins may need to call a form's private functions. Here is an example of what I tried with Type.InvokeMember:

public partial class Form1 : Form
{
    Form1()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
    }

    private void SayHello()
    {
        MessageBox.Show("Hello World!");
    }
}

In another DLL...

public class PluginClass
{
    Form1 myReferencedForm1;

    PluginClass()
    {
        //Constructor code here...

        //Also sets the reference to existing Form1 instance
    }

    private CallMember()
    {
        Type t = typeof(Form1); //I guess I can also call 'myReferencedForm1.GetType();' here as well
        t.InvokeMember("SayHello",
                       System.Reflection.BindingFlags.InvokeMethod |
                       System.Reflection.BindingFlags.NonPublic |
                       System.Reflection.BindingFlags.Public,
                       null, myReferencedForm1, new object[] { });
    }
}

I have tried "SayHello" and "SayHello()" and they both return a 'MissingMethodException' error:

Method 'Form1.SayHello()' not found.

Do I need to create and use a Binder? If so how do I do that? Can I do this easier with a System.Windows.Forms.Message? If so how?

share|improve this question
    
This is a duplicate of How do I use reflection to invoke a private method in C#? –  Jason Dec 1 '10 at 18:11
    
Are these in the same dll? You could make SayHello() internal rather than private if so –  wangburger Dec 1 '10 at 18:13
    
No, they are not. I will update the code in the question. –  Mike Webb Dec 1 '10 at 18:13

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You haven't included BindingFlags.Instance in your list of flags... so it doesn't have either instance or static methods to check!

Personally I usually call GetMethod and then MethodInfo.Invoke to separate the discovery of the method from the invocation. I find that makes it easier to debug, but YMMV.

Complete sample:

using System;
using System.Reflection;

class OtherClass
{
    private void Foo()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("OtherClass.Foo");
    }
}

class Test
{
    static void Main()
    {
        OtherClass target = new OtherClass();
        typeof(OtherClass).InvokeMember("Foo",
            BindingFlags.InvokeMethod | BindingFlags.Instance |
            BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.NonPublic,
            null, target, new object[0]);
    }
}

Or using my "separate fetch from invocation":

using System;
using System.Reflection;

class OtherClass
{
    private void Foo()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("OtherClass.Foo");
    }
}

class Test
{
    static void Main()
    {
        OtherClass target = new OtherClass();
        MethodInfo method = typeof(OtherClass).GetMethod("Foo",
            BindingFlags.InvokeMethod | BindingFlags.Instance |
            BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.NonPublic);

        // Could now check for method being null etc
        method.Invoke(target, null);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I should know better... I can't beat Jon Skeet to one of these! –  Diego Mijelshon Dec 1 '10 at 18:16

Don't try that.

Create a interface: IPluginHost with DoMethod(string Name) member. Implement that interface for each form, you can even extract it to the other file using partial class declaration.

In the method impl, do simple switch case to kick proper method. Use some script to generate it.

public interface IPluginHost
{
    void DoMethod(string MethodName);
}

public partial MyForm:Form, IPluginHost
{
    #region IPluginHost implementation
    public void DoMethod(string MethodName)
    {
         switch (MethodName)
             case "SayHello":
                 SayHello();
                 break;
             ...
    }
    #endregion
}

If you are doing the architecture - don't HACK IT right at the start.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 I have to agree, why go the hard/dirty way when there's a much easier/cleaner way like this. –  Doggett Dec 1 '10 at 18:21

The invokeAttr parameter should be

BindingFlags.InvokeMethod | BindingFlags.Instance | BindingFlags.NonPublic
share|improve this answer

Change your BindingFlags to

private CallMember()
{
    Type t = typeof(Form1); //I guess I can also call 'myReferencedForm1.GetType();
    t.InvokeMember("SayHello",
                   System.Reflection.BindingFlags.InvokeMethod |
                   System.Reflection.BindingFlags.Instance |
                   System.Reflection.BindingFlags.NonPublic,
                   null, myReferencedForm1, new object[] { });
}

This should do the trick.

share|improve this answer

You forgot to add BindingFlags.Instance to the list of flags:

t.InvokeMember("SayHello", 
               BindingFlags.Intance |
                   BindingFlags.InvokeMethod |
                   BindingFlags.NonPublic,
               null, 
               myReferencedForm1,
               new object[] { });

But, to be honest, I prefer getting the method and then using the MethodInfo object returned to call the method:

if(myReferencedForm1 != null)
{
    var type = typeof(Form1);
    var method = type.GetMethod("SayHello", BindingFlags.Instance
        | BindingFlags.NonPublic);

    method.Invoke(myReferencedForm1);
}
share|improve this answer

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