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I've got a Task<T>:

Task<A> someTask = ...

This task can result in being successful, faulted or cancelled.

I want to transform the result when the task is successful, and preserve the outcome if not.

This seems to be really difficult when someTask throws an exception.

What I've tried:

Task<B> resultTask = StartMyTask().ContinueWith<B>(
    t => Foo(t.Result),
    TaskContinuationOptions.OnlyOnRanToCompletion);

This results in resultTask being cancelled if someTask faults. I want it to fault.

Task<B> resultTask = StartMyTask().ContinueWith<B>(
    t => Foo(t.Result));

This breaks into the Visual Studio debugger because .Result throws an exception. If I press F5, resultTask faults as expected, but it smells.

Is there any way to let resultTask to have the same outcome as someTask if someTask faults?


Essentially what I'm trying to do is to express something like this with tasks:

int F()
{
    throw new SomeException();
}

string G(int x)
{
    return x.ToString();
}

try
{
    string result = G(F());
}
catch (SomeException e)
{
    ...
}
share|improve this question
    
Should your question be read as: how to skip wrapping an original exception into AggregateException inside a continuation? That's not possible I beleive and it's by design. You have to get used to dealing with AggregateException in TPL, it's everywhere. Actually AggregateException has many helper methods, also see this article - msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/ee321571.aspx and this msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd997415.aspx. –  Shrike Dec 1 '10 at 21:12
    
@Shrike: It's not really the nested AggregateException that bothers me. I've rephrased the question a bit. –  dtb Dec 1 '10 at 21:27
    
relatd? stackoverflow.com/questions/8853693/… –  Ruben Bartelink Jul 27 '12 at 6:13
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5 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Task continuations are independent. They can be used to build what you want, but they're not designed specifically for that scenario.

The first question to ask is: can the relationship be viewed as a parent/child relationship (e.g., Foo would be the parent of StartMyTask)? If this makes sense, then you may be able to take advantage of the state propogation from child to parent.

If treating Foo as a "parent" and StartMyTask as a "child" doesn't work design-wise, then there are few other options. Continuations are a bit low-level for what you need (remember, they're just "run this task when that other task completes").

It sounds like you may be trying to do something more like a "pipeline". Currently, Rx is more suitable for this kind of thing.

Task-based pipelines aren't really here yet. The ParallelExtensionsExtras library has a Task-based Pipeline class, and the Async CTP has a TPL Dataflow library, but both of these are under-developed at present. (e.g., Pipeline insists on running each stage of the pipeline in a separate thread, and Dataflow has no mechanism for automatically propogating exceptions or even completion).

So, if you can't use Rx, then I would write my own "PipelineTransform" extension method for a Task and use an explicit TCS to handle all three completion situations correctly.

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1  
Rx is indeed where I'm coming from, and I'm deeply frustrated by the fact that tasks aren't anywhere as composable as IObservables. Unfortunately I can't use Rx in this project. Async CTP would solve the problem elegantly async Task<B> DoIt() { return Foo(await StartSomeTask()); } but I can't use that as well. Can you show how that PipelineTransform method would look like? –  dtb Dec 1 '10 at 19:53
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I suspect the original exception will be in the AggregateException within the AggregateException if you see what I mean - you just need to unwrap twice, or call AggregateException.Flatten() on the outer AggregateException.

share|improve this answer
    
Right, Flatten does the trick. But VS still annoys me with the new AggregateException. Do I really need to disable the AggregateException in the debugger or is there any other way? –  dtb Dec 1 '10 at 18:22
    
Well, you could make your continuation test for the task being faulted, and perform the unwrapping itself. If you need to do this often, you could do it in an extension method with took another action and wrapped it. –  Jon Skeet Dec 1 '10 at 18:25
    
If I replace t => Foo(t.Result) with t => { if (t.IsFaulted) throw t.Exception; return Foo(t.Result); } then VS still breaks into the debugger every time my code hits exception ("exception unhandled by user-code"). I'm really wondering why the TPL designers decided to cancel the continuation instead of faulting it... –  dtb Dec 1 '10 at 18:31
    
@dtb: Where is it throwing the exception though? Presumably not at t.Result –  Jon Skeet Dec 1 '10 at 19:20
    
If you don't specify OnlyOnRanToCompletion then the continuation will run in all cases. If the continuation is t => Foo(t.Result) and t is faulted, then t.Result will throw t.Exception (and the debugger breaks unless I untick "User-unhandled" for AggregateException in Debug > Exceptions). –  dtb Dec 1 '10 at 19:25
show 4 more comments

This seems to work and is probably similar to the "PipelineTransform" suggested by @Stephen Cleary.

Task<B> resultTask = StartMyTask().ContinueWith<Task<B>>(task =>
{
    var tcs = new TaskCompletionSource<B>();

    switch (task.Status)
    {
    case TaskStatus.Canceled:
        tcs.SetCanceled();
        break;

    case TaskStatus.Faulted:
        tcs.SetException(task.Exception);
        break;

    case TaskStatus.RanToCompletion:
        tcs.SetResult(Foo(task.Result));
        break;
    }

    return tcs.Task;
}).Unwrap();
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1  
Yup. That's pretty much what I was thinking - just make an extension method passing Foo as a Func<TInput, TOutput> parameter. –  Stephen Cleary Dec 2 '10 at 4:00
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In order to make Task<B> fully preserve the exception state of the original task, we can change the switch case in dtb's answer to

    case TaskStatus.Faulted:
        tcs.SetException(task.Exception.InnerExceptions);
        break;

(Note that this is "InnerExceptions", with an 's'.)

This avoids the nested AggregateException problem.

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When you check Task's result you always get AggregateException. If your error handling code can be separated from main code then you could use kind of a AOP approach, PostSharp for an instance:

[ErrorHandling]
public void doWord()
{
    string result = G(F());
}

where ErrorHandling is:

[AttributeUsage(AttributeTargets.Method | AttributeTargets.Property, Inherited = true, AllowMultiple = false)]
[MulticastAttributeUsage(
    MulticastTargets.Method,
    Inheritance = MulticastInheritance.Multicast,
    AllowMultiple = false)]
     public sealed class ErrorHandlingAttribute : OnMethodBoundaryAspect
     {
         public override void OnException(MethodExecutionArgs args)
         {
             base.OnException(args);
             Exception ex = args.Exception;
             AggregateException ae;
             if ((ae = ex as AggregateException) !=null)
                 ex = ae.InnerExceptions[0];

             // your error handling logic
         }
     }

I understand this can be seemed as overkill, but it's just an idea.

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