Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Can anyone please explain why this compiles and why does t end up with type int&?

#include <utility>

void f(int& r)
{
    ++r;
}

template <typename Fun, typename T>
void g(Fun fun, T&& t) 
{ 
    fun(std::forward<T>(t)); 
}

int main()
{
    int i = 0;

    g(f, i);
}

I see this on GCC 4.5.0 20100604 and GDB 7.2-60.2

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 17 down vote accepted

Because of perfect forwarding, when the argument to P&& is an lvalue, then P will be deduced to the argument's type plus having a & attached. So you get int & && with P being int&. If the argument is an rvalue then P will be deduced to only the argument's type, so you would get an int&& argument with P being int if you would pass, for example 0 directly.

int& && will collapse to int& (this is a semantic view - syntactically int& && is illegal. But saying U && when U is a template parameter or a typedef refering to a type int&, then U&& is still the type int& - i.e the two references "collapse" to one lvalue reference). That's why t has type int&.

share|improve this answer
    
@Charles, thanks. fixed –  Johannes Schaub - litb Dec 1 '10 at 18:41
    
Oh crap, this complicates using r-value references a ton. So I need to write templated code so it will work for both r-value and l-value references? :-/ –  Let_Me_Be Dec 1 '10 at 18:45
    
@Let: Well, you are forwarding correctly, so what's the problem? –  FredOverflow Dec 1 '10 at 21:51
    
@Fred The problem is that this code won't work for r-value references (and temporaries), even though the interface provides an r-value reference. –  Let_Me_Be Dec 1 '10 at 21:57
1  
@Let: No, g(f, 10) does not call f(10), that would be impossible since int& does not bind to rvalues such as 10. Since 10 is an rvalue, T&& is deduced to be int&&, and hence t is bound to a temporary object that is initialized to 10. t itself, like all other names, is an lvalue, and as such it can be bound to int& r. The modification ++r can be observed in g, simply print t to the console and you will see it. A name is always an lvalue, even if is the name of an rvalue reference. Does that clear things up? –  FredOverflow Dec 1 '10 at 22:24

If for some reason you really want to bind to lvalues or rvalues specifically, use metaprogramming:

#include <type_traits>

template <typename T>
typename std::enable_if<std::is_lvalue_reference<T&&>::value, void>::type
fun(T&& x)
{
    std::cout << "lvalue argument\n";
}

template <typename T>
typename std::enable_if<std::is_rvalue_reference<T&&>::value, void>::type
fun(T&& x)
{
    std::cout << "rvalue argument\n";
}

int main()
{
    int i = 42;
    fun(i);
    fun(42);
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.