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I have got a array in this format:

array(
    array('id' => 1, 'parent_id' => null, 'name' => 'lorem ipsum'),
    array('id' => 2, 'parent_id' => 1, 'name' => 'lorem ipsum1'),
    array('id' => 3, 'parent_id' => 1, 'name' => 'lorem ipsum2'),
    array('id' => 4, 'parent_id' => 2, 'name' => 'lorem ipsum3'),
    array('id' => 5, 'parent_id' => 3, 'name' => 'lorem ipsum4'),
    array('id' => 6, 'parent_id' => null, 'name' => 'lorem ipsum5'),
);

I have to convert this array to json object with this style:

var json = {  
    id: "1",  
    name: "loreim ipsum",  
    data: {},  
    children: [{  
        id: "2",  
        name: "lorem ipsum1",  
        data: {},  
        children: [{  
            id: "3",  
            name: "lorem ipsum2",  
            data: {},  
            children: [{
            ..............

How can i do this? Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
I don't get how your final data is supposed to look. In your sample data both items 1 and 6 have no parent, yet your sample output is designed as to have only a singe root element. –  Peter Bailey Dec 1 '10 at 20:35
    
JSON can have multiple root elements, the result is just example. –  cnkt Dec 1 '10 at 20:37
1  
No - not in the way you're defining it here. "Root element" is just something conceptual here anyway. You can't do this var json = {"id":1, "id": 6}; and get what you want, because you'll just end up with {"id": 6}. However, if your "root" was an array (and not an object), then that would work - i.e., var json = [{"id": 1}, {"id": 6}] –  Peter Bailey Dec 1 '10 at 20:43

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

My solution:

$data = array(
    array('id' => 1, 'parent_id' => null, 'name' => 'lorem ipsum'),
    array('id' => 2, 'parent_id' => 1, 'name' => 'lorem ipsum1'),
    array('id' => 3, 'parent_id' => 1, 'name' => 'lorem ipsum2'),
    array('id' => 4, 'parent_id' => 2, 'name' => 'lorem ipsum3'),
    array('id' => 5, 'parent_id' => 3, 'name' => 'lorem ipsum4'),
    array('id' => 6, 'parent_id' => null, 'name' => 'lorem ipsum5'),
);

$itemsByReference = array();

// Build array of item references:
foreach($data as $key => &$item) {
   $itemsByReference[$item['id']] = &$item;
   // Children array:
   $itemsByReference[$item['id']]['children'] = array();
   // Empty data class (so that json_encode adds "data: {}" ) 
   $itemsByReference[$item['id']]['data'] = new StdClass();
}

// Set items as children of the relevant parent item.
foreach($data as $key => &$item)
   if($item['parent_id'] && isset($itemsByReference[$item['parent_id']]))
      $itemsByReference [$item['parent_id']]['children'][] = &$item;

// Remove items that were added to parents elsewhere:
foreach($data as $key => &$item) {
   if($item['parent_id'] && isset($itemsByReference[$item['parent_id']]))
      unset($data[$key]);
}

// Encode:
$json = json_encode($data);
share|improve this answer
    
It just works. Thanks. –  cnkt Dec 1 '10 at 20:45

Here's code to do what you need. It does not need the items to be in parent-children order in the array, but will finish faster if they are.

Please study the comments to understand what the code is doing and why; and if you still have questions, ask them too!

// Assume your array is $data

$root = new stdClass; // this is your root item
$objectMap = array(); // this holds objects indexed by their id

// Since we need to iterate over the array, but there may be no guarantee
// that an item's parent will be always encountered before the item itself,
// we loop as many times as needed, skipping items whose parent we have not
// yet seen. Hopefully we will see it later and be able to process these
// items in the next iteration.
while (!empty($data)) {

    // Remember how many items there are when starting the loop
    $count = count($data);

    // Do the actual work!
    foreach ($data as $key => $row) {
        $parentId = $row['parent_id'];

        if ($parentId === null) {
            // We just met the root element
            $current = $root;
        }
        else if (isset($objectMap[$parentId])) {
            // We met an element with a parent that we have already seen
            $current = new stdClass;
        }
        else {
            // We met an element with an unknown parent; ignore it for now
            continue;
        }

        // Put the current element on the map so that its children will
        // be able to find it when we meet them
        $objectMap[$row['id']] = $current;

        // Add the item to its parent's children array
        $objectMap[$parentId]->children[] = $current;

        // Set the item's properties
        $current->id = $row['id'];
        $current->name = $row['name'];
        $current->data = new stdClass; // always empty
        $current->children = array();

        // We successfully processed this, remove it (see why below!)
        unset($data[$key]);
    }

    // OK, we looped over the array once. If the number of items has
    // not been reduced at all, it means that the array contains only
    // items whose parents do not exist. Instead of looping forever,
    // let's just take what we are given and stop here.
    if ($count == count($data)) {
        break;
    }

    // If there are still items in $data, we will now iterate again
    // in the hope of being able to process them in the next iteration
}

// All set! If $data is not empty now, it means there were items
// with invalid parent_ids to begin with.
$output = json_encode($root);
share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't work for me - even after fixing the bug on line 38 $objectMap[$parentId]->children[] = $current; –  Peter Bailey Dec 1 '10 at 20:32
    
Doesn't work for me too. –  cnkt Dec 1 '10 at 20:35
    
Fixed silly errors on line 38 (it's an object, not an array) and line 35 (setting $current = new stdClass, leftover from a refactoring). Works now, thanks for pointing out the errors. –  Jon Dec 2 '10 at 14:19

My take (I know an answer has been accepted, but I worked on this so I'm gonna post id =P)

// Test data
$data = array(
    array('id' => 1, 'parent_id' => null, 'name' => 'lorem ipsum'),
    array('id' => 2, 'parent_id' => 1, 'name' => 'lorem ipsum1'),
    array('id' => 3, 'parent_id' => 1, 'name' => 'lorem ipsum2'),
    array('id' => 4, 'parent_id' => 2, 'name' => 'lorem ipsum3'),
    array('id' => 5, 'parent_id' => 3, 'name' => 'lorem ipsum4'),
    array('id' => 6, 'parent_id' => null, 'name' => 'lorem ipsum5'),
);

// Randomize, because the data may not be in a top-down order
shuffle( $data );

// Parse and inspect the result
$builder = new TreeBuilder( $data );
echo '<pre>', print_r( $builder->getTree() ), '</pre>';


class TreeBuilder
{
  protected $leafIndex = array();
  protected $tree      = array();
  protected $stack;

  function __construct( $data )
  {
    $this->stack = $data;

    while( count( $this->stack ) )
    {
      $this->branchify( array_shift( $this->stack ) );
    }
  }

  protected function branchify( &$leaf )
  {
    // Root-level leaf?
    if ( null === $leaf['parent_id'] )
    {
      $this->addLeaf( $this->tree, $leaf );
    }
    // Have we found this leaf's parent yet?
    else if ( isset( $this->leafIndex[$leaf['parent_id']] ) )
    {
      $this->addLeaf( $this->leafIndex[$leaf['parent_id']]['children'], $leaf );
    } else {
      // Nope, put it back on the stack
      $this->stack[] = $leaf;
    }
  }

  protected function addLeaf( &$branch, $leaf )
  {
    // Add the leaf to the branch
    $branch[] = array(
        'id'       => $leaf['id']
      , 'name'     => $leaf['name']
      , 'data'     => new stdClass
      , 'children' => array()
    );

    // Store a reference so we can do an O(1) lookup later
    $this->leafIndex[$leaf['id']] = &$branch[count($branch)-1];
  }

  protected function addChild( $branch, $leaf )
  {
    $this->leafIndex[$leaf['id']] &= $branch['children'][] = $leaf;
  }

  public function getTree()
  {
    return $this->tree;
  }
}
share|improve this answer

protected by Community Jan 6 at 7:02

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