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I have a class that can be called either from a GUI or form a Non-Graphical Environment (Batch mode)

What is the most convenient an best practice way to "tell" the GUI-related parts of the code NOT to execute when executed in batch mode.

I think of something like

    public MyMethod()
    {            
        [@TAG: DOTHIS_ONLY_IF_GUIMODE]
        ShowPanels();
        ....
    }

And the GUI_MODE_ACTIVATED would be set to true or false on runtime somewhere, depending on where the program is called from

I want to avoid the ugly tracing if/else stuff scattered all over my code.
My little thumb tells me AOP is the way to go (but if I manage to find a simpler alternative I'll go for it)
So, what is the SIMPLEST and most straightforward way to do this ?

Update: As most contributors pointed out, separating GUI Code from Business code is a rule of thumb, But I am still interested in knowing ways to do this even if NO GUI is involved (ie, two different BATCH modes for two different environments, for example)

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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I think your best bet is to take the GUI-specific code out of the class and implement events triggered at key times in the class's processing. When called by the GUI, the GUI code subscribes to those events and 'does the right thing.' The batch-code ignores the events and all is well.

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Perfect ! I was already doing that somehow (ShowPanels method actually just fires an event) but for some reason I still get a NullPointer Exception when I do not subscribe to that Event in batch mode so that made me doubt of the validity of that option. I'll check my code more closely. –  Mehdi LAMRANI Dec 1 '10 at 20:37
1  
Check event for null before calling it –  n8wrl Dec 1 '10 at 20:39
1  
This is exactly what I was thinking to suggest. –  mlibby Dec 1 '10 at 20:42
    
You Got it Right ! Damn, I was tricked by the default call of the event (which was -until now, always subscribed to) ! Many Thanks... –  Mehdi LAMRANI Dec 1 '10 at 20:51

What is the most convenient an best practice way to "tell" the GUI-related parts of the code NOT to execute when executed in batch mode.

This is why you separate business logic concerns from UI concerns.

So, what is the SIMPLEST and most straightforward way to do this ?

Separate business logic concerns from UI concerns.

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I Know that, But I Have no real choice, I have legacy code I MUST cope with it. –  Mehdi LAMRANI Dec 1 '10 at 20:30
    
@Mika Jacobi: What you do mean you don't have a choice? You're obviously refactoring right now. –  Jason Dec 1 '10 at 20:32
    
It's a bit more complicated than that, the architecture of the application is quite rigid I do not master all the consequences (as that code is called by other applications that are out of my scope for the time being) so I prefer to be cautious. –  Mehdi LAMRANI Dec 1 '10 at 20:42

The simplest and most straightforward way is to use an if statement.

A less straightforward, but more structured, way would be to make the ShowPanels method abstract, then derive two classes: one for GUI mode and one for batch mode.

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The second Idea you mentioned is interesting. The only drawback I see is that it forces me to have 2 copies of the class. –  Mehdi LAMRANI Dec 1 '10 at 20:33
    
No: the common logic (which is hopefully most of the code) lives in the base class. The derived classes only contain the logic specific to either GUI mode or batch mode. –  Tim Robinson Dec 1 '10 at 20:35
    
Oki Doki ! That is useful for my update on the post. Thanx –  Mehdi LAMRANI Dec 1 '10 at 20:53

Add Aspects to Object Using Dynamic Decorator .

Your classs should concern only business logic not presentation (GUI or Batch, etc.). At runtime, you can attach presentation (GUI or non-GUI) code to objects of the class as needed.

No need to have the ugly attribute code in your class definition.

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