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How can I do this fast?

Sure I can do this:

static bool ByteArrayCompare(byte[] a1, byte[] a2)
{
    if (a1.Length != a2.Length)
        return false;

    for (int i=0; i<a1.Length; i++)
        if (a1[i]!=a2[i])
            return false;

    return true;
}

But I'm looking for either a BCL function or some highly optimized proven way to do this.

java.util.Arrays.equals((sbyte[])(Array)a1, (sbyte[])(Array)a2);

works nicely, but it doesn't look like that would work for x64.

Note my super-fast answer here.

share|improve this question
1  
"This kinda counts on the fact that the arrays start qword aligned." That's a big if. You should fix the code to reflect that. – Joe Chung Aug 9 '09 at 20:45
    
return a1.Length == a2.Length && !a1.Where((t, i) => t != a2[i]).Any(); – alerya Aug 31 '12 at 12:10
    
I liked @OhadSchneider answer about IStructuralEquatable – Lijo Mar 1 '13 at 7:01

18 Answers 18

You can use Enumerable.SequenceEqual method.

using System;
using System.Linq;
...
var a1 = new int[] { 1, 2, 3};
var a2 = new int[] { 1, 2, 3};
var a3 = new int[] { 1, 2, 4};
var x = a1.SequenceEqual(a2); // true
var y = a1.SequenceEqual(a3); // false

If you can't use .NET 3.5 for some reason, your method is OK.
Compiler\run-time environment will optimize your loop so you don't need to worry about performance.

share|improve this answer
1  
I love it. Works for all collections – Sameer Alibhai Sep 1 '10 at 17:30
61  
Yes, this runs about 50x slower than the unsafe comparison. – Hafthor Feb 3 '11 at 2:53
9  
This is really raising the dead here, but slow is really a bad word to use here. 50x slower sounds bad, but it's not often you're comparing enough data for it to make a difference, and if you are, you really need to benchmark this for your own case, for a myriad of reasons. For example, note the creator of the unsafe answer notes a difference of 7x slow, as opposed to 50x slower (the unsafe method's speed also depends on the alignment of data). In the rare cases where these numbers matter, P/Invoke is even faster. – Assorted Trailmix Sep 17 '14 at 22:47
2  
So the slower implementation gets over 300 likes? I would suggest hooking the msvcrt.dll as that would be the fastest way to get the job done. – TGarrett May 14 '15 at 13:49
7  
Fastest is not the most important thing to a business. Maintainability is much "faster" than the savings on this code will amount to in 99% of cases. I am using SequenceEqual and my entire code is < 1ms. Those µs you are saving will never add up to the 5 minutes of lack of readability of P/Invoke. – PRMan Sep 25 '15 at 23:54

P/Invoke powers activate!

[DllImport("msvcrt.dll", CallingConvention=CallingConvention.Cdecl)]
static extern int memcmp(byte[] b1, byte[] b2, long count);

static bool ByteArrayCompare(byte[] b1, byte[] b2)
{
    // Validate buffers are the same length.
    // This also ensures that the count does not exceed the length of either buffer.  
    return b1.Length == b2.Length && memcmp(b1, b2, b1.Length) == 0;
}
share|improve this answer
24  
P/Invoke... booo... – Andrei Rînea Dec 5 '09 at 1:45
27  
P/Invoke yaay - this proved to be fastest by far on bitmaps at least: stackoverflow.com/questions/2031217/… – Erik Forbes Jan 10 '10 at 20:48
20  
Pinning is not necessary in this case. The marshaller performs automatic pinning when calling native code with PInvoke. Reference: stackoverflow.com/questions/2218444/… – Mark Glasgow Mar 16 '10 at 8:55
8  
P/Invoke may elicit boos but it is by far the fastest of all the solutions presented, including an implementation I came up with that uses unsafe pointer-sized comparisons. There are a few optimizations you can make though before calling out to native code including reference equality and comparing the first and last elements. – Josh Sep 1 '11 at 19:44
24  
Why the boo? Poster wanted a fast implementation and an optimized assembly language compare can't be beat. I don't know how to get a "REPE CMPSD" out of .NET without P/INVOKE. – Jason Goemaat Oct 2 '11 at 6:55

There's a new built-in solution for this in .NET 4 - IStructuralEquatable

static bool ByteArrayCompare(byte[] a1, byte[] a2) 
{
    return StructuralComparisons.StructuralEqualityComparer.Equals(a1, a2);
}
share|improve this answer
2  
Thanks a lot, exactly what I was looking for! – Raphlo Mar 17 '12 at 0:29
13  
According to this blog post that's actually very slow. – Matt Johnson Dec 17 '12 at 23:23
29  
Crazy slow. About 180x slower than simple for loop. – Hafthor Dec 21 '12 at 5:47
    
This works, but I don't understand why. A byte[] is a primitive type that doesn't implement the IStructuralEquatable, so why can you cast it--and an implicit cast at that! And then the interface "Equals" method magically becomes available... where is the implementation of that method coming from? Can someone clue me in? – Josh Oct 3 '13 at 15:20
1  
@ta.speot.is Thanks, Can't argue with a one liner ! The previous solution was slightly more efficient since it saved the cast to IStructuralEquatable (an array is statically known to be IStructuralEquatable), but indeed your suggestions makes the method work for null arguments as well. – Ohad Schneider Mar 25 '14 at 11:39
up vote 51 down vote accepted

User gil suggested unsafe code which spawned this solution:

// Copyright (c) 2008-2013 Hafthor Stefansson
// Distributed under the MIT/X11 software license
// Ref: http://www.opensource.org/licenses/mit-license.php.
static unsafe bool UnsafeCompare(byte[] a1, byte[] a2) {
  if(a1==null || a2==null || a1.Length!=a2.Length)
    return false;
  fixed (byte* p1=a1, p2=a2) {
    byte* x1=p1, x2=p2;
    int l = a1.Length;
    for (int i=0; i < l/8; i++, x1+=8, x2+=8)
      if (*((long*)x1) != *((long*)x2)) return false;
    if ((l & 4)!=0) { if (*((int*)x1)!=*((int*)x2)) return false; x1+=4; x2+=4; }
    if ((l & 2)!=0) { if (*((short*)x1)!=*((short*)x2)) return false; x1+=2; x2+=2; }
    if ((l & 1)!=0) if (*((byte*)x1) != *((byte*)x2)) return false;
    return true;
  }
}

which does 64-bit based comparison for as much of the array as possible. This kind of counts on the fact that the arrays start qword aligned. It'll work if not qword aligned, just not as fast as if it were.

It performs about seven timers faster than the simple for loop. Using the J# library performed equivalently to the original for loop. Using .SequenceEqual runs around seven times slower; I think just because it is using IEnumerator.MoveNext. I imagine LINQ-based solutions being at least that slow or worse.

share|improve this answer
3  
Nice solution. But one (small) hint: A compare if references a1 and a2 are equal may speed up things if one gives the same array for a1 and b1. – mmmmmmmm Dec 20 '12 at 13:34
9  
New test data on .NET 4 x64 release: IStructualEquatable.equals ~180x slower, SequenceEqual 15x slower, SHA1 hash compare 11x slower, bitconverter ~same, unsafe 7x faster, pinvoke 11x faster. Pretty cool that unsafe is only a little bit slower than P/Invoke on memcmp. – Hafthor Dec 21 '12 at 5:46
3  
This link gives good detail about why memory alignment matters ibm.com/developerworks/library/pa-dalign - so, an optimization could be to check alignment and if both arrays are off alignment by the same amount, do byte compares until they are both on a qword boundary. – Hafthor Jan 10 '13 at 16:28
4  
wouldnt this give false when both a1 and a2 are null? – nawfal Apr 14 '13 at 10:26
2  
@Robear en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Short-circuit_evaluation – Hafthor Sep 25 '13 at 15:47

If you are not opposed to doing it, you can import the J# assembly "vjslib.dll" and use its Arrays.equals(byte[], byte[]) method...

Don't blame me if someone laughs at you though...


EDIT: For what little it is worth, I used Reflector to disassemble the code for that, and here is what it looks like:

public static bool equals(sbyte[] a1, sbyte[] a2)
{
  if (a1 == a2)
  {
    return true;
  }
  if ((a1 != null) && (a2 != null))
  {
    if (a1.Length != a2.Length)
    {
      return false;
    }
    for (int i = 0; i < a1.Length; i++)
    {
      if (a1[i] != a2[i])
      {
        return false;
      }
    }
    return true;
  }
  return false;
}
share|improve this answer

.NET 3.5 and newer have a new public type, System.Data.Linq.Binary that encapsulates byte[]. It implements IEquatable<Binary> that (in effect) compares two byte arrays. Note that System.Data.Linq.Binary also has implicit conversion operator from byte[].

MSDN documentation:System.Data.Linq.Binary

Reflector decompile of the Equals method:

private bool EqualsTo(Binary binary)
{
    if (this != binary)
    {
        if (binary == null)
        {
            return false;
        }
        if (this.bytes.Length != binary.bytes.Length)
        {
            return false;
        }
        if (this.hashCode != binary.hashCode)
        {
            return false;
        }
        int index = 0;
        int length = this.bytes.Length;
        while (index < length)
        {
            if (this.bytes[index] != binary.bytes[index])
            {
                return false;
            }
            index++;
        }
    }
    return true;
}

Interesting twist is that they only proceed to byte-by-byte comparison loop if hashes of the two Binary objects are the same. This, however, comes at the cost of computing the hash in constructor of Binary objects (by traversing the array with for loop :-) ).

The above implementation means that in the worst case you may have to traverse the arrays three times: first to compute hash of array1, then to compute hash of array2 and finally (because this is the worst case scenario, lengths and hashes equal) to compare bytes in array1 with bytes in array 2.

Overall, even though System.Data.Linq.Binary is built into BCL, I don't think it is the fastest way to compare two byte arrays :-|.

share|improve this answer
 using System.Linq; //SequenceEqual

 byte[] ByteArray1 = null;
 byte[] ByteArray2 = null;

 ByteArray1 = MyFunct1();
 ByteArray2 = MyFunct2();

 if (ByteArray1.SequenceEqual<byte>(ByteArray2) == true)
 {
    MessageBox.Show("Match");
 }
 else
 {
   MessageBox.Show("Don't match");
 }
share|improve this answer
1  
That's what I've been using. But it umm... sounds like a sequential comparison you'd otherwise do using a simple loop, hence not very fast. It'd be nice to reflect it and see what's actually doing. Judging by the name, it's nothing fancy. – Sergey Akopov Jan 6 '11 at 20:33
1  
Yes, but already mentioned in the accepted answer. btw, you could remove the type specification there. – nawfal Jun 2 '13 at 15:19

I would use unsafe code and run the for loop comparing Int32 pointers.

Maybe you should also consider checking the arrays to be non-null.

share|improve this answer

If you look at how .NET does string.Equals, you see that it uses a private method called EqualsHelper which has an "unsafe" pointer implementation. .NET Reflector is your friend to see how things are done internally.

This can be used as a template for byte array comparison which I did an implementation on in blog post Fast byte array comparison in C#. I also did some rudimentary benchmarks to see when a safe implementation is faster than the unsafe.

That said, unless you really need killer performance, I'd go for a simple fr loop comparison.

share|improve this answer

The short answer is this:

    public bool Compare(byte[] b1, byte[] b2)
    {
        return Encoding.ASCII.GetString(b1) == Encoding.ASCII.GetString(b2);
    }

In such a way you can use the optimized .NET string compare to make a byte array compare without the need to write unsafe code. This is how it is done in the background:

private unsafe static bool EqualsHelper(String strA, String strB)
{
    Contract.Requires(strA != null);
    Contract.Requires(strB != null);
    Contract.Requires(strA.Length == strB.Length);

    int length = strA.Length;

    fixed (char* ap = &strA.m_firstChar) fixed (char* bp = &strB.m_firstChar)
    {
        char* a = ap;
        char* b = bp;

        // Unroll the loop

        #if AMD64
            // For the AMD64 bit platform we unroll by 12 and
            // check three qwords at a time. This is less code
            // than the 32 bit case and is shorter
            // pathlength.

            while (length >= 12)
            {
                if (*(long*)a     != *(long*)b)     return false;
                if (*(long*)(a+4) != *(long*)(b+4)) return false;
                if (*(long*)(a+8) != *(long*)(b+8)) return false;
                a += 12; b += 12; length -= 12;
            }
       #else
           while (length >= 10)
           {
               if (*(int*)a != *(int*)b) return false;
               if (*(int*)(a+2) != *(int*)(b+2)) return false;
               if (*(int*)(a+4) != *(int*)(b+4)) return false;
               if (*(int*)(a+6) != *(int*)(b+6)) return false;
               if (*(int*)(a+8) != *(int*)(b+8)) return false;
               a += 10; b += 10; length -= 10;
           }
       #endif

        // This depends on the fact that the String objects are
        // always zero terminated and that the terminating zero is not included
        // in the length. For odd string sizes, the last compare will include
        // the zero terminator.
        while (length > 0)
        {
            if (*(int*)a != *(int*)b) break;
            a += 2; b += 2; length -= 2;
        }

        return (length <= 0);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
In my tests, the conversion to a string destroys the advantage of the faster compare. This was about 2.5 times slower than a simple for loop. – Doug Clutter Jul 15 '15 at 15:06
    
When i did the same the simple for was about 8 times slower. Can you write your code here? – Alon Jul 16 '15 at 15:55
1  
Will this break if a byte contains a null (0) value? – Joseph Lennox Sep 22 '15 at 16:52

I posted a similar question about checking if byte[] is full of zeroes. (SIMD code was beaten so I removed it from this answer.) Here is fastest code from my comparisons:

static unsafe bool EqualBytesLongUnrolled (byte[] data1, byte[] data2)
{
    if (data1 == data2)
        return true;
    if (data1.Length != data2.Length)
        return false;

    fixed (byte* bytes1 = data1, bytes2 = data2) {
        int len = data1.Length;
        int rem = len % (sizeof(long) * 16);
        long* b1 = (long*)bytes1;
        long* b2 = (long*)bytes2;
        long* e1 = (long*)(bytes1 + len - rem);

        while (b1 < e1) {
            if (*(b1) != *(b2) || *(b1 + 1) != *(b2 + 1) || 
                *(b1 + 2) != *(b2 + 2) || *(b1 + 3) != *(b2 + 3) ||
                *(b1 + 4) != *(b2 + 4) || *(b1 + 5) != *(b2 + 5) || 
                *(b1 + 6) != *(b2 + 6) || *(b1 + 7) != *(b2 + 7) ||
                *(b1 + 8) != *(b2 + 8) || *(b1 + 9) != *(b2 + 9) || 
                *(b1 + 10) != *(b2 + 10) || *(b1 + 11) != *(b2 + 11) ||
                *(b1 + 12) != *(b2 + 12) || *(b1 + 13) != *(b2 + 13) || 
                *(b1 + 14) != *(b2 + 14) || *(b1 + 15) != *(b2 + 15))
                return false;
            b1 += 16;
            b2 += 16;
        }

        for (int i = 0; i < rem; i++)
            if (data1 [len - 1 - i] != data2 [len - 1 - i])
                return false;

        return true;
    }
}

Measured on two 256MB byte arrays:

UnsafeCompare                           : 86,8784 ms
EqualBytesSimd                          : 71,5125 ms
EqualBytesSimdUnrolled                  : 73,1917 ms
EqualBytesLongUnrolled                  : 39,8623 ms
share|improve this answer
    
I confirm. I also ran the tests. This is faster than the answer that uses memcmp unsafe call. – Amber de Black Nov 19 '15 at 17:31
    
@AmberdeBlack Are you sure? Did you test with tiny arrays? – Zar Shardan Mar 31 at 11:49
    
@ZarShardan Confirmed, always works. – Arek Bulski Apr 2 at 14:38
    
@ArekBulski Are you sure this is faster than memcmp, cause my testing shows otherwise? – Zar Shardan Apr 3 at 0:39

For comparing short byte arrays the following is an interesting hack:

if(myByteArray1.Length != myByteArray2.Length) return false;
if(myByteArray1.Length == 8)
   return BitConverter.ToInt64(myByteArray1, 0) == BitConverter.ToInt64(myByteArray2, 0); 
else if(myByteArray.Length == 4)
   return BitConverter.ToInt32(myByteArray2, 0) == BitConverter.ToInt32(myByteArray2, 0);

Then I would probably fall out to the solution listed in the question.

It'd be interesting to do a performance analysis of this code.

share|improve this answer
    
int i=0; for(;i<a1.Length-7;i+=8) if(BitConverter.ToInt64(a1,i)!=BitConverter.ToInt64(a2,i)) return false; for(;i<a1.Length;i++) if(a1[i]!=a2[i]) return false; return true; // a little bit slower than simple for loop. – Hafthor Dec 21 '12 at 5:49

I thought about block-transfer acceleration methods built into many graphics cards. But then you would have to copy over all the data byte-wise, so this doesn't help you much if you don't want to implement a whole portion of your logic in unmanaged and hardware-dependent code...

Another way of optimization similar to the approach shown above would be to store as much of your data as possible in a long[] rather than a byte[] right from the start, for example if you are reading it sequentially from a binary file, or if you use a memory mapped file, read in data as long[] or single long values. Then, your comparison loop will only need 1/8th of the number of iterations it would have to do for a byte[] containing the same amount of data. It is a matter of when and how often you need to compare vs. when and how often you need to access the data in a byte-by-byte manner, e.g. to use it in an API call as a parameter in a method that expects a byte[]. In the end, you only can tell if you really know the use case...

share|improve this answer
    
The accepted answer recasts the byte buffer as a long buffer and compares it as you describe. – Hafthor Dec 18 '12 at 17:18

Sorry, if you're looking for a managed way you're already doing it correctly and to my knowledge there's no built in method in the BCL for doing this.

You should add some initial null checks and then just reuse it as if it where in BCL.

share|improve this answer

Use SequenceEquals for this to comparison.

share|improve this answer
1  
This does not provide an answer to the question. To critique or request clarification from an author, leave a comment below their post - you can always comment on your own posts, and once you have sufficient reputation you will be able to comment on any post. – David Grinberg Apr 23 '15 at 19:37

Couldn't find a solution I'm completely happy with (reasonable performance, but no unsafe code/pinvoke) so I came up with this, nothing really original, but works:

    /// <summary>
    /// 
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="array1"></param>
    /// <param name="array2"></param>
    /// <param name="bytesToCompare"> 0 means compare entire arrays</param>
    /// <returns></returns>
    public static bool ArraysEqual(byte[] array1, byte[] array2, int bytesToCompare = 0)
    {
        if (array1.Length != array2.Length) return false;

        var length = (bytesToCompare == 0) ? array1.Length : bytesToCompare;
        var tailIdx = length - length % sizeof(Int64);

        //check in 8 byte chunks
        for (var i = 0; i < tailIdx; i += sizeof(Int64))
        {
            if (BitConverter.ToInt64(array1, i) != BitConverter.ToInt64(array2, i)) return false;
        }

        //check the remainder of the array, always shorter than 8 bytes
        for (var i = tailIdx; i < length; i++)
        {
            if (array1[i] != array2[i]) return false;
        }

        return true;
    }

Performance compared with some of the other solutions on this page:

Simple Loop: 19837 ticks, 1.00

*BitConverter: 4886 ticks, 4.06

UnsafeCompare: 1636 ticks, 12.12

EqualBytesLongUnrolled: 637 ticks, 31.09

P/Invoke memcmp: 369 ticks, 53.67

Tested in linqpad, 1000000 bytes identical arrays (worst case scenario), 500 iterations each.

share|improve this answer
    
yeah, I noted that in the comment of stackoverflow.com/a/1445280/4489 that my testing shows this is actually a little bit slower than the simple for loop I had in the original question. – Hafthor Mar 30 at 23:25
    
are you sure? In my testing it is 4 times faster? Nothing beats good old native code though, even with marshaling overhead. – Zar Shardan Mar 31 at 11:43

If you are looking for a very fast byte array equality comparer, I suggest you take a look at this STSdb Labs article: Byte array equality comparer. It features some of the fastest implementations for byte[] array equality comparing, which are presented, performance tested and summarized.

You can also focus on these implementations:

BigEndianByteArrayComparer - fast byte[] array comparer from left to right (BigEndian) BigEndianByteArrayEqualityComparer - - fast byte[] equality comparer from left to right (BigEndian) LittleEndianByteArrayComparer - fast byte[] array comparer from right to left (LittleEndian) LittleEndianByteArrayEqualityComparer - fast byte[] equality comparer from right to left (LittleEndian)

share|improve this answer

In case you have a huge byte array, you can compare them by converting them to string.

You can use something like

byte[] b1 = // Your array
byte[] b2 = // Your array
string s1 = Encoding.Default.GetString( b1 );
string s2 = Encoding.Default.GetString( b2 );

I have used this and I have seen a huge performance impact.

share|improve this answer
2  
This may or may not work depending on your local string encoding and which code points it supports. – LonelyPixel Mar 29 '14 at 9:46
    
But since the byte array is the independent factor here, it should not be a problem. – pratikv Jun 17 '14 at 8:24
9  
You didn't understand what an Encoding is. If an encoding does not support to map certain bytes to characters, they are not mapped correctly. Most of the time you get a question mark ('?') character instead. Then you have multiple bytes mapped to the same character and your comparison is wrong. With multi-byte encodings like UTF-8 you may even get exceptions for invalid byte sequences. Don't mix bytes and characters, they're essentially different things and as such not comparable. Often-quoted article, great read: joelonsoftware.com/articles/Unicode.html – LonelyPixel Jun 17 '14 at 12:30

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