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There is the following query results: (key1 and key2 could be any text)

id   key1     key2     value

1    fred     apple    2
2    mary     orange   10
3    fred     banana   7
4    fred     orange   4
5    sarah    melon    5
...

and I wish to store the data in a grid (maybe as an array) looping all the records like this:

         apple    orange   banana  melon
fred        2        4         7     -
mary        -        10        -     -
sarah       -        -         -     5

In PHP this would be really easy, using associative arrays:

$result['fred']['apple'] = 2;

But in javascript associative arrays like this doesn't work. After reading tons of tutorial, all I could get was this:

arr=[];
arr[1]['apple'] = 2;

but arr['fred']['apple'] = 2; doesn't work. I tried arrays of objects, but objects properties can't be free text. The more I was reading tutorials, the more I got confused...

Any idea is welcome :)

share|improve this question
    
Thanks for the replies, but I'm looping through the query results, and I wish to set the values one at a time. The example lines (taken form Matt example) var grid = {};grid['aa']['bb'] = 1; returns "Uncaught TypeError: Cannot set property 'bb' of undefined". I could be wrong, but with most of your examples I have to know the data at initialization time. –  Omiod Dec 1 '10 at 21:31
    
Just found that var grid = {}; grid['aa'] = {}; grid['aa']['bb'] = 1; works. A more complex test fails, but looks like I'm in the right path –  Omiod Dec 1 '10 at 21:45
1  
you have to initialize the sub-object first, as I mentioned in my answer. var grid = {}; grd['aa'] = {}; then you can do grid['aa']['bb'] = 1. There are many ways to check to see if the sub-object is already initialized (as mentioned in my answer), so you don't overwrite an existing object. –  Matt Dec 1 '10 at 21:45
    
updated my answer with some additional code. not sure how deep your objects are, or how you're getting your data, but hopefully will point you in the right direction –  Matt Dec 1 '10 at 21:52

5 Answers 5

up vote 58 down vote accepted

Just use a regular JavaScript object, which would 'read' the same way as your associative arrays. You have to remember to initialize them first as well.

var obj = {};

obj['fred'] = {};
if('fred' in obj ){ } // can check for the presence of 'fred'
if(obj.fred) { } // also checks for presence of 'fred'
if(obj['fred']) { } // also checks for presence of 'fred'

// The following statements would all work
obj['fred']['apples'] = 1;
obj.fred.apples = 1;
obj['fred'].apples = 1;

// or build or initialize the structure outright
var obj = { fred: { apples: 1, oranges: 2 }, alice: { lemons: 1 } };

If you're looking over values, you might have something that looks like this:

var people = ['fred', 'alice'];
var fruit = ['apples', 'lemons'];

var grid = {};
for(var i = 0; i < people.length; i++){
    var name = people[i];
    if(name in grid == false){
        grid[name] = {}; // must initialize the sub-object, otherwise will get 'undefined' errors
    }

    for(var j = 0; j < fruit.length; j++){
        var fruitName = fruit[j];
        grid[name][fruitName] = 0;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Managed to use the example on production code (a Chrome extension), and works fine. Thanks. Finally I'm getting how to handle object in JS! –  Omiod Dec 1 '10 at 22:04
1  
Can't upvote this answer enough! The part that was causing my object to continually return undefined was that I was NOT initializing the sub-object. So make sure to to do this! example: grid[name] = {}; –  Jason Pudzianowski Jan 12 '12 at 10:01

If it doesn't have to be an array, you can create a "multidimensional" JS object...

<script type="text/javascript">
var myObj = { 
    fred: { apples: 2, oranges: 4, bananas: 7, melons: 0 }, 
    mary: { apples: 0, oranges: 10, bananas: 0, melons: 0 }, 
    sarah: { apples: 0, oranges: 0, bananas: 0, melons: 5 } 
}

document.write( myObject[ 'fred' ][ 'apples' ] );
</script>
share|improve this answer
    
JSON is actually the 'stringified' format of the JavaScript object. What you have there isn't JSON, just a JavaScript object. –  Matt Dec 1 '10 at 21:10
    
Thanks, Matt. Updated the post. –  charliegriefer Dec 1 '10 at 21:14

Javascript is flexible:

var arr = {
  "fred": {"apple": 2, "orange": 4},
  "mary": {}
  //etc, etc
};

alert(arr.fred.orange);
alert(arr["fred"]["orange"]);
for (key in arr.fred)
    alert(key + ": " + arr.fred[key]);
share|improve this answer
4  
I would say the variable name 'arr' is a misnomer here, because it isn't actually an array, but an object. –  Matt Dec 1 '10 at 21:07

as I needed get all elements in a nice way I encountered this SO subject. traversing 2 dimensional associative array/object - no matter the name for me, because functionality counts

    var imgs_pl= {'offer':{'img':'wer-handwritter_03.png','left': 1,'top': 2 },
    'portfolio':{'img':'wer-handwritter_10.png','left': 1,'top': 2 },
    'special':{'img':'wer-handwritter_15.png','left': 1,'top': 2 }
    };
    for (key in imgs_pl){
        console.log(key);
        for (subkey in imgs_pl[key]){
            console.log(imgs_pl[key][subkey]);
        }//for

    }//for
share|improve this answer

Don't use an array, use an object.

      var foo = new Object();
share|improve this answer
1  
don't use a new Object(), since the Object.prototype could have weirdness attached to it; use the object literal: var foo = {}; –  Michael Paulukonis Dec 1 '10 at 21:19
    
@Michael I thought {} was just syntactic sugar for new Object(); Much like [] is short for new Array() –  Matt Dec 1 '10 at 21:22
    
from my Chrome JS console, both of these constrcuts appear identical, including their prototypes. Even adding Object.prototype.foo = function(){} appears in both. –  Matt Dec 1 '10 at 21:34
    
@Matt I think I'm wrong I was mixing that up with new Array() which should be avoided. ugh. –  Michael Paulukonis Dec 1 '10 at 21:56
1  
@Michael why should new Array() be avoided? –  Matt Dec 1 '10 at 21:57

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