Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to get my hands dirty learning DDD (by developing a sample eCommerce site with entities like Order, OrderLines, Product, Categories etc). From what I could perceive about Aggregate Root concept I thought Order class should be an aggregate root for OrderLine.

Things went fine so far, however I am confused when it define a create order flow from UI. When I want to add an order line to my order object, how should I get/create an instance of an OrderLine object:

  1. Should I hardcode the new OrderLine() statement in my UI/Service class
  2. Should I define a method with parameters like productID, quantity etc in Order class?

Also, what if I want to remove the hardcoded instantiations from the UI or the Order class using a DI. What would be the best approach for this?

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

From what I could perceive about Aggregate Root concept I thought Order class should be an aggreagrte root for OrderLine.

Yes, OrderLine's should most likely be under an Order root, since OrderLine's likely make no sense outside of a parent Order.

Should I hardcode the new OrderLine() statement in my UI/Service class

Probably not, though this is how it happens often and it is made to work. The problem, as I see it, is that object construction often happens in different contexts, and the validation constraints differ depending on that context.

Should I define a method with parameters like productID,quantity etc in Order class?

As in:

public OrderLine AddOrderLine(Product product, int Quantity ... )

This is one way to do it. Notice I used a Product class instead of a ProductId. Sometimes one is preferable to the other. I find I use both a lot for various reasons - sometimes I have the ID and there's no good reason to pull the aggregate root, sometimes I need the other root to validate the operation.

Another way I do this is to implement a custom collection for the children.

So I have:

order.OrderLines.Add(product, quantity);

This feels a little more natural or OO, and in particular if an entity root has many child collections it avoids clutter.

order.AddOrderLine(), order.AddXXX(), order.AddYYY(), order.AddZZZ()

versus

order.OrderLines.Add(), order.ZZZs.Add(), order.YYYs.Add()

Also, what if I want to remove the hardcoded instantiations from the UI or the Order class using a DI. What would be the best approach for this?

This would be a textbook case for the Factory pattern. I inject such a Factory into my custom collections to support instantiation in those Add() methods.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't think order.OrderLines.Add is more OO. There is a OO thing called encapsulation. If you have many XXXs, ZZZs, YYYs in your class, its better to redesign it (good OO design tends to have many small objects). You can google about benefits of encapsulating collections and avoiding train wrecks (fluent interfaces is the other case). –  Sergey Berezovskiy Nov 29 '11 at 11:57
add comment

You could use an OrderLine Factory to get instances of Orderlines. You would "new up" an OrderLine object in the factory with parameters passed into the factory method and then return the new instance to your Order object. Always try to isolate instantiations and dont do it in the UI. There is a question here that uses this technique.

Here is a great book you will find useful on DDD.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.