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How can I best write a query that selects 10 rows randomly from a total of 600k?

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10 Answers 10

up vote 145 down vote accepted

A great post handling several cases, from simple, to gaps, to non-uniform with gaps.

http://jan.kneschke.de/projects/mysql/order-by-rand/

For most general case, here's how you do it:

SELECT name
  FROM random AS r1 JOIN
       (SELECT (RAND() *
                     (SELECT MAX(id)
                        FROM random)) AS id)
        AS r2
 WHERE r1.id >= r2.id
 ORDER BY r1.id ASC
 LIMIT 1

This supposes that the distribution of ids is equal, and that there can be gaps in the id list. See the article for more advanced examples

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2  
I'll give that a read, thank you. –  Francisc Dec 1 '10 at 21:57
13  
Yes, if you have potentially big gaps in ID's then the chance of your lowest ID's being picked randomly is much lower than your high IDs. In fact the chance that the first ID after the biggest gap getting picked is actually the highest. Therefore this isn't random by definition. –  Luke Oliff May 21 '13 at 12:05
1  
this will only work if your ID column is sequential.... –  thevoipman Aug 3 '13 at 17:28
3  
Random requires an equal chance for any result, in my mind. ;) –  Luke Oliff Mar 12 at 21:51
3  
The full article addresses issues like unequal distributions and repeated results. –  Bradd Szonye May 8 at 21:56
SELECT column FROM table
ORDER BY RAND()
LIMIT 10
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40  
ORDER BY RAND() is relatively slow –  Mateusz Charytoniuk Nov 23 '12 at 13:48
1  
Mateusz - proof pls, SELECT words, transcription, translation, sound FROM vocabulary WHERE menu_id=$menuId ORDER BY RAND() LIMIT 10 takes 0.0010, without LIMIT 10 it took 0.0012 (in that table 3500 words). –  zeusakm Mar 1 '13 at 4:47
16  
@zeusakm 3500 words is not that much; the problem is that it explodes past a certain point because MySQL has to actually sort ALL records after reading each one; once that operation hits the hard disc you can feel the difference. –  Ja͢ck Apr 10 '13 at 7:48
2  
I don't want to repeat myself but again, that's full table scan. On large table it's very time and memory consuming and might cause creation of & operation on temporary table on disk which is very slow. –  lucek Jun 8 '13 at 8:15
2  
When I was interviewing with Facebook back in 2010, they asked me how to select a random record from a huge file of unknown size, in one reading. Once you come up with an idea, it is easy to generalize it for selecting multiple records. So yes, sorting the entire file is ridiculous. At the same time, it is very handy. I just used this approach to pick 10 random rows from a table with 1,000,000+rows. Sure, I had to wait a bit; but I just wanted to get an idea, what typical rows in this table looks like... –  osa Dec 15 '13 at 22:20

I am getting fast queries (around 0.5 seconds) with a slow cpu, selecting 10 random raws in a 400K registers MySQL database non-cached 2Gb size. See here my code: Fast selection of random rows in MySQL

<?php
$time= microtime_float();

$sql='SELECT COUNT(*) FROM pages';
$rquery= BD_Ejecutar($sql);
list($num_records)=mysql_fetch_row($rquery);
mysql_free_result($rquery);

$sql="SELECT id FROM pages WHERE RAND()*$num_records<20
   ORDER BY RAND() LIMIT 0,10";
$rquery= BD_Ejecutar($sql);
while(list($id)=mysql_fetch_row($rquery)){
    if($id_in) $id_in.=",$id";
    else $id_in="$id";
}
mysql_free_result($rquery);

$sql="SELECT id,url FROM pages WHERE id IN($id_in)";
$rquery= BD_Ejecutar($sql);
while(list($id,$url)=mysql_fetch_row($rquery)){
    logger("$id, $url",1);
}
mysql_free_result($rquery);

$time= microtime_float()-$time;

logger("num_records=$num_records",1);
logger("$id_in",1);
logger("Time elapsed: <b>$time segundos</b>",1);
?>
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6  
You should post your code here, so that your answer is relevant when your link becomes broken over time. –  Brad Jan 26 '13 at 8:32
1  
Given my over 14 million records table, this is as slow as ORDER BY RAND() –  Fabrizio Apr 28 at 19:00

How to select random rows from a table:

From here: Select random rows in MySQL

A quick improvement over "table scan" is to use the index to pick up random ids.

SELECT *
FROM random, (
        SELECT id AS sid
        FROM random
        ORDER BY RAND( )
        LIMIT 10
    ) tmp
WHERE random.id = tmp.sid;
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Well if you have no gaps in your keys and they are all numeric you can calculate random numbers and select those lines. but this will probably not be the case. So one solution would be the following:

SELECT * FROM table WHERE key >= FLOOR(RAND()*MAX(id)) LIMIT 1

which will basically ensure that you get a random number int he range of your keys and then you select the next best which is greater. you ahve to do this 10 times.

however this is NOT really reandom because your keys will mist likely not be distributed evenly.

its really a big problem and not easy to solve fullfilling all the requirements, mysqls rand() is the best youc an get if you really want 10 random rows.

there is however a nother solution which is fast but also has a tradoff when it comes to randomness, but may suit you better. read about it here: How can i optimize MySQL's ORDER BY RAND() function?

question is how random do you need it to be.

can you explain a bit more so i can give you a good solution.

for example a company i worked with had a solution where they needed absolute randomness extremely fast. they ended up with pre populating the database with random values that were selected descending and set to different random values afterwards again.

if you hardly ever update you could also fill an incrementing id so you have no gaps and just can calculate random keys before selecting... it depends on the use case!

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Hi Joe. In this particular case keys should not lack gaps, but over time this may change. And while your answer works, it will generate the random 10 rows (provided I write limit 10) that are consecutive and I wanted more randomness so to speak. :) Thank you. –  Francisc Dec 1 '10 at 21:57
    
If you need 10 use some sort of union to generate 10 unique rows. –  johno Dec 1 '10 at 22:00
    
tahts what i said. you need to execute that 10 times. combining it wition union is one way to put it in one query. see my addendum 2 mins ago. –  The Surrican Dec 1 '10 at 22:04

I used this http://jan.kneschke.de/projects/mysql/order-by-rand/ posted by Riedsio (i used the case of a stored procedure that returns one or more random values):

   DROP TEMPORARY TABLE IF EXISTS rands;
      CREATE TEMPORARY TABLE rands ( rand_id INT );

    loop_me: LOOP
        IF cnt < 1 THEN
          LEAVE loop_me;
        END IF;

        INSERT INTO rands
           SELECT r1.id
             FROM random AS r1 JOIN
                  (SELECT (RAND() *
                                (SELECT MAX(id)
                                   FROM random)) AS id)
                   AS r2
            WHERE r1.id >= r2.id
            ORDER BY r1.id ASC
            LIMIT 1;

        SET cnt = cnt - 1;
      END LOOP loop_me;

In the article he solves the problem of gaps in ids causing not so random results by maintaining a table (using triggers, etc...see the article); I'm solving the problem by adding another column to the table, populated with contiguous numbers, starting from 1 (edit: this column is added to the temporary table created by the subquery at runtime, doesn't affect your permanent table):

   DROP TEMPORARY TABLE IF EXISTS rands;
      CREATE TEMPORARY TABLE rands ( rand_id INT );

    loop_me: LOOP
        IF cnt < 1 THEN
          LEAVE loop_me;
        END IF;

        SET @no_gaps_id := 0;

        INSERT INTO rands
           SELECT r1.id
             FROM (SELECT id, @no_gaps_id := @no_gaps_id + 1 AS no_gaps_id FROM random) AS r1 JOIN
                  (SELECT (RAND() *
                                (SELECT COUNT(*)
                                   FROM random)) AS id)
                   AS r2
            WHERE r1.no_gaps_id >= r2.id
            ORDER BY r1.no_gaps_id ASC
            LIMIT 1;

        SET cnt = cnt - 1;
      END LOOP loop_me;

In the article i can see he went to great lengths to optimize the code; i have no ideea if/how much my changes impact the performance but works very well for me.

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Thanks, Bogdan. –  Francisc Aug 28 '12 at 18:11

This is how I do it:

select * 
from table_with_600k_rows
where rand() < 10/600000
limit 10

I like it because does not require other tables, it is simple to write, and it is very fast to execute.

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That's full table scan and it does not use any indexes. For large tables and busy environment that's big no no. –  lucek Jun 8 '13 at 8:12

How about using MySQLi prepared statements?

<?php
// $amount_of_rows needs to have a value that is <= rows in the table
for(i=0; i==10; i++) {
    $id=mt_rand(1, $amount_of_rows);
    $con = mysqli_connect("localhost", "user", "password", "db");
    $stmt = $con -> prepare("SELECT whatever FROM table WHERE id=?");
    $stmt -> bind_param('i', );
    $stmt -> execute();
    $stmt -> bind_result($random[i]);
    $stmt -> fetch();
    $stmt -> close();
}
?>

Now variable "whatever" from ten pseudorandom rows is put into array $random.

Of course, as you can see, you'd have to know the amount of rows in the table first, and I'm not sure if this is the fastest possible method. Still, it'd work (and would be at least faster than using ordinary non-prepared MySQL statements), and it's super simple :)

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If you have just one Read-Request

Combine the answer of @redsio with a temp-table (600K is not that much):

DROP TEMPORARY TABLE IF EXISTS tmp_randorder;
CREATE TABLE tmp_randorder (id int(11) not null auto_increment primary key, data_id int(11));
INSERT INTO tmp_randorder (data_id) select id from datatable;

And then take a version of @redsios Answer:

SELECT dt.*
FROM
       (SELECT (RAND() *
                     (SELECT MAX(id)
                        FROM tmp_randorder)) AS id)
        AS rnd
 INNER JOIN tmp_randorder rndo on rndo.id between rnd.id - 10 and rnd.id + 10
 INNER JOIN datatable AS dt on dt.id = rndo.data_id
 ORDER BY abs(rndo.id - rnd.id)
 LIMIT 1;

If the table is big, you can sieve on the first part:

INSERT INTO tmp_randorder (data_id) select id from datatable where rand() < 0.01;

If you have many read-requests

  1. Version: You could keep the table tmp_randorder persistent, call it datatable_idlist. Recreate that table in certain intervals (day, hour), since it also will get holes. If your table gets really big, you could also refill holes

    select l.data_id as whole from datatable_idlist l left join datatable dt on dt.id = l.data_id where dt.id is null;

  2. Version: Give your Dataset a random_sortorder column either directly in datatable or in a persistent extra table datatable_sortorder. Index that column. Generate a Random-Value in your Application (I'll call it $rand).

    select l.*
    from datatable l 
    order by abs(random_sortorder - $rand) desc 
    limit 1;
    

This solution discriminates the 'edge rows' with the highest and the lowest random_sortorder, so rearrange them in intervals (once a day).

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I guess this is the best possible way..

SELECT id, id * RAND( ) AS random_no, first_name, last_name
FROM user
ORDER BY random_no
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2  
Hell no, that's one of worst ways to get random rows from table. That's full table scan + filesort + tmp table = bad performance. –  lucek Jun 8 '13 at 8:10
1  
When you don't want to accept the answer just say "No", you don't have to add another word that might offend another people. The are not working for you and you're not paying them. So please express some gratitude to their intention to help you. –  yogipriyo Apr 17 at 3:04
    
Besides performance, it's also far from perfectly random; you're ordering by the product of the id and a random number, rather than simply ordering by a random number, which means that rows with lower ids are going to be biased towards appearing earlier in your results set. –  Mark Amery Apr 20 at 10:49

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