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I have some code that handles an exception, and I want to do something specific only if it's a specific exception, and only in debug mode. So for example:

try:
    stuff()
except Exception as e:
    if _debug and e is KeyboardInterrupt:
        sys.exit()
    logging.exception("Normal handling")

As such, I don't want to just add a:

except KeyboardInterrupt:
    sys.exit()

because I'm trying to keep the difference in this debug code minimal

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1  
what actually do you ask? –  cldy Dec 1 '10 at 21:44

7 Answers 7

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Well, really, you probably should keep the handler for KeyboardInterrupt separated. Why would you only want to handle keyboard interrupts in debug mode, but swallow them otherwise?

That said, you can use isinstance to check the type of an object:

try:
    stuff()
except Exception as e:
    if _debug and isinstance(e, KeyboardInterrupt):
        sys.exit()
    logger.exception("Normal handling")
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This is on an embedded system running without a shell. So we could only possibly get a keyboard interrupt in debug mode. So we just handle all exceptions. –  Falmarri Dec 1 '10 at 21:52
    
isinstance. that's what I'm looking for. thx –  Falmarri Dec 1 '10 at 22:18

This is pretty much the way it's done.

try:
    stuff()
except KeyboardInterrupt:
    if _debug:
        sys.exit()
    logging.exception("Normal handling")
except Exception as e:
    logging.exception("Normal handling")

There's minimal repetition. Not zero, however, but minimal.

If the "normal handling" is more than one line of code, you can define a function to avoid repetition of the two lines of code.

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You beat me by 30 seconds, I think –  Velociraptors Dec 1 '10 at 21:49
    
It's "except Exception, e:" –  marcog Dec 1 '10 at 21:52
5  
@marcog: except Exception as e is valid in Python 2.6+. –  mipadi Dec 1 '10 at 21:54
    
@mipadi Okay, didn't know that, thanks –  marcog Dec 1 '10 at 21:55

You should let KeyboardInterrupt bubble all the way up and trap it at the highest level.

if __name__ == '__main__':
    try:
        main()
    except KeyboardInterrupt:
        sys.exit()
    except:
        pass

def main():
    try:
        stuff()
    except Exception as e:
        logging.exception("Normal handling")
        if _debug:
            raise e
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What's wrong with

try:
    stuff()
except KeyboardInterrupt:
    if _debug:
        logging.exception("Debug handling")
        sys.exit()
    else:
        logging.exception("Normal handling")
share|improve this answer

You can name specific exceptions in Python:

try:
    stuff()
except KeyboardInterrupt:
    sys.exit()
except Exception:
    normal_handling()
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Either use the standard method mentioned in the other answers, or if you really want to test within the except block then you can use isinstance().

try:
    stuff()
except Exception as e:
   if _debug and isinstance(e, KeyboardInterrupt):
        sys.exit()
    logging.exception("Normal handling")
share|improve this answer
try:
    stuff()
except KeyboardInterrupt:
    if _debug:
        sys.exit()
    logging.exception("Normal handling")
except ValueError:
    if _debug:
        sys.exit()
    logging.exception("Value error Normal handling")
else:
    logging.info("One more message without exception")
share|improve this answer
1  
-1: 'else' should be 'except', 'else' clause is for code to be executed if there is no exception. –  Paulo Scardine Dec 1 '10 at 22:05
    
Yes, 'else' branch will be executed when there is no exception. It's just for example. But you are right I should edit code example to show 'real' program state. –  Lex Dec 1 '10 at 22:16

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