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I've searched around all day on the applicable websites for this info, and on here found questions like this, but nothing that appears to directly address my question. Let me know if this has already been answered.

I work for a business that produces closed-source .NET components for use in a variety of applications. We would like to put our sample code (simple and complex samples) that uses our components into an open-source code hosting service that would allow our customers (and potential customers) to change/fix/update our samples and upload their own code/applications that use our components. I'm a bit new to this, and was wondering if there were suggestions as to what would be best suited for our needs.

CodePlex is first on my list since it explicitly states in its FAQ that "It is fine for your project to be dependent on closed-source or proprietary software" (It also supports mercurial, which seems to be a very popular DVCS). The other major sites (Google Code, SourceForge) only state that the software must have and abide by one of their acceptable open-source licenses. Which sites allow for code that is created with closed-source dependencies? (We would not prohibit the code from being modified to use open-source dependencies, though)

We do not want to prohibit use of the code in a closed-source project down the line; most of our customers produce closed-source applications, often based off of our sample applications. We do not want to restrict the licensing of their software (so the GPL as I understand it is straight out).

Would our sample code fall under any of the open-source licenses if we wanted to release it under one? We don't care much what anyone derives from our sample applications, but we want our closed-source dependencies to remain closed (they will be hosted on our own site, with its own EULA; users of the sample code will be directed to it). Do any/Which open-source licenses prohibit the use of closed-source dependencies?

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2 Answers

It actually doesn't matter much if your project depends on proprietary components, as long as you don't version these components on the source control under discussion.

The thing you should think about is:

We do not want to prohibit use of the code in a closed-source project down the line; most of our customers produce closed-source applications, often based off of our sample applications. We do not want to restrict the licensing of their software (so the GPL as I understand it is straight out).

Just pick a licence that allows your project to be open source, and be potentially used in a closed source by your clients, say BSD or MIT licence.

As far as I know, most open source licences do not restrict dependencies of their project, but to which project can your project be a dependency.

EDIT: Google Code allows BSD, MIT, and some other business friendly licences like Apache, Eclipse..

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Oh, really? That's great; so far as I can tell, no place other than CodePlex explicitly states it. Yeah, I was looking at those two licenses, but their language appears to indicate that all derived applications must also contain the license, which we wouldn't want to demand of our customers. We'd want the license to be present in all derived forms on the repository, but beyond that we would prefer that requirement to be left out. –  anonWrkrB Dec 1 '10 at 23:10
    
So, you can have entirely open source in your repository. Then, your clients may check out code, and do whatever they want with it later, including releasing under commercial licence of their choice. –  Goran Jovic Dec 1 '10 at 23:26
    
Of course, anyone else would be free do the same. For example, I could check out your source, make changes, and include it in my closed product. But, if you are OK with that - this is the solution. –  Goran Jovic Dec 1 '10 at 23:28
    
Yeah, we don't mind changes being made, then including it in a closed product. My main concern with the licenses are this text for BSD, and similar text for others: Redistribution... with or without modification are permitted provided that the following conditions are met: Redistributions in binary form must reproduce the above copyright notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer in the documentation and/or other materials provided with the distribution. This seems to indicate to me that it cannot be distributed without the license. Unless I'm wrong? –  anonWrkrB Dec 1 '10 at 23:39
    
You mean this text: freebsd.org/copyright/freebsd-license.html? Well, I am no lawyer, but I think that means that as long as the software is licensed under BSD it should be distributed with that text. –  Goran Jovic Dec 1 '10 at 23:52
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You can put your code on a "commercial" site like Bitbucket or GitHub.

Both offer hosting for open source and commercial projects (open source/public repositories always free without limitations), and as far as I know none of them has any restrictions concerning the license under which you can publish your code.

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