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i have a section of code i just dont know what to do with. it is supposed to show a dialog box to select a file and when the file is selected it outputs the results in a histograph. i have everything working except i can not figure out what variable i need to put as text2.

private int[] countLetters2()
 {
  // Count for 26 letters
  int[] count = new int[26];

  //get contents from file  
  chooser.showOpenDialog(null);
  File f = chooser.getSelectedFile();

  try
  {
   FileReader fr = new FileReader(f);
   BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(fr);
   String s;
   while((s = br.readLine()) != null)
   {
    System.out.println(s);   <------simply to see if the reader and buffer were working

   }
  }
  catch(IOException g) {} 


  String text2 = ; <------------------------------------this is the problem

  //converts every letter to uppercase
  text2 = text2.toUpperCase();  

  //Count occurrence of each letter (case insensitive)
  for (int i = 0; i < text2.length(); i++)
  {
   char character = text2.charAt(i);

   if ((character >= 'A') && (character <= 'Z'))
   {
    count[(int)character - 65]++; // The ASCII for 'A' is 65
   }
  }
  return count; // Return the count array 
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Are you trying to provide a histograph of the whole file, or of each line? –  Thomas Langston Dec 1 '10 at 22:26
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3 Answers

Move the loop that counts characgters into the loop where you print lines. Something like

private int[] countLetters2()
 {
  // Count for 26 letters
  int[] count = new int[26];

  //get contents from file  
  chooser.showOpenDialog(null);
  File f = chooser.getSelectedFile();

  try
  {
   FileReader fr = new FileReader(f);
   BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(fr);
   String s;
   while((s = br.readLine()) != null)
   {
    System.out.println(s);   
    //converts every letter to uppercase
    String text2 = s.toUpperCase();  

    //Count occurrence of each letter (case insensitive)
    for (int i = 0; i < text2.length(); i++)
    {
       char character = text2.charAt(i);

       if ((character >= 'A') && (character <= 'Z'))
       {
        count[(int)character - 65]++; // The ASCII for 'A' is 65
       }
    }
   }
  }
  catch(IOException g) {} 

  return count;
 }
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simply collect to your text2 variable inside your while loop.

         String text2 = "";
            try { FileReader fr = new FileReader(f); BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(fr); String s="" while((s = br.readLine()) != null) {
text2+=s; 
ystem.out.println(s);

            } } catch(IOException g) {}

OR

String s = "";
            try { FileReader fr = new FileReader(f); 
            BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(fr);
            String tmp;
            while((tmp = br.readLine()) != null) {              
                System.out.println(s);
                s += tmp;
            } } catch(IOException g) {}

            text2=tmp;
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s is null after the loop. That won't work –  Paul Dec 1 '10 at 22:26
    
just changed it so it will collect directly into you text2 –  Greg Dec 1 '10 at 22:27
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I think it makes little sense to use a BufferedReader to go through the file line by line and then go through each line character by character. That is unnecessary complicated and inefficient, given that you basically just want to iterate over all characters: this is exactly the functionality a Reader gives you in the first place.

You could greatly simplify your routine like so:

    [...]

    BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(fr);
    for (int c; (c = br.read()) > -1;) {
        char character = Character.toUpperCase((char) c);

        if ((character >= 'A') && (character <= 'Z')) {
            count[character - 'A']++;
        }
    }
} catch (IOException g) { /* this is no good */ }

return count;

This way you get rid of text2 altogether, your code is shorter, and your program will run faster (if measurable) because the unnecessary construction of a String is dropped.

P.S.: An unrelated note: make sure you handle the case in which the user clicks "Cancel" in the file chooser dialog.

P.P.S.: Could the user inadvertenly select a directory instead of a proper file in your program? What would happen then?

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