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With maven is it possible to have a top-level project who's packaging type is "war" which will build itself and all of its dependent modules (packaged as jar) and have the build generate a project.war file?

Much of the documentation examples and other examples I've seen often use a top-level project with packaging type of "pom" and the project only serves the purpose of tying the modules together. Can I avoid this?

So basically I need something which is effectively like declaring a <module>my-module</module> for maven to build, and in that same POM, declaring a <dependency>...my-module's artifact...</dependency> on that same module which needs to be built. Maybe a plugin as someone already suggested?

Update: In other words (to simplify the problem): If I have project A and project B, where project A depends on project B - is there a way for me to execute a build on project A and also have it automatically build project B (and include project B as its dependency - creating projectA.war which contains projectB.jar)?

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1  
You can do this via the maven command line - e.g. mvn compile -pl projectA -am. This SO question should help. –  amaidment Sep 30 '13 at 11:55

6 Answers 6

up vote 7 down vote accepted

That's not really what a top-level project is for. Your WAR project has dependencies, which are the artifacts (e.g. jars) that will be included in the WAR (in WEB-INF/lib) when you run 'mvn package'. Your WAR project pom can have the top-level project as its parent, but it shouldn't be the parent of its dependencies. You may want to have that top-level project be the parent of both the WAR project and of the JAR projects that are dependencies in the WAR.

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Well, I guess what I was implying is that I don't want a top level project. I want a project who has a string of dependencies and was hoping to avoid having to create a "dummy" top-level project to build the entire chain. –  oym Dec 1 '10 at 23:53
    
Ah... I don't know of any way to have maven build a project's dependencies, regardless of the packaging type--though some plugin may exist for that. I wrote my own utility in java to search my source code repository for projects included as dependencies in a pom. It checks out the dependency's source, increments the version in the pom, builds it, and updates the dependencyManagement of the main project's pom to reflect the new version of the dependency. –  super_aardvark Dec 2 '10 at 0:10
    
It would be nice if, in the same pom.xml, I could specify a project as a module to build AND declare it as a dependency. –  oym Dec 2 '10 at 0:46
1  
Perfect - this is the correct way to use Maven. Is there some particular reason you don't want to capture common project details from your various modules in your parent pom? Its not a "dummy" project -- but rather it represents your project as a whole, irrespective of individual modules. –  Justin Standard Dec 6 '10 at 20:59
1  
This is the way it is supposed to be done, as Justin said. Maven has a world view that you have to adopt. If you don't, you will be better off using Ant as your build system. Personally, changing my views was a much better route than using Ant. –  Mike Dec 10 '10 at 18:36

super_aardvark suggested correct way but,
For requirement I would suggest following structure It is suitable and good structure also :

Consedering ProjectA as project-webapp , ProjectB as project-core

You can have following structure :

Your Grand Project :

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<project xmlns="http://maven.apache.org/POM/4.0.0" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xsi:schemaLocation="http://maven.apache.org/POM/4.0.0 http://maven.apache.org/maven-v4_0_0.xsd">

    <modelVersion>4.0.0</modelVersion>

    <groupId>com.mycompany.project</groupId>
    <artifactId>project</artifactId>
    <version>2.0-SNAPSHOT</version>
    <packaging>pom</packaging>

    <name>Project Repository System</name>
    <description>Project Repository System R2</description>

    <modules>
        <module>project-core</module>
        <module>project-webapp</module>
    </modules>
 </project>

Your WebApp Project:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<project xmlns="http://maven.apache.org/POM/4.0.0" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xsi:schemaLocation="http://maven.apache.org/POM/4.0.0 http://maven.apache.org/maven-v4_0_0.xsd">
    <parent>
        <groupId>com.mycompany.project</groupId>
        <artifactId>project</artifactId>
        <version>2.0-SNAPSHOT</version>
    </parent>
    <modelVersion>4.0.0</modelVersion>
    <artifactId>project-webapp</artifactId>
    <version>2.0-SNAPSHOT</version>
    <packaging>war</packaging>
    <name>Project Web Application</name>
    <description>Project Repository</description>
    <dependency>
            <groupId>com.mycompany.project</groupId>
            <artifactId>project-core</artifactId>
            <version>2.0-SNAPSHOT</version>
     </dependency>

 </project>

Your Core Project:

<project>
    <parent>
        <groupId>com.mycompany.project</groupId>
        <artifactId>project</artifactId>
        <version>2.0-SNAPSHOT</version>
    </parent>
    <modelVersion>4.0.0</modelVersion>
    <artifactId>project-core</artifactId>
    <version>2.0-SNAPSHOT</version>
    <packaging>jar</packaging>
    <name>Project Core</name>
    <description>ProjectCore</description>

 </project>

Your Directory structure should look like:

-------Grand Parent.pom
  |
  |--------project-webapp
  |                     |
  |                     project-webapp.pom
  | 
  | -------project-core.pom
                        |
                       project-core.pom

From parent pom execute mvn clean install it will build both the web-app and core project

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Well..this is actually what i had before asking the question. My goal was to get rid of "grand parent" and have "project-webapp" build itself and "project-core". Thanks. –  oym Dec 10 '10 at 12:55

This is not possible in Maven 1, 2 or 3.

I'd recommend to give up this idea, because Maven's whole purpose is to enforce standardized development process. Don't fight the structure, just create a parent POM module and make the WAR module and other dependencies underneath it.

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Not really - (Well, I can think of a couple of ways, but I'd not use them as they're convoluted and go against the basic ethos/practices of Maven).

Don't forget that the other purpose of the top-level pom is to provide a single point to set common details such the particular versions of dependencies used in the modules of the project.

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In parent pom, you have to define a sequential order of modules to be compiled. You can add a war packing module to the last in that list. It will simply aggregate all previous compiled code together.

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the order doesn't need to be sequential. maven will determine the order when processing all pom's and dependencies. –  Salandur Dec 2 '10 at 14:34

NetBeans has an option that allows you to do exactly this with Maven projects but I don't know any pure Maven solutions. I think that the task is more suited for an IDE, because it knows for what depended projects you have the code (based of what projects you have opened in the workspace). How would Maven itself differentiate between a dependency that you want to build and one that needs to be fetched from the repository. And for those that need to be built, where should it look for the source code?

Anyway, another solution to the problem, that I used successfully a few times, is to create a simple shell script that navigates to your projects folders and starts the build then it waits for it to finish then proceeds to the next project and so on.

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