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Is there a 'standard' way to specify that a task continuation should run on the thread from which the initial task was created?

Currently I have the code below - it is working but keeping track of the dispatcher and creating a second Action seems like unnecessary overhead.

dispatcher = Dispatcher.CurrentDispatcher;
Task task = Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
{
    DoLongRunningWork();
});

Task UITask= task.ContinueWith(() =>
{
    dispatcher.Invoke(new Action(() =>
    {
        this.TextBlock1.Text = "Complete"; 
    }
});
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3 Answers 3

up vote 137 down vote accepted

Call the continuation with TaskScheduler.FromCurrentSynchronizationContext():

    Task UITask= task.ContinueWith(() =>
    {
     this.TextBlock1.Text = "Complete"; 
    }, TaskScheduler.FromCurrentSynchronizationContext());
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1  
Its valid only if the current execution context is on the UI thread. If you put this code inside another Task, then you get InvalidOperationException (look at Exceptions section) –  stukselbax Jun 19 at 8:41

If you have a return value you need to send to the UI you can use the generic version like this:

This is being called from an MVVM ViewModel in my case.

var updateManifest = Task<ShippingManifest>.Run(() =>
    {
        Thread.Sleep(5000);  // prove it's really working!

        // GenerateManifest calls service and returns 'ShippingManifest' object 
        return = GenerateManifest();  
    })

    .ContinueWith(manifest =>
    {
        // MVVM property
        this.ShippingManifest = manifest.Result;

        // or if you are not using MVVM...
        // txtShippingManifest.Text = manifest.Result.ToString();    

        System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine("UI manifest updated - " + DateTime.Now);

    }, TaskScheduler.FromCurrentSynchronizationContext());
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I just wanted to add this version because this is such a useful thread and I think this is a very simple implementation. I have used this multiple times in various types if multithreaded application:

 Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
      {
        DoLongRunningWork();
        Application.Current.Dispatcher.BeginInvoke(DispatcherPriority.Normal, new Action(() =>
              { txt.Text = "Complete"; }));
      });
share|improve this answer
    
Not downvoting since this is a viable solution in some scenarios; however, the accepted answer is way better. It is technology-agnostic (TaskScheduler is part of BCL, Dispatcher is not) and can be used to compose complex chains of tasks due to not having to worry about any fire-and-forget async operations (such as BeginInvoke). –  Kirill Shlenskiy Sep 22 at 4:01
    
@Kirill can you expand a little, because some SO threads have unanimously declared the dispatcher to be the correct method if using WPF of WinForms: One can invoke a GUI update either asynchronously (using BeginInvoke) or synchronously (Invoke), though typically the async is used because one would not want to block a background thread just for a GUI update. Does FromCurrentSynchronizationContext not put the continuation task into the main thread message queue in just the same way as the dispatcher? –  Dean Sep 22 at 4:37
    
sure thing. I'll address the Dispatcher issue first. Dispatcher.Invoke/BeginInvoke is a WPF concept; its counterpart in WinForms would be Control.Invoke/BeginInvoke. So now you have to tailor your code to the specific platform you're working with - which wouldn't be the case if you went with TaskScheduler.FromCurrentSynchronizationContext in the first place as it is part of the Base Class Library, and is therefore widely available. –  Kirill Shlenskiy Sep 22 at 4:45
    
Right, but the OP is certainly asking about WPF (and tagged it so), and does not want to keep a reference to any dispatcher (and I assume any synchronization context either - you can only get this from the main thread and you have to store a reference to it somewhere). Which is why I like the solution that I posted: there is a thread-safe static reference built in that requires none of this. I think this is extremely useful in the WPF context. –  Dean Sep 22 at 4:56
    
Just wanted to reinforce my last comment: The developer not only has to store the sync context, but he/she has to know that this is only available from the main thread; this problem has been the cause of confusion in dozens of SO questions: People all the time try to get that from the the worker thread. If their code has itself been moved into a worker thread, it fails because of this issue. So because of the prevalence of WPF, this should definitely be clarified here in this popular question. –  Dean Sep 22 at 5:23

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