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I'm looking for fast code for 64-bit (unsigned) cube roots. (I'm using C and compiling with gcc, but I imagine most of the work required will be language- and compiler-agnostic.) I will denote by ulong a 64-bit unisgned integer.

Given an input n I require the (integral) return value r to be such that

r * r * r <= n && n < (r + 1) * (r + 1) * (r + 1)

That is, I want the cube root of n, rounded down. Basic code like

return (ulong)pow(n, 1.0/3);

is incorrect because of rounding toward the end of the range. Unsophisticated code like

ulong
cuberoot(ulong n)
{
    ulong ret = pow(n + 0.5, 1.0/3);
    if (n < 100000000000001ULL)
        return ret;
    if (n >= 18446724184312856125ULL)
        return 2642245ULL;
    if (ret * ret * ret > n) {
        ret--;
        while (ret * ret * ret > n)
            ret--;
        return ret;
    }
    while ((ret + 1) * (ret + 1) * (ret + 1) <= n)
        ret++;
    return ret;
}

gives the correct result, but is slower than it needs to be.

This code is for a math library and it will be called many times from various functions. Speed is important, but you can't count on a warm cache (so suggestions like a 2,642,245-entry binary search are right out).

For comparison, here is code that correctly calculates the integer square root.

ulong squareroot(ulong a) {
    ulong x = (ulong)sqrt((double)a);
    if (x > 0xFFFFFFFF || x*x > a)
        x--;
    return x;
}
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2  
What is the slow part of your "Unsophisticated" implementation? is it the pow() call or one/both of the loops? –  RBarryYoung Dec 2 '10 at 13:29
    
The pow call is expensive (~140 clocks by instruction counting). The rest isn't free, though, especially with branch misprediction; it costs maybe 80 clocks factoring that in. –  Charles Dec 2 '10 at 20:45
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5 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The book "Hacker's Delight" has algorithms for this and many other problems. The code is online here. EDIT: That code doesn't work properly with 64-bit ints, and the instructions in the book on how to fix it for 64-bit are somewhat confusing. A proper 64-bit implementation (including test case) is online here.

I doubt that your squareroot function works "correctly" - it should be ulong a for the argument, not n :) (but the same approach would work using cbrt instead of sqrt, although not all C math libraries have cube root functions).

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Thanks for the correction. I can try that, but it's not clear to me that x (in the corresponding problem) will never be too small. I'll look at the link, though. –  Charles Dec 2 '10 at 5:20
    
The Hacker's Delight code certainly doesn't work for 64-bit integers; it fails for 8589934592, 8589934593, 8602523648, .... I may be able to adapt it, though. –  Charles Dec 2 '10 at 5:43
    
The squareroot() adaptation (sqrt -> cbrt, 0xFFFFFFFF -> 2642245) also fails, starting at 3375. If a guard is put on both sides it fails at 18446724184312856125. –  Charles Dec 2 '10 at 5:51
    
Oops, sorry. There's an overflow in the code if used as-is for 64-bit ints. The problem (and its fix) is described in the book, but it's apparently not in the code on the website. Fixed version here: gist.github.com/728432 –  Fabian Giesen Dec 4 '10 at 19:58
2  
Argh, sorry. Turns out the code in the book has bugs too :). Anyway, fixed version (tested this time, including test driver!) is here: gist.github.com/729557. The function is monotonic (it's effectively a binary search for digits of the cube root) and the test driver checks all "critical" points (0, i**3 and (i**3)-1 for all i so that the computation doesn't overflow, and 0xffffffffffffffff). At least when compiled with VC++, this one definitely does the right thing :) –  Fabian Giesen Dec 5 '10 at 22:50
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If pow is too expensive, you can use a count-leading-zeros instruction to get an approximation to the result, then use a lookup table, then some Newton steps to finish it.

int k = __builtin_clz(n); // counts # of leading zeros (often a single assembly insn)
int b = 64 - k;           // # of bits in n
int top8 = n >> (b - 8);  // top 8 bits of n (top bit is always 1)
int approx = table[b][top8 & 0x7f];

Given b and top8, you can use a lookup table (in my code, 8K entries) to find a good approximation to cuberoot(n). Use some Newton steps (see comingstorm's answer) to finish it.

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Maybe you could try converting the ulong to a float, and index on the top 16 bits. –  comingstorm Dec 2 '10 at 22:34
    
That should work as well. –  Keith Randall Dec 2 '10 at 22:40
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You could try a Newton's step to fix your rounding errors:

ulong r = (ulong)pow(n, 1.0/3);
if(r==0) return r; /* avoid divide by 0 later on */
ulong r3 = r*r*r;
ulong slope = 3*r*r;

ulong r1 = r+1;
ulong r13 = r1*r1*r1;

/* making sure to handle unsigned arithmetic correctly */
if(n >= r13) r+= (n - r3)/slope;
if(n < r3)   r-= (r3 - n)/slope;

A single Newton step ought to be enough, but you may have off-by-one (or possibly more?) errors. You can check/fix those using a final check&increment step, as in your OQ:

while(r*r*r > n) --r;
while((r+1)*(r+1)*(r+1) <= n) ++r;

or some such.

(I admit I'm lazy; the right way to do it is to carefully check to determine which (if any) of the check&increment things is actually necessary...)

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Good idea, but I don't think that pow is ever off by more than two so Newton's method is overkill. –  Charles Dec 2 '10 at 20:47
    
So, maybe some less-expensive approximation + Newton's method would be faster? –  comingstorm Dec 2 '10 at 22:29
    
Maybe. I'll have to look into it. –  Charles Dec 2 '10 at 23:24
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I would research how to do it by hand, and then translate that into a computer algorithm, working in base 2 rather than base 10.

We end up with an algorithm something like (pseudocode):

Find the largest n such that (1 << 3n) < input.
result = 1 << n.
For i in (n-1)..0:
    if ((result | 1 << i)**3) < input:
        result |= 1 << i.

We can optimize the calculation of (result | 1 << i)**3 by observing that the bitwise-or is equivalent to addition, refactoring to result**3 + 3 * i * result ** 2 + 3 * i ** 2 * result + i ** 3, caching the values of result**3 and result**2 between iterations, and using shifts instead of multiplication.

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Interesting. As written, not quite competitive with the naive version, but should be close (enough to require testing; instruction counting suggests < 370 cycles). I don't think your replacement of (result | 1 << i)**3 is actually an optimization, though -- you're at least two multiplies and 6+ other instructions and need to update result^3 and result^2 each time the if is taken. But with other optimizations this might work...? –  Charles Dec 2 '10 at 21:25
    
@Charles updating result^3 and result^2 comes for free, because they need to be calculated in the current step anyway. I'll write it out and edit. –  Karl Knechtel Dec 2 '10 at 22:12
    
@Charles ... Never mind, it doesn't work the way I thought it would. :( –  Karl Knechtel Dec 2 '10 at 22:21
    
I think yours is a good idea, and it might combine well with comingstorm's idea (yours to some level, then take over with Newton). I don't mind that it doesn't quite work now. :) –  Charles Dec 2 '10 at 23:26
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// On my pc: Math.Sqrt 35 ns, cbrt64 <70ns, cbrt32 <25 ns, (cbrt12 < 10ns)

// cbrt64(ulong x) is a C# version of:
// http://www.hackersdelight.org/hdcodetxt/acbrt.c.txt     (acbrt1)

// cbrt32(uint x) is a C# version of:
// http://www.hackersdelight.org/hdcodetxt/icbrt.c.txt     (icbrt1)

// Union in C#:
// http://www.hanselman.com/blog/UnionsOrAnEquivalentInCSairamasTipOfTheDay.aspx

using System.Runtime.InteropServices;  
[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Explicit)]  
public struct fu_32   // float <==> uint
{
[FieldOffset(0)]
public float f;
[FieldOffset(0)]
public uint u;
}

private static uint cbrt64(ulong x)
{
    if (x >= 18446724184312856125) return 2642245;
    float fx = (float)x;
    fu_32 fu32 = new fu_32();
    fu32.f = fx;
    uint uy = fu32.u / 4;
    uy += uy / 4;
    uy += uy / 16;
    uy += uy / 256;
    uy += 0x2a5137a0;
    fu32.u = uy;
    float fy = fu32.f;
    fy = 0.33333333f * (fx / (fy * fy) + 2.0f * fy);
    int y0 = (int)                                      
        (0.33333333f * (fx / (fy * fy) + 2.0f * fy));    
    uint y1 = (uint)y0;                                 

    ulong y2, y3;
    if (y1 >= 2642245)
    {
        y1 = 2642245;
        y2 = 6981458640025;
        y3 = 18446724184312856125;
    }
    else
    {
        y2 = (ulong)y1 * y1;
        y3 = y2 * y1;
    }
    if (y3 > x)
    {
        y1 -= 1;
        y2 -= 2 * y1 + 1;
        y3 -= 3 * y2 + 3 * y1 + 1;
        while (y3 > x)
        {
            y1 -= 1;
            y2 -= 2 * y1 + 1;
            y3 -= 3 * y2 + 3 * y1 + 1;
        }
        return y1;
    }
    do
    {
        y3 += 3 * y2 + 3 * y1 + 1;
        y2 += 2 * y1 + 1;
        y1 += 1;
    }
    while (y3 <= x);
    return y1 - 1;
}

private static uint cbrt32(uint x)
{
    uint y = 0, z = 0, b = 0;
    int s = x < 1u << 24 ? x < 1u << 12 ? x < 1u << 06 ? x < 1u << 03 ? 00 : 03 :
                                                         x < 1u << 09 ? 06 : 09 :
                                          x < 1u << 18 ? x < 1u << 15 ? 12 : 15 :
                                                         x < 1u << 21 ? 18 : 21 :
                           x >= 1u << 30 ? 30 : x < 1u << 27 ? 24 : 27;
    do
    {
        y *= 2;
        z *= 4;
        b = 3 * y + 3 * z + 1 << s;
        if (x >= b)
        {
            x -= b;
            z += 2 * y + 1;
            y += 1;
        }
        s -= 3;
    }
    while (s >= 0);
    return y;
}

private static uint cbrt12(uint x) // x < ~255
{
    uint y = 0, a = 0, b = 1, c = 0;
    while (a < x)
    {
        y++;
        b += c;
        a += b;
        c += 6;
    }
    if (a != x) y--;
    return y;
} 
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