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I'm currently writing a quick solution for Euler Problem #4 where one must find the largest palindromic number from the product of two 3-digit numbers.

To identify if a number is palindromic, you would obviously compare a reverse of the number with the original.

Since C# doesn't have a built in String.Reverse() method, what is the quickest way to reverse a string?

I will be testing all the suggested solution in a loop with 100,000,000 itterations. The correct answer will be given to the person who submitted the fastest solution.

I will be testing the solution in a C#.Net 3.5 console application

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You may have overspecified the solution, especially because your strings are so small. Why not ask for a method that compares two integers and returns true if they are palindromic? –  jdigital Jan 11 '09 at 17:15

11 Answers 11

up vote 13 down vote accepted

I think it might be faster to do the comparison in-place. If you reverse the string, you've got to:

  1. Instantiate a new string object (or StringBuffer object)
  2. Copy the data (in reverse) from the first string to the new string
  3. Do your comparison.

If you perform the comparison in place, you do only the last step. An even then, your comparison is only half the string (or half - 0.5, in the event of an odd number of characters). Something like the following should work:

static bool IsPalindromic(string s){
    int len = s.Length;
    int half = len-- >> 1;
    for(int i = 0; i < half; i++)
        if(s[i] != s[len - i])
            return false;
    return true;
}

EDIT:

Although this answers the OP's question, the solutions offered by ggf31416 and configurator solve the OP's real need about 30% faster, by my tests. configurator's solution is a tiny bit faster than ggf31416's, if you convert it to a static method and use ints instead of ulongs (but much slower, otherwise).


Incidentally, running through these examples to solve the problem the OP mentions (finding the largest palindromic product of any two three-digit numbers) with the simple (perhaps naïve) loop below:

for(int i = 100; i < 1000; i++)
    for(int j = i; j < 1000; j++) // calculations where j < i would be redundant
        ...

yields the following results on my machine:

IsPalindromic(product.ToString()) took 0.3064174 seconds.
ggf31416Reverse(product) == product took 0.1933994 seconds.
configuratorReverse(product) == product took 0.1872061 seconds.

Each produces the correct result of 913 * 993 = 906609.

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Your suggestion took 49secs 435ms –  GateKiller Jan 11 '09 at 18:56

Wouldn't reversing the number be faster?

// unchecked code, don't kill me if it doesn't even compile.
ulong Reverse(ulong number) {
    ulong result = 0;

    while (number > 0) {
        ulong digit = number % 10;
        result = result * 10 + digit;
        number /= 10;
    }

    return result;
}
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1  
+1, this is much, much more efficient than converting number to string, reversing it and doing string comparsion. –  lacop Jan 11 '09 at 18:12
    
Your suggestion took 34secs 249ms –  GateKiller Jan 11 '09 at 19:07
    
Shouldn't I get the accepted answer then? –  configurator Jan 11 '09 at 19:24
    
@configurator: Thanks for you effort :) I have accepted P Daddy's code because it specifically answered the original question. Also, ggf31416's FastReverse function is much quicker. –  GateKiller Jan 11 '09 at 19:40
1  
Any number module 10 is its last digit - so digit will always be the last digit of number. –  configurator Aug 6 '10 at 17:28

A you want to compare a number with its reverse it may be faster to reverse the number using division rather than converting it to a string. I still need to test the speed of it.

 private static int Reverse(int num) {
     int res = 0;
     while (num > 0) {
        int rm ;
        num = Math.DivRem(num, 10, out rm);
        res = res * 10 + rm;
     }
     return res;
  }

EDIT: DivRem was about 1% faster than division and module in my computer. A speed optimization is exit if the last digit is 0:

  private static int Reverse(int num) {
     int res = 0;
     int rm;
     num = Math.DivRem(num, 10, out rm);
     //Some magic value or return false, see below.
     if (rm == 0) return -1 ; 
     res = res * 10 + rm;
     while (num > 0) {
        num = Math.DivRem(num, 10, out rm);
        res = res * 10 + rm;
     }
     return res ;
  }

Making the method return a bool was slightly slower than comparing to a bool in a loop in my computer, but I don't understand why. Please test in your computer.

Multiplication and bit-shifing should be faster than division but probably are not precise enough. EDIT: using long seems be precise enough.

  private static int FastReverse(int num) {
     int res = 0;
     int q = (int)((214748365L * num) >> 31);
     int rm = num - 10 * q;
     num = q;
     if (rm == 0) return -1;
     res = res * 10 + rm;
     while (num > 0) {
        q = (int)((214748365L * num) >> 31);
        rm = num - 10 * q;
        num = q;
        res = res * 10 + rm;
     }
     return res;
  }

(214748365L * num) >> 31 is equal to i / 10 until 1,073,741,829 where 1 / 10 gives 107374182 and the multiplication + binary shifting gives 107374183.

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I didn't know about Math.DivRem. Nice touch. –  configurator Jan 11 '09 at 17:31
    
Your first suggestion took 36secs 816ms and you second suggestion took 34secs 74ms –  GateKiller Jan 11 '09 at 19:01
1  
OMG! Your third suggestion took 13secs 916ms! –  GateKiller Jan 11 '09 at 19:28
    
Nice trick! For those who don't understand why this works, ">> 31" is equivalent to dividing by 2,147,483,648. So multiplying by 214,748,365 then dividing by 2,147,483,648 yields the same result as dividing by 10 (thanks to integer truncation), but is much faster, since divide is slow slow. –  P Daddy Jan 11 '09 at 19:41
string test = "ABC";
string reversed = new String(test.ToCharArray().Reverse().ToArray());
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Your suggestion took 1min 51secs 608ms –  GateKiller Jan 11 '09 at 18:53
public static String Reverse(string input) {
  var length = input.Length;
  var buffer = new char[length];
  for ( var i= 0; i < input.Length; i++ ) {
    buffer[i] = input[(length-i)-1];
  }
  return new String(buffer);
}

EDIT: Doh! Forgot to halve the length for perf :)

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Your suggestion took 1min 49secs 919ms –  GateKiller Jan 11 '09 at 18:49

The fastest way I have found to reverse a string in C# is with the following code. It's faster reading in 32bits at a time instead of a char's length of 16bits. In debug mode, it is faster until you get to about 93 characters. Anything longer than that Array.Reverse() is faster. Using a release build and running outside of the IDE, this method will blow Array.Reverse() out of the water at any string length.

char[] MyCharArray = MyString.ToCharArray();
UIntStringReverse(ref MyCharArray);     //Code to reverse is below.
string ReversedString = new string(MyCharArray);


private static unsafe void UIntStringReverse(ref char[] arr)
{
    uint Temp;
    uint Temp2;

    fixed (char* arrPtr = &arr[0])
    {
        uint* p, q;
        p = (uint*)(arrPtr);
        q = (uint*)(arrPtr + arr.LongLength - 2);

        if (arr.LongLength == 2)
        {
            Temp = *p;
            *p = ((Temp & 0xFFFF0000) >> 16) | ((Temp & 0x0000FFFF) << 16); 
            return;
        }

        while (p < q)
        {
            Temp = *p;
            Temp2 = *q;

            *p = ((Temp2 & 0xFFFF0000) >> 16) | ((Temp2 & 0x0000FFFF) << 16); 
            *q = ((Temp & 0xFFFF0000) >> 16) | ((Temp & 0x0000FFFF) << 16);

            p++;
            q--;
        }
    }
}
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string Reverse(string s)
{
  return new string(s.ToCharArray().Reverse().ToArray());
}
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While not the most performant it's the smallest and easiest to write. –  Peter Oehlert Jan 11 '09 at 19:06

Using ggf31416's FastReverse function, here is the solution to Project Euler's Problem #4 which completes on my computer in 47ms.

using System;
using System.Diagnostics;

namespace Euler_Problem_4
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Stopwatch s = new Stopwatch();
            s.Start();

            int t = 0;

            for (int i = 999; i > 99; i--)
            {
                for (int j = i; j > 99; j--)
                {
                    if (i*j == FastReverse(i*j))
                    {
                        if (i * j > t)
                        {
                            t = i * j;
                        }
                    }
                }
            }

            Console.WriteLine(t);

            s.Stop();
            Console.WriteLine("{0}mins {1}secs {2}ms", s.Elapsed.Minutes, s.Elapsed.Seconds, s.Elapsed.Milliseconds);
            Console.ReadKey(true);

        }

        private static int FastReverse(int num)
        {
            int res = 0;
            int q = (int)((214748365L * num) >> 31);
            int rm = num - 10 * q;
            num = q;
            if (rm == 0) return -1;
            res = res * 10 + rm;
            while (num > 0)
            {
                q = (int)((214748365L * num) >> 31);
                rm = num - 10 * q;
                num = q;
                res = res * 10 + rm;
            }
            return res;
        }
    }
}
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The Stopwatch class needs reset after each run. the code below has been corrected

var d = s.ToCharArray();
Array.Reverse(d);
return s == new string(d);


using System;
using System.Diagnostics;

namespace longeststring_codegolf
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            int t = 0, v = 0;
            var sw = new Stopwatch();

            sw.Start();
            for (int i = 999; i > 99; i--)
                for (int j = 999; j > 99; j--)
                    if ((v = i * j) > t && IsPalindromicMine(v.ToString()))
                        t = v;
            sw.Stop();

            var elapsed = sw.Elapsed;
            var elapsedMilliseconds = sw.ElapsedMilliseconds;
            var elapsedTicks = sw.ElapsedTicks; 
            Console.WriteLine("Ticks: " + elapsedTicks.ToString());//~189000
            Console.WriteLine("Milliseconds: " + elapsedMilliseconds.ToString()); //~9

            sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
            for (int i = 999; i > 99; i--)
                for (int j = 999; j > 99; j--)
                    if ((v = i * j) > t && IsPalindromic(v.ToString()))
                        t = v;
            sw.Stop();
            var elapsed2 = sw.Elapsed;
            var elapsedMilliseconds2 = sw.ElapsedMilliseconds;
            var elapsedTicks2 = sw.ElapsedTicks; 
            Console.WriteLine("Ticks: " + elapsedTicks2.ToString());//~388000
            Console.WriteLine("Milliseconds: " + elapsedMilliseconds2.ToString());//~20

        }

        static bool IsPalindromicMine(string s)
        {
            var d = s.ToCharArray();
            Array.Reverse(d);
            return s == new string(d);
        }

        static bool IsPalindromic(string s)
        {
            int len = s.Length;
            int half = len-- >> 1;
            for (int i = 0; i < half; i++)
                if (s[i] != s[len - i])
                    return false;
            return true;
        }

    }
}
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I beg to differ. A few people have already proposed your above solution which is, in fact, the slowest! –  GateKiller Jun 18 '09 at 14:53
    
Yeah, I know the problem with the timer is the fact I didnt reset it (I was assuming calling start would reset it) His wins mainly by the fact it only has to test half of the string. And so it is on average twice as fast. (But seeing that my answer is the same ... if not faster than the version using the linq version of Reverse() I don't see why I get the down vote) –  Matthew Whited Jun 18 '09 at 15:33

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