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I have a method that takes an InputStream and reads data from it. I would like to use this method with a ByteBuffer also. Is there a way to wrap a ByteBuffer so it can be accessed as a stream?

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Is it a native ByteBuffer, or backed by a byte array? –  EboMike Dec 2 '10 at 6:24
    
Backed by a byte array in this case –  Erik Dec 2 '10 at 6:30
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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Nothing in the JDK, but there are lots of implementations out there, google for ByteBufferInputStream. Basically they wrap one or more ByteBuffers and keep track of an index into them that records how much has already been read. Something like this comes up a lot, but apparently is buggy, see @Mike Houston's answer for an improved version).

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Passes my unit tests! –  Erik Dec 2 '10 at 7:09
2  
kind of stinks that the jdk doesn't have this built in though!!! –  Dean Hiller Apr 11 '12 at 20:54
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There seem to be some bugs with the implementation referred to by Thilo, and also copy and pasted on other sites verbatim:

  1. ByteBufferBackedInputStream.read() returns a sign extended int representation of the byte it reads, which is wrong (value should be in range [-1..255])
  2. ByteBufferBackedInputStream.read(byte[], int, int) does not return -1 when there are no bytes remaining in the buffer, as per the API spec

ByteBufferBackedOutputStream seems relatively sound.

I present a 'fixed' version below. If I find more bugs (or someone points them out) I'll update it here.

Updated: removed synchronized keywords from read/write methods

InputStream

public class ByteBufferBackedInputStream extends InputStream {

    ByteBuffer buf;

    public ByteBufferBackedInputStream(ByteBuffer buf) {
        this.buf = buf;
    }

    public int read() throws IOException {
        if (!buf.hasRemaining()) {
            return -1;
        }
        return buf.get() & 0xFF;
    }

    public int read(byte[] bytes, int off, int len)
            throws IOException {
        if (!buf.hasRemaining()) {
            return -1;
        }

        len = Math.min(len, buf.remaining());
        buf.get(bytes, off, len);
        return len;
    }
}

OutputStream

public class ByteBufferBackedOutputStream extends OutputStream {
    ByteBuffer buf;

    public ByteBufferBackedOutputStream(ByteBuffer buf) {
        this.buf = buf;
    }

    public void write(int b) throws IOException {
        buf.put((byte) b);
    }

    public void write(byte[] bytes, int off, int len)
            throws IOException {
        buf.put(bytes, off, len);
    }

}
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Thank you @Mike for a code. I have a suggestion. I think it is better to add @Override public void flush() throws IOException { buf.flip(); } method to ByteBufferBackedOutputStream code. –  denys May 8 '12 at 12:49
1  
Why would you make it synchronized? Do you expect multiple threads to read the same inputstream? –  Nim May 23 '13 at 13:46
    
That's a very good point, more copy & paste laziness there. I will edit to remove, as it's not part of the InputStream/OutputStream API contract. –  Mike Houston May 29 '13 at 9:03
1  
@denys, sorry, only just noticed your comment - why do you want the flush to have that effect? It seems like a flip would be confusing, since it would overwrite earlier data, which isn't what flush() normally does. I assume you are trying to use a single buffer wrapped in both a input and output stream as a buffer? –  Mike Houston May 29 '13 at 9:14
    
You are right @MikeHouston it is better to name it flip(). Yes I'm using the same buffer for consumer and reader. –  denys May 29 '13 at 11:09
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If it's backed by a byte array, you can use a ByteArrayInputStream and get the byte array via ByteBuffer.array(). This will throw an exception if you're trying it on a native ByteBuffer.

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By "native ByteBuffer" do you mean a ByteBuffer object that was created via ByteBuffer.allocateDirect()? –  BD at Rivenhill Feb 9 '12 at 6:50
3  
This approach only works if you're sure you want to read the entire contents of the backing byte array. For cases where you have a partially-full buffer, you'll end up reading beyond the limit. –  stevevls Nov 15 '12 at 20:24
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