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I got a column in which I wanna store date formats that is dd/mm/yy, mm/dd/yy , etc. What data type do I need to use for this column in my table ? DateTime??

oh and also if I want to store Time format like 24.00 hrs..What data type then ?

I need to store the FORMATS like mm/dd/yy or dd/mm/yy not dates like 2010-12-01 or whatever..SO I should use DATeTime only ?

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

Store the dates as datetime or timestamp or any of the built-in date or date/time datatypes. Don't worry about formatting the value in the db itself. You can format the date using the language of your choice (whatever language you're using to retrieve the information).

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I need to store the FORMATS like mm/dd/yy or dd/mm/yy not dates like 2010-12-01 or whatever..SO I should use DATeTime only ? – Serenity Dec 2 '10 at 7:03
    
Ah, I misunderstood. I thought you were storing the date values themselves. If you're storing the string 'mm/dd/yy' or 'dd/mm/yy', you'd want to store that as char or varchar, as demas suggested. – charliegriefer Dec 2 '10 at 7:09
    
ok and what about Time format ? use varchar for that too ? – Serenity Dec 2 '10 at 7:15
    
Indeed. They're string representations of the format mask that you want to display the date in. Strings are generally char or varchar (or text if you have a lot of text, but generally char/varchar) – charliegriefer Dec 2 '10 at 7:24

If you want to store date and time you need DateTime column type. To convert it to desired format you can use CAST and CONVERT functions.

To store formats as strings you can use VARCHAR - 'mm/dd/yy'.

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