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I work as a programmer, but have no computer science background, so recently I've been following along with the excellent MIT OpenCourseWare intro to Computer Science and Programming. In the course of which, the question is asked: "will any program written using only function definitions and calls, the basic arithmetic operators, assignment and conditionals run in constant time?"

I thought the answer was yes, since all of these operations seem pretty simple. But as you smart people probably already knew, the correct answer was no, apparently because of the potential for indefinite recursion.

It seems like I just don't understand the implications of "in constant time". The way I pictured the meaning, it sounded like it just meant that a simple operation would take a known amount of time to complete. I accept that recursion can lead to your program running forever, but aren't the individual operations still taking a finite and measurable amount of time each... even if there are now an infinite number of them? Or does the answer just mean that two infinitely recursive programs cannot validly be said to take the same amount of time to run?

If anyone can give me an authoritative definition of "in constant time", and the implications thereof, I'd be very grateful!

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Constant in time is O(1) in "Big-O" notation. You might also find that a read through of this question helps - Plain English explanation of Big O‌​. –  Justin Dec 2 '10 at 8:11
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8 Answers

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Constant time effectively means you can give a constant upper bound to how long the program will take to run which isn't affected by any of the input parameters.

Compare that with, say, linear time (for some input n - which will often actually be the size of the input data rather than a direct value) - which means that the upper bound of the time taken can be expressed as mn + k for some values of m and k.

Note that it doesn't mean a program will take the same amount of time for any input data just because it runs in constant time. For example, consider this method:

int foo(int n)
{
    if (n == 0)
    {
        return 0;
    }
    int j = n + 1;
    int k = j * 2;
    return k;
}

That's doing more work in the case where n is non-zero than in the case where it's zero. However, it's still constant time - at most, it's going to do one comparison, one addition, and one multiplication.

Now compare that with a recursive function:

public int foo(int n)
{
    if (n <= 1)
    {
        return 1;
    }
    return n * foo(n - 1);
}

This will recurse n times - so it's linear in n. You can get much worse than linear, however. Consider this method for computing a Fibonacci number:

public int fib(int n)
{
    if (n == 0)
    {
        return 0;
    }
    if (n == 1)
    {
        return 1;
    }
    return fib(n - 2) + fib(n - 1);
}

That doesn't look much worse than the previous version - but this is now exponential (the upper bound is most easily expressed in terms as O(2n). It's still only using simple comparisons, addition, and function calls though.

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In the recursive function, shouldn't the comparison be if (n <= 1) since foo hasn't been defined? –  Steve Feb 17 at 15:28
    
@Steve: Fixed, thanks. –  Jon Skeet Feb 17 at 15:31
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In "constant time" generally means that the time it will take to compute the result is independent of the size of the input.

For example. Calculating the length of a list / vector in most managed languages is done in constant time no matter how large the list is. The size is stored as a separate field and is updated as the list grows and shrinks. But calculating the count is as simple as reading the field.

Calculating the size of a doubly linked list is very often not constant time. The list can often be mutated on both ends and hence there is no central place to store a count. Hence determining the length of the list necessitates visiting it and determining how many elements are in there. So as the list grows so does the time it takes to calculate the answer.

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Assuming you have no "container" object like LinkedList<T> of course :) –  Jon Skeet Dec 2 '10 at 7:26
    
@Jon, very true. I've been stuck lately though dealing with linked lists that have no containers and hence lots of non constant operations :( –  JaredPar Dec 2 '10 at 7:28
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"Constant time" means that the operation will execute in an amount of time (or memory space - that's another thing often measured) independent of the input size. Usually you pick a variable (let's use n) to indicate the input size.

O(1) - constant time - running time does not depend on n

O(n) - linear time - running time is linearly proportional to n

O(n^2) - quadratic time - running time is proportional to the square of n

These are just a few examples; the possibilities are endless. See the wiki article on complexity

Here's a few specific ways that a program composed of only the operations you mention could take various amounts of time:

int n = // some value
doSomething
doSomething
doSomething

Note how it is three somethings in length, independent of what n is. O(1)

int n = // some value
def f(n):
    if n == 0 return
    doSomething
    f(n-1)
f(n)

Now we run a something for each value 0..n (linear time, O(n))

And we can have a bit of fun -

int n = //some value
def f(n):
    if n == 0 return
    doSomething
    f(n-1)
    f(n-1)

What's the running time here? (i.e. how many somethings do we execute?) :)

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Thanks! All the examples people are giving of functions not in constant time seem to be functions that call themselves. Would it be right to think that a function accepting an input n, and then printing "Hello" n times inside a for or while loop, would also not be in constant time (but in linear time)? –  thesunneversets Dec 2 '10 at 19:36
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There's a lot of questions on SO about Big-O notation... "constant time" has the same meaning as "O(1)". Which doesn't mean that an algorithm runs in a known amount of time, it just means that it isn't proportional to the length/size/magnitude of the input. i.e., for any input, it can be computed in the same amount of time (even if that amount of time is really freaking long).

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The real important thing to consider is how the time scales as a function of the number of elements. In constant time means that the time remains the same no matter how many elements are involved (layman's explanation).

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If the program runs forever, then it doesn't complete in a known amount of time, because it doesn't complete. We are applying the concept of "constant time" to the run of the entire program, not to each individual step.

"constant time" means "time not depending on the amount of input".

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"In constant time" means that no matter what the input is, the program will not run longer than a known amount of time.

Consider the factorial function as a counterexample. The factorial of, say, 5 is calculated like:

5! = 5 * 4 * 3 * 2 * 1 = 120

This will obviously take less time to compute than the factorial of 10 because to do the latter, the program has to do five more multiplications:

10! = 10 * 9 * 8 * 7 * 6 * 5 * 4 * 3 * 2 * 1

So, "constant time" does not mean that we know how long the program will run in each case but that it will never run longer than a known amount of time (the upper bound).

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No it doesn't. It means the upper bound is constant does not depend on the input. The result can still be computed faster for some values than others. –  Jon Skeet Dec 2 '10 at 7:27
    
Thank you! I updated my answer. –  neo2862 Dec 2 '10 at 7:29
    
Thanks. I'd remove my comment, but then yours would make no sense ;) –  Jon Skeet Dec 2 '10 at 7:50
    
No, it's perfectly OK if it stays there showing that the Chuck Norris of programming talked to me! :) –  neo2862 Dec 2 '10 at 7:59
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Constant time here means not dependent on number of inputs (not the input itself), and if you aren't allowed for or goto, the only way to make it depend on the number of inputs is by conditionals and recursion. Although you could argue that recursion isn't necessary with some debatable solutions. Eg. (in C)

if(ReadInput()) DoSomeThing();
if(ReadInput()) DoSomeThing();
if(ReadInput()) DoSomeThing();
if(ReadInput()) DoSomeThing();
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