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I would like to use Ctrl + Tab in EMACS for my own use, but Emacs org mode already has this bound. How can I use my own binding instead of the org-mode binding.

In my .emacs file I use:

(global-set-key (kbd "<C-tab>") 'switch-view )

and it works everywhere except in org-mode

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3 Answers 3

up vote 14 down vote accepted

The key binding you describe is defined in org.el like this:

(org-defkey org-mode-map [(control tab)] 'org-force-cycle-archived)

This means that it is only valid in org-mode-map, one of org-mode's local keymaps. The following code adds a hook that is run when org-mode starts. It simply removes that key binding from org-mode-map.

(add-hook 'org-mode-hook
          '(lambda ()
             (define-key org-mode-map [(control tab)] nil)))

Add this code to your .emacs file and then restart emacs.

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Where do I add this "add-hook" line? If I could add it to .emacs it would be ideal :) –  Zubair Dec 2 '10 at 10:34
    
I added this hook to my .emacs file and no change also –  Zubair Dec 2 '10 at 10:43
    
I also tried commenting out the ord-defkey in org.el, but no change. I guess there is some sort of precompiling going on so the modified org.el file is ignored –  Zubair Dec 2 '10 at 10:46
    
@Zubair: Yes, you can just add this to your .emacs file. I tried it with Emacs 23.2 with the built-in version of org-mode. You shouldn't need to edit the org-mode sources, but yeah, org.el is ignored if org.elc (compiled Elisp) is in the same directory. –  paprika Dec 2 '10 at 11:23
    
You can try out the define-key without the hook. Just start up Emacs, make sure org-mode is loaded (e.g. open an org-file) and paste the following into the scratch buffer (without quotes): "(define-key org-mode-map [(control tab)] nil)". Now move the cursor behind the last parenthesis and press C-x C-e. This evaluates the last expression. Try if this has some effect. If it does the it's the hook that's not working. –  paprika Dec 2 '10 at 11:28

A more robust way to set the keybindings that you want to take effect everywhere regardless of the major mode is to define a global minor mode with a custom keymap.

Minor modes can also have local keymaps; whenever a minor mode is in effect, the definitions in its keymap override both the major mode's local keymap and the global keymap

( http://www.gnu.org/software/emacs/manual/html_node/emacs/Local-Keymaps.html )

That way you don't need to mess with the major mode's local keymap every time you encounter a mode that clobbers your keybinding.

See this Q&A for details:
Globally override key binding in Emacs

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This doesn't work because, as you said, org-mode uses its own keybinding for C-TAB. In other words, even if you define a global keybinding, as soon as you invoke org-mode, it will overwrite that binding with its local keybindings.

What you can do, however, is add a callback function that is invoked whenever you start org-mode, and in that callback function you reset C-TAB to invoke switch-view:

(add-hook 'org-mode-hook (lambda () (local-set-key [(control tab)] 'switch-view)))

Put the above line in your .emacs file and next time you start a new Emacs you should be good to go.

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I added the line above to the end of my .emacs file but it had no affect at all –  Zubair Dec 2 '10 at 10:33
    
Did you restart Emacs after adding the line to your .emacs file? Which version of Emacs do you use? –  Thomas Dec 2 '10 at 11:32
    
Actually, I think I like paprika's version better. I've tried that one, too, and it works for me in GNU Emacs 23.1.1. –  Thomas Dec 2 '10 at 11:40
    
Yes, I did restart Emacs, several times. GNU Version 23.2 in "-nw" mode –  Zubair Dec 2 '10 at 11:42
    
Should there be a quote in front of (lambda ... ? –  John D. Cook Mar 7 '12 at 12:54

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