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I want to write a simple program that does nothing but does not easily terminate when asked to. I want to see the Windows dialog box which says, "this program is not responsive, do you want to wait to let it finish what it's doing, or terminate it now?". After the user chooses "terminate it now", it should, of course, exit.

The reason I want this is for a testing environment. I want to test a scenario in which the user is trying to log out, but the system doesn't log them out right away, because of an unresponsive program.

I tried responding to WM_DESTROY by calling Sleep(), but that doesn't seem to do it. The program still terminates immediately when killed from the Task Manager. Again, I'm not trying to write something truly "unkillable", just a simple program which makes that dialog box come up asking if the user wants to wait for the program to finish.

Thanks very much for any help.

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What do you mean by "when killed from Task Manager"? What menu items or buttons are you pressing? Edit your question to include this information. – wj32 Dec 2 '10 at 11:21

You can try modifying your main-message loop . Use PeekMessage(...) with NO_REMOVE and ignore WM_QUIT messages

EDIT: Remove every message (except WM_QUIT) before processing it (GetMessage( &msg ,msg.hWnd ,msg.message ,msg.message ))

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What does PM_NOREMOVE have to do with it? Why would you want to leave the quit message in the queue, if your intent is to ignore it? You'll just end up processing it over and over again. – Ben Voigt Dec 2 '10 at 18:39
    
@Ben Voigt: Avoid terminating the message-loop ! – engf-010 Dec 2 '10 at 19:19

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