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My code works fine for normal devices but creates blurry images on retina devices.

Does anybody know a solution for my issue?

+ (UIImage *) imageWithView:(UIView *)view
{
    UIGraphicsBeginImageContext(view.bounds.size);
    [view.layer renderInContext:UIGraphicsGetCurrentContext()];

    UIImage * img = UIGraphicsGetImageFromCurrentImageContext();

    UIGraphicsEndImageContext();

    return img;
}
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Ugly, in what way? –  Marcelo Cantos Dec 2 '10 at 11:05
    
blurry. It seems to me the right scale got lost... –  Daniel Dec 2 '10 at 12:12

5 Answers 5

up vote 369 down vote accepted

Switch from use of UIGraphicsBeginImageContext to UIGraphicsBeginImageContextWithOptions (as documented on this page). Pass 0.0 for scale (the third argument) and you'll get a context with a scale factor equal to that of the screen.

UIGraphicsBeginImageContext uses a fixed scale factor of 1.0, so you're actually getting exactly the same image on an iPhone 4 as on the other iPhones. I'll bet either the iPhone 4 is applying a filter when you implicitly scale it up or just your brain is picking up on it being less sharp than everything around it.

So, I guess:

#import <QuartzCore/QuartzCore.h>

+ (UIImage *) imageWithView:(UIView *)view
{
    UIGraphicsBeginImageContextWithOptions(view.bounds.size, view.opaque, 0.0);
    [view.layer renderInContext:UIGraphicsGetCurrentContext()];

    UIImage * img = UIGraphicsGetImageFromCurrentImageContext();

    UIGraphicsEndImageContext();

    return img;
}
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3  
This works great for me! Thanks. –  Daniel Dec 2 '10 at 13:19
5  
Tommy answer is fine , but you still need to import #import <QuartzCore/QuartzCore.h> to remove renderInContext: warning . –  gwdp May 10 '11 at 3:29
1  
@WayneLiu you could specify a scale factor of 2.0 explicitly but you probably wouldn't get exactly an iPhone 4 quality image because any bitmaps that had been loaded would be the standard versions rather than the @2x versions. I don't think there's a solution to that as there's no way to instruct everyone that is currently holding on to a UIImage to reload but force the high resolution version (and you'd likely run up against problems due to the lesser RAM available in pre-retina devices anyway). –  Tommy Feb 27 '12 at 19:13
4  
Instead of using the 0.0f for the scale parameter, is it more acceptable to use [[UIScreen mainScreen] scale], it works too. –  Adam Carter Aug 14 '12 at 17:06
8  
@Adam Carter scale: The scale factor to apply to the bitmap. If you specify a value of 0.0, the scale factor is set to the scale factor of the device’s main screen. It's explicitly documented, so 0.0f is simpler and better in my opinion. –  cprcrack Oct 24 '13 at 11:36

The current accepted answer is now out of date, at least if you are supporting iOS 7.

Here is what you should be using if you are only supporting iOS7+:

+ (UIImage *) imageWithView:(UIView *)view
{
    UIGraphicsBeginImageContextWithOptions(view.bounds.size, view.opaque, 0.0f);
    [view drawViewHierarchyInRect:view.bounds afterScreenUpdates:NO];
    UIImage * snapshotImage = UIGraphicsGetImageFromCurrentImageContext();
    UIGraphicsEndImageContext();
    return snapshotImage;
}

As per this article, you can see that the new iOS7 method drawViewHierarchyInRect:afterScreenUpdates: is many times faster than renderInContext:. benchmark

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Strange, I'm seeing worse performance using snapshotView. –  bmueller Jun 6 at 16:21
1  
There is no doubt, that drawViewHierarchyInRect:afterScreenUpdates: is a lot faster. I just ran a Time profiler in Instruments. My image generation went from 138ms to 27ms. –  Thomas Clemensen Jul 21 at 7:09
    
yup, quicker than before. –  Johnny Rockex Jul 24 at 13:56
    
For some reason this didn't work for me when I was trying to create custom icons for Google Maps markers; all I got was black rectangles :( –  JakeP Sep 10 at 8:44
1  
U sir just saved my life and my app –  Hans Adiputra Arijanto Sep 30 at 18:14

To improve answers by @Tommy and @Dima, use the following category to render UIView into UIImage with transparent background and without loss of quality. Working on iOS7. (Or just reuse that method in implementation, replacing self reference with your image)

UIView+RenderViewToImage.h

#import <UIKit/UIKit.h>

@interface UIView (RenderToImage)

- (UIImage *)imageByRenderingView;

@end

UIView+RenderViewToImage.m

#import "UIView+RenderViewToImage.h"

@implementation UIView (RenderViewToImage)

- (UIImage *)imageByRenderingView
{
    UIGraphicsBeginImageContextWithOptions(self.bounds.size, NO, [[UIScreen mainScreen] scale]);
    [self drawViewHierarchyInRect:self.bounds afterScreenUpdates:YES];
    UIImage * snapshotImage = UIGraphicsGetImageFromCurrentImageContext();
    UIGraphicsEndImageContext();
    return snapshotImage;
}

@end
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Some times drawRect Method makes problem so I got these answers more appropriate. You too may have a look on it Capture UIImage of UIView stuck in DrawRect method

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Add this to method to UIView Category

- (UIImage*) capture {
    UIGraphicsBeginImageContext(self.bounds.size);
    CGContextRef context = UIGraphicsGetCurrentContext();
    [self.layer renderInContext:context];
    UIImage *img = UIGraphicsGetImageFromCurrentImageContext();
    UIGraphicsEndImageContext();
    return img;
}
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