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I have two tables, a current table and an archive table.

When searching for a record, I don't know which table it will be in, so I have a query something like the following:

SELECT myThing FROM (current UNION archive)

I would like to know, is it possible to write the above query as something like

SELECT myThing FROM current

IF myThing IS NULL
BEGIN
    SELECT myThing FROM ARCHIVE
END

and which, if either, or these approaches is likely to be more performant.

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1  
Will there only ever be one row returned for the query? –  Martin Smith Dec 2 '10 at 11:34
    
@Martin, yes 0 or 1 rows –  fearofawhackplanet Dec 2 '10 at 11:40
    
What is your table structure and how does your archive process work? For example do you have an identity column or datetime column such that at any one time the maximum identity value in the archive table will be less than the minimum value in the current table? If so you could use a partitioned view. –  Martin Smith Dec 2 '10 at 11:51

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your second example will almost work as it is. Just needs a variable

Declare @theThing varchar(max)

SELECT @theThing = myThing FROM current

IF (@theThing IS NULL)
BEGIN
    SELECT @theThing = myThing FROM ARCHIVE
END

-- to 'output' the value
SELECT @theThing

You could then stick that code in a stored procedure or function or something.

Note sure whether it will be faster than the union or not. My hunch would be the above would be faster if myThing is indexed in both tables. But thats just a guess.

edit: Performance will also be affected by how often the thing is found in the first table. Above code will likely be faster than a union if the target is found in the first table the majority of the time.

edit: As Martin points out, all this is only worth it if there's guaranteed to be only one match in the two tables. Otherwise, you need a Union.

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Thanks. There is no indexing (we don't "own" the database), but yes most access will be to the 'current' table. –  fearofawhackplanet Dec 2 '10 at 11:42

Using UNION will be the performance killer as this will force a distinct sort of the two tables. The plan with UNION ALL looks OK to me. You can add a TOP 1 to get it to stop looking after the first row is found.

CREATE TABLE #current (id INT PRIMARY KEY, DATA CHAR(10))   
CREATE TABLE #ARCHIVE (id INT PRIMARY KEY, DATA CHAR(10))   

INSERT INTO #current
SELECT 1, 'A' UNION ALL SELECT 2, 'B' 

INSERT INTO #ARCHIVE
SELECT 101, 'C' UNION ALL SELECT 102, 'D' 

DECLARE @id INT
SET @id = 102

;WITH things AS
(
SELECT * FROM #current
UNION ALL
SELECT * FROM #ARCHIVE
)

SELECT TOP (1) id,DATA 
FROM things
WHERE id = @id
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You can create a view

CREATE VIEW all_records
AS
SELECT * from current
UNION ALL
SELECT * from archive

and select record from view:

select * from all_records
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I can suggest this variant

select coalesce((select someData from One where Id = 12345), (select someData from Two where Id = 12345))
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