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I want to select something conditionally based on whether a bit field is true or false. This was the syntax that I originally tried:

CASE WHEN isSoon THEN 'Soon' ELSE 'Not so soon' END As HowSoon

This makes sense to me since what follows the "WHEN" has to be a boolean expression, which isSoon is, as it's a bit field. However, this didn't work. What I had to do in the end was:

CASE WHEN isSoon = 1 THEN 'Soon' ELSE 'Not so soon' END As HowSoon

This seems redundant to me... It's like writing if(isSoon == True) in a programming language instead of the more intuitive if(isSoon) and goes against the grain. Why is SQL set up like this? Is it because bit fields aren't truly boolean?

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Can you also say what database provider you're using? MySQL doesn't seem to have a problem with that. –  Alin Purcaru Dec 2 '10 at 13:04
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This bugs me too, but sql isnt set up that way. Just in the same way that you cannot use a calculation when you pass a parameter to a SP (for ex you cannot do exec ListPermissionsByUser @DomainName + '\' + @UserName) –  Raj More Dec 2 '10 at 13:05

1 Answer 1

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Because the bit datatype is not a boolean type, it's a datatype used to optimize the bit storage.

The fact that the string "true" and "false" can be converted to a bit can be misleading, however, quoting from MSDN , a bit is "An integer data type that can take a value of 1, 0, or NULL."

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This does not seem to answer the WHY of it. Yeah it is a 1, 0 or null. But that is just a nullable boolean (assuming the column allows nulls). WHY did the SQL folks decide to treat it like a supersmallint rather than as the bool that it represents and is used as 99.9999% of the time. –  Vaccano Jun 17 '13 at 20:28
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@Vaccano: It is answer actually. Data type with 3 possible states (nullable bool - bit in SQL case) is very different from data type with 2 possible states (bool) –  Michal Levý Feb 24 '14 at 18:35

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