Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Ok, for the example, I have three tables:

**Table A**
id (serial)
timestamp (timestamp)
value1 (double)
value2 (double)

**Table B**
id (serial)
timestamp (timestamp)
text1 (text)
char1 (character)

**Table C**
id (serial)
timestamp (timestamp)
int1 (int)
int2 (int)

The id fields are unique to each table, and act as primary keys. Timestamps are entered when rows are placed in the table, but are not connected to the other tables, and each table can have rows inserted at varying times.

What I want is a view, or a single dataset, that contains all the records from each of the tables, sorted by timestamp.

In this example, this would mean that the dataset would have the following columns:

**Output Table**
timestamp (timestamp)
value1 (double)
value2 (double)
text1 (text)
char1 (character)
int1 (int)
int2 (int)

I understand that for each row of this resulting dataset, 4 of the columns would be empty. However, I need to be able to view the data from all of the tables sorted in timestamp order (and for a given timestamp range)

I've looked at unions, but they want common column datatypes, so that didn't fit. Joins appeared to need a connection between columns in one table and another, so that didn't fit.

I just need to create a table, made up of all the columns of the three tables, using a single one (timestamp) as a common sorting column.

What would be the best way of going about this? Is this even possible in SQL?

My initial idea was to extract the data from each table separately into an array (PHP/C++), then perform a sort there, but this appears to be incredibly slow, so I was hoping for a much faster SQL solution.

Note: The tables could have many thousand entries each. My database is in PostgreSQL if it is relevant.

share|improve this question
add comment

4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Following code does what you need, and also takes care of different collations between columns. Solution is MySQL specific (due to CAST function being used, and having collation-related problems).

SELECT * FROM (
SELECT
    `timestamp`,
    CAST(`value1` AS CHAR) AS `value1`,
    CAST(`value2` AS CHAR) AS `value2`,
    CAST(NULL AS CHAR) AS `text1`,
    CAST(NULL AS CHAR) AS `char1`,
    CAST(NULL AS SIGNED) AS `int1`,
    CAST(NULL AS SIGNED) AS `int2`
FROM `table_a`
UNION
SELECT
    `timestamp`,
    CAST(NULL AS CHAR) AS `value1`,
    CAST(NULL AS CHAR) AS `value2`,
    CAST(`text1` AS CHAR) AS `text1`,
    CAST(`char1` AS CHAR) AS `char1`,
    CAST(NULL AS SIGNED) AS `int1`,
    CAST(NULL AS SIGNED) AS `int2`
FROM `table_b`
UNION
SELECT
    `timestamp`,
    CAST(NULL AS CHAR) AS `value1`,
    CAST(NULL AS CHAR) AS `value2`,
    CAST(NULL AS CHAR) AS `text1`,
    CAST(NULL AS CHAR) AS `char1`,
    CAST(`int1` AS SIGNED) AS `int1`,
    CAST(`int2` AS SIGNED) AS `int2`
FROM `table_c`) `table_all`
ORDER BY `timestamp`

Also, the fact that you can do it, doesn't mean that you should do it. Better try to rearrange, (de)normalize your data, otherwise you might be running into similar issues over and over again. Sorting many rows in UNION result set is everything but efficient...

share|improve this answer
    
Unfortunately, the data is being generated by external applications that I have no control over, and I just have to 'deal' with their lack of forethought (as ever). :( –  Dave Dec 2 '10 at 14:20
add comment

You can add the missing columns manually with union:

SELECT * FROM(
    SELECT timestamp, value1, value2, null as text1, null as char1, null as int1, null as int2 FROM tableA
    union all
    SELECT timestamp, null, null, text1, char1, null, null FROM tableB
    union all
    SELECT timestamp, null, null, null, null, int1, int2 FROM tableC
) ORDER BY timestamp;
share|improve this answer
add comment

Use a Union, but add additional columns so that each composite table has the same signature.

Select id, timestamp, value1, value2, 
   Cast(null as text) text1,
   Cast(null as char(1)) char1,
   Cast(null as int) int1,
   Cast(null as int) int2 From Table1
 Union
Select id, timestamp, 
   Cast(null as double) value1, 
   Cast(null as double) value2, 
   text1, car1,
   Cast(null as int) int1,
   Cast(null as int) int2 From Table2
 Union
Select id, timestamp, 
   Cast(null as double) value1, 
   Cast(null as double) value2, 
   Cast(null as text) text1,
   Cast(null as char(1)) char1,
   int1, int2 From Table3
Order By Timestamp   
share|improve this answer
add comment

A full outer join on timestamp would work as well as the union examples. Dunno about performance, but the query is shorter.

select
  coalesce(a.timestamp, b.timestamp. c.timestamp) timestamp,
  .. fields here ..
from
  tablea a
  full outer join tableb b on a.timestamp = b.timestamp
  full outer join tablec c on c.timestamp = a.timestamp
order by
  1
share|improve this answer
    
The timstamps from each table don't match each other, so the outer join wouldn't work, would it? –  Dave Dec 2 '10 at 14:18
    
A full outer would, that's why I picked it. –  Donnie Dec 2 '10 at 14:49
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.