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I'm looking for String extension methods for TrimStart() and TrimEnd() that accept a string parameter.

I could build one myself but I'm always interested in seeing how other people do things.

How can this be done?

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2  
Your question is not very clear. What should the string parameter do exactly in a trim function? (Assuming that you are not referring to the mandatory 'this string' syntax of the extension method) –  asawyer Dec 2 '10 at 14:14
1  
So you want two functions with the same functionality as TrimStart/TrimEnd | Or you want one that will strip the input characters from the start/end? –  Blam Dec 2 '10 at 14:15
    
Yes, same functionality as TrimStart and TrimEnd, but accepts a string instead of a char. –  Mike Cole Dec 2 '10 at 14:15
    
And why you want that? –  Saurabh Dec 2 '10 at 14:16
    
String in .Net has Trim, TrimEnd and TrimStart, do you not want to use them? or are you wanting to see how this might be done as a learning exercise? –  jwwishart Dec 2 '10 at 14:17
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7 Answers 7

up vote 27 down vote accepted

TrimStart:

public static string TrimStart(this string target, string trimChars)
{
    return target.TrimStart(trimChars.ToCharArray());
}

TrimEnd:

public static string TrimEnd(this string target, string trimChars)
{
    return target.TrimEnd(trimChars.ToCharArray());
}

Note that this function will trim any of the characters in trimChars from the start/end of target, e.g. "foobar;'@".TrimEnd(";@'") will return "foobar"

If instead the intention is to trim all occurrences of the (exactly matching) string, then you should use something like the following:

TrimStart:

public static string TrimStart(this string target, string trimString)
{
    string result = target;
    while (result.StartsWith(trimString))
    {
        result = result.Substring(trimString.Length);
    }

    return result;
}

TrimEnd:

public static string TrimEnd(this string target, string trimString)
{
    string result = target;
    while (result.EndsWith(trimString))
    {
        result = result.Substring(0, result.Length - trimString.Length);
    }

    return result;
}
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This is not a good solution since it also trims a partial match: "foobartes".TrimEnd("test".ToCharArray()) results in foobar. Imho it should only trim if you get an exact match. edit: quickfix: add a target.EndsWith(trimChars) check before trimming –  Contra Mar 28 '11 at 8:40
    
agreed, this doesn't sound like what the op was requesting. I was under the assumption they want to trim a certain string from the beginning of a larger string. Simply TrimStarting all of the chars in the string could remove cases where it does not match exactly. –  Tim May 19 '11 at 19:24
    
Perhaps the OP (who accepted the answer) would care to comment on his actual requirement, instead of everyone second-guessing what he meant (and downvoting the [accepted] answer) –  Patrick McDonald May 20 '11 at 15:20
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TrimStart and TrimEnd takes in an array of chars. This means that you can pass in a string as a char array like this:

var trimChars = " .+-";
var trimmed = myString.TrimStart(trimChars.ToCharArray());

So I don't see the need for an overload that takes a string parameter.

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Wow, that's embarrassing. I didn't realize that's how it worked. Thanks! –  Mike Cole Dec 2 '10 at 14:24
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I thought the question was trying to trim a specific string from the start of a larger string.

For instance, if I had the string "hellohellogoodbyehello", if you tried to call TrimStart("hello") you would get back "goodbyehello".

If that is the case, you could use code like the following:

string TrimStart(string source, string toTrim)
{
    string s = source;
    while (s.StartsWith(toTrim))
    {
        s = formatString.Substring(toTrim.Length - 1);
    }
    return s;
}

This wouldn't be super-efficient if you needed to do a lot of string-trimming, but if its just for a few cases, it is simple and gets the job done.

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from dotnetperls.com,

Performance

Unfortunately, the TrimStart method is not heavily optimized. In specific situations, you will likely be able to write character-based iteration code that can outperform it. This is because an array must be created to use TrimStart.

However: Custom code would not necessarily require an array. But for quickly-developed applications, the TrimStart method is useful.

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I'm assuming you mean that, for example, given the string "HelloWorld" and calling the function to 'trim' the start with "Hello" you'd be left with "World". I'd argue that this is really a substring operation as you're removing a portion of the string of known length, rather than a trim operation which removes an unknown length of string.

As such, we created a couple of extension methods named SubstringAfter and SubstringBefore. It would be nice to have them in the framework, but they aren't so you need to implement them yourselves. Don't forget to have a StringComparison parameter, and to use Ordinal as the default if you make it optional.

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If you did want one that didn't use the built in trim functions for whatever reasons, assuming you want an input string to use for trimming such as " ~!" to essentially be the same as the built in TrimStart with [' ', '~', '!']

public static String TrimStart(this string inp, string chars)
{
    while(chars.Contains(inp[0]))
    {
        inp = inp.Substring(1);
    }

    return inp;
}

public static String TrimEnd(this string inp, string chars)
{
    while (chars.Contains(inp[inp.Length-1]))
    {
        inp = inp.Substring(0, inp.Length-1);
    }

    return inp;
}
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while (target.StartsWith(param)) { target= target.Substring(param.Length); }

very inefficient though, because of all the new string objects being constructed.

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