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What are the best practices for handling strings in C++? I'm wondering especially how to handle the following cases:

  • File input/output of text and XML files, which may be written in different encodings. What is the recommended way of handling this, and how to retrieve the values? I guess, a XML node may contain UTF-16 text, and then I have to work with it somehow.

  • How to handle char* strings. After all, this can be unsigned or not, and I wonder how I determine what encoding they use (ANSI?), and how to convert to UTF-8? Is there any recommended reading on this, where the basic guarantees of C/C++ about strings are documented?

  • String algorithms for UTF-8 etc. strings -- computing the length, parsing, etc. How is this done best?

  • What character type is really portable? I've learned that wchar_t can be anything from 8-32 bit wide, making it no good choice if I want to be consistent across platforms (especially when moving data between different platforms - this seems to be a problem, as described for example in EASTL, look at item #13)

At the moment, I'm using std::string everywhere, with a small helper utility to convert to UTF-16 when calling Unicode-APIs, but I'm pretty sure that this is not really the best way. Using something like Qt's QString or the ICU String class seems to be right, but I wonder whether there is a more lightweight approach (i.e. if my char strings are ANSI encoded, and the subset of ANSI that is used is equal to UFT-8, then I can easily treat the data as UTF-8 and provide converters from/to UTF-8, and I'm done, as I can store it in std::string, unless there are problems with this approach).

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2 Answers 2

For a shorter answer, I would just recommend using UTF-16 for simplicity; Java/C#/Python 3.0 switched to that model exactly for simplicity. I've always expected wchar_t to be 16 or 32bit wide, and many platforms support that; indeed, APIs like wcrtomb() do not allow an implementation to support a shift state for wchar_t*, but since UTF-8 needs none, it may be used, while other encodings are ruled out.

Then, I answer the question about XML.

File input/output of text and XML files, which may be written in different encodings. What is the recommended way of handling this, and how to retrieve the values? I guess, a XML node may contain UTF-16 text, and then I have to work with it somehow.

I'm not sure, but I don't think so. Mixing two encodings in the same file is asking for trouble and data corruption. Encoding a file in UTF-16 is usually a bad choice since most programs rely on using ASCII everwhere. The issue is: an XML file might use any single encoding, maybe even UTF-16, but then also the initial encoding declaration has to use UTF-16, and even the tags then. The problem I see with UTF-16 is: how should one reliable parse the initial declaration? The answer comes in the specification:, § 4.3.3:

In the absence of information provided by an external transport protocol (e.g. HTTP or MIME), it is a fatal error for an entity including an encoding declaration to be presented to the XML processor in an encoding other than that named in the declaration, or for an entity which begins with neither a Byte Order Mark nor an encoding declaration to use an encoding other than UTF-8. Note that since ASCII is a subset of UTF-8, ordinary ASCII entities do not strictly need an encoding declaration.

When reading that, note that also an XML file is an entity, called the document entity; in general, an entity is a storage unit for the document. From the whole specification, I'd say that only one encoding declaration is allowed for each entity, and I'd convert all entities to UTF-16 when reading them for easier handling.

Webography:

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Encoding everything to UTF-16 at runtime seems like a bit of a waste, doesn't it? I assume that I'll have to do it for each string literal, or prefix them all with L so they are wide by default (but L itself does not imply it's going to be UTF-16, so I still may need conversion). Any ideas? –  Anteru Jan 12 '09 at 11:00
    
Java used UCS-2 for simplicity. It was a fixed-width encoding at the time. –  dan04 Jan 8 '11 at 18:59

String algorithms for UTF-8 etc. strings -- computing the length, parsing, etc. How is this done best?

mbrlen gives you the length of a C string. I don't think std::string can be used for multibyte strings, you should use wstring for wide ones.

In general, you should probaby stick with UTF-16 inside your program and use UTF-8 only on I/O (I don't know well other options, but they are surely more complex and error-prone).

How to handle char* strings. After all, this can be unsigned or not, and I wonder how I determine what encoding they use (ANSI?), and how to convert to UTF-8? Is there any recommended reading on this, where the basic guarantees of C/C++ about strings are documented?

Basically, you can use any encoding, and you will happen to use the native encoding of the system on which you are running on, as long as it's an 8-bit encoding. C was born for ASCII, and locale handling was an afterthought. For years, each system understood mostly one native encoding, say ISO-8859-x, and files from another encoding could even be non-representable.

Since for UTF-8 strings one byte is not always one character, I guess that the safest bet is to use multibyte string for them. The C manuals I used described multibyte string in abstract, without details on those issues (in particular, on the used encoding). For C, see functions like mbrlen and mbrtowc. On my Linux system, it is noted that their behaviour depends on LC_CTYPE, and this probably means that the native type of multibyte strings. From the documentation it can be inferred that their API supports also encodings where you can shift from one-byte to two-bytes and back.

How to handle char* strings. After all, this can be unsigned or not,

If you rely on signedness of char, you're doing it wrong. Signedness of chars only matters if you use char as a numeric type, and then you should always use either unsigned or signed chars; in fact, you should pretend that plain char is neither unsigned nor signed, and that an expression like a > 0 (if a is a char) has undefined semantics. But what would it be useful for, anyway?

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Well, it's not about whether I treat char as unsigned or signed, the question is, can this make any problems? As seen in the EASTL stuff, they obviously had problems with that. –  Anteru Jan 12 '09 at 10:48

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