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I have defined this type :

  type state= L of state_simple * int | N of state * int |  State of int 

if I only need the integer of "State" What should I do?

here is the code:

   let prove state ch a =

  (*"state" is of type State st, i need the integer st*)
   let (_,p,suc,_) =game.(i) in

   let x = ref[] in
   let y = ref(Variable a.(suc.(0)) )in
   let l = Array.length suc in 

   x :=a.(suc.(0)) :: !x;

   if (p=0) then 
      (if (l <> 1) then
           (for i=1 to l-1 do 
               x := ((a.(suc.(i))) :: !x)
           done;

  !x;;
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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I would first recommend trying to better understand immutability and functional techniques as you don't need references for a lot of what you are doing. Here is how I would get the integer:

let prove st ch a =

  let i = match st with
   | State x -> x
   | L _ | N _ -> assert false (* or raise an exception *)
  in
   let (_,p,suc,_) =game.(i) in

   let x = ref[] in
   let y = ref(Variable a.(suc.(0)) )in (* are you using y anywhere? *)
   let l = Array.length suc in 

   x :=a.(suc.(0)) :: !x;

   if (p=0) then 
      (if (l <> 1) then
           (for i=1 to l-1 do 
               x := ((a.(suc.(i))) :: !x)
           done;

  !x;;

You don't seem to be using y, I'm not sure if that's due to a typo or something else. Also you can construct your list x functionally using recursion:

let prove st ch a =

  let i = match st with
   | State x -> x
   | L _ -> assert false (* or raise an exception *)
   | N _ -> assert false
  in
   let (_,p,suc,_) =game.(i) in

   let l = Array.length suc in 

   let rec loop x lst =
     if x >= l then
       lst
     else
       loop (x+1) (a.(suc.(i)) :: lst)
   in
   if (p=0) && (l <> 1) then 
     loop 1 [a.(suc.(0))]
   else
     []

EDIT: After reading through some comments, it sounds like you are confused about what constitutes a type in OCaml.

type state= L of state_simple * int | N of state * int |  State of int

creates a new type called state. State(2) and N(State(3), 2) have the same type, but different values. If I write a function with the signature val f : state -> int (that is, a function named f that takes a state and returns an int), I can pass that function State(2) or N(N(State(3), 4), 2) or anything else.

Since you want the function prove to only accept a state whose value is State(x), you might want to rethink the way you are calling prove. Maybe prove should just take an int instead of a state, and the caller of prove can do the pattern matching.

If this is too cumbersome (prove is called in multiple places) then having the match statement in the function makes sense, as long as bad matches (L_ and 'N_') are handled properly.

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If I've understood You correctly, something like:

match foo with
| State i -> do_something_with_integer i
| _ -> ()
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What does it mean : | _ -> () to say that in other cases should not do anything? –  Tanuzzo88 Dec 2 '10 at 15:55
    
"_" means a wildcard, or "any value"; "()" is unit, or empty function; the whole expression can be translated to "do nothing on any other match" –  barti_ddu Dec 2 '10 at 16:01
    
It returns () in cases where State i doesn't match. That means whatever you do in do_something_with_integer i must also return (). –  stonemetal Dec 2 '10 at 16:03
1  
@Antonio: as @stonemetal said, return type of both matches should be the same –  barti_ddu Dec 2 '10 at 16:05
2  
@Antonio: I have a feeling that You are mixing records with variant types (correct me, if I'm wrong). In the first place why did You create state type, what is its purpose? –  barti_ddu Dec 2 '10 at 16:47

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