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#!/bin/bash

i="0"

echo ""
echo "##################"
echo "LAUNCHING REQUESTS"
echo "  COUNT:  $2 "
echo "  DELAY:  $3 "
echo "  SESSID: $1"
echo "##################"
echo ""

while [ $2 -gt "$i" ]
do
  i=$[$i+1]
  php avtest.php $1 $4 &
  echo "EXECUTING REQUEST $i"
  sleep $3
done

here is a better/modified script in bash


#!/bin/bash

i="0"
#startTime=`date +%s`
startTime=$(date -u +%s)
startTime=$[$startTime+$1+5]
#startTime=$($startTime+$1+5)
dTime=`date -d @$startTime`
echo ""
echo "##################"
echo "LAUNCHING REQUESTS"
echo "  COUNT:  $1 "
echo "  DELAY:  1 "
#echo "  EXECUTION:  $startTime "
echo "  The scripts will fire at :  $dTime "
echo "##################"
echo ""

while [ $1 -gt "$i" ]
do
  i=$[$i+1]
  php avtestTimed.php $1 $3 $startTime &
  echo "QUEUEING REQUEST $i"
  sleep 1
done

share|improve this question
3  
Which bit is giving you trouble? And wouldn't it make more sense to convert to PHP and merge it with avtest.php so that you aren't spawning many, many processes? –  Quentin Dec 2 '10 at 18:40
    
i am stuck with perl since i am using rrdtool to plot the output. There might be a php API for RRDtool, but most of the examples are in perl –  kamal Dec 2 '10 at 19:13
    
but there's nothing in this script which involves RRDtool; it's simply a launcher script. You could write it in any language. –  Sorpigal Dec 2 '10 at 19:16
    
correct, my reason is to have one script that does it all :) since this is a tool to be used by many people. –  kamal Dec 2 '10 at 19:25
    
startTime=$(($startTime + $1 + 5)) or (( startTime += $1 + 5 )) and i=$((i + 1)) or (( i++ )) (double parentheses, not single) –  Dennis Williamson Dec 2 '10 at 23:24
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1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Here's a direct translation

#!/usr/bin/env perl
use strict;
use warnings;

print <<HERE;
##################
LAUNCHING REQUESTS
  COUNT:  $ARGV[1]
  DELAY:  $ARGV[2]
  SESSID: $ARGV[0]
##################
HERE

my $i = 0;
while($ARGV[1] > $i){
    $i += 1;
    system("php avtest.php $ARGV[0] $ARGV[3] &");
    print "EXECUTING REQUEST $i\n";
    sleep $ARGV[2];
}

But it would make more sense to read the command line parameters into variables named after what they're for and not rely on remembering argument ordering.

A brief errata in the conversion:

I use a here string to represent multiline text. I could also have put in multiple print statements to more closely mimic the bash version

In bash arguments are accessed as numbered variables, starting with $1 and going up. In Perl the argument list is represented by the array @ARGV, which is numbered starting at zero (like arrays in most languages). In both bash and Perl the name of the script can be found in the variable $0.

In Perl arrays are written as @arrayname when refering to the entire array, but they use $arrayname[index] when accessing array members. So the Perl $list[0] is like the bash ${list[0]} and the Perl @list is like the bash ${list[@]}.

In Perl variables are declared with the my keyword; the equivalent in bash would be declare.

I've used the system function for spawning background processes. Its argument can be simply the command line as you might use it in bash.

Unlike echo, print requires to be told if there should be a newline at the end of the line. For recent versions of Perl the say function exists which will append a newline for you.

The Perl sleep function is pretty self-explanatory.

EDIT: Due to a typo $i in the print statement had been represented as $ni leading to runtime errors. This has been corrected.

share|improve this answer
    
getting error, after corecting -ni to $n –  kamal Dec 2 '10 at 19:57
    
here is the error: <pre> Use of uninitialized value in concatenation (.) or string at ./loadAVTimed.pl line 17. EXECUTING REQUEST 1 Argument "ssotest.yakabod.net" isn't numeric in sleep at ./loadAVTimed.pl line 19. </pre> –  kamal Dec 2 '10 at 19:58
    
That sounds like it's being run with the wrong arguments. What did it print as the "DELAY:"? –  Gordon Davisson Dec 2 '10 at 20:30
    
@kamal: The first error was due to a typo. I have edited the above code to correct it. The second error is correctly diagnosed by Gordon. –  Sorpigal Dec 2 '10 at 20:56
    
./loadAVTimed.pl 10 0 example.httpshostname.com, where 10 is supposed to be the number of requests (COUNT) and 0 being the delay, but it seems to be reversed –  kamal Dec 2 '10 at 21:04
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