Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am getting an segmentation fault when I pass the double pointers to the function to initialize the memory

int main()
{
    double **A;
    initialize(A, 10, 10);
 ......
}

void initialize(double **A, int r, int c)
{
   A = (double **)malloc(sizeof(double *)*r);
   for(int i = 0; i< r; i++) {
        A[i] = (double *)malloc(sizeof(double) *c);
        for(int j = 0; j < c; j++) {
            A[i][j] = 0.0;
        }
   }
}

How can I pass the double pointers to the functions.....

share|improve this question
1  
try initialize(&A, 10, 10) –  eDev Dec 2 '10 at 19:56
    
That won't compile without changing initialize -- &A is a double***. –  Stuart Golodetz Dec 2 '10 at 20:01

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

If you want to modify a pointer to pointer you need to pass a pointer to pointer to pointer.

void func(double ***data) { *data = malloc(sizeof(double*)*10); for.... };
double ** data; func(&data);
share|improve this answer
    
Just revisiting my C: if you want to modify a pointer in C, you need to pass a pointer to a pointer. If you need to modify a pointer to a pointer, you need to pass a pointer to a pointer to a pointer. Why? So can we say, if we want to modify a value, we also need to pass a pointer to that value? Please explain more. Thanks in advance. –  Unheilig Jan 7 at 21:38

Like others have said, you need to take a pointer to pointer to pointer in your init function. This is how the initialize function changes:

void initialize(double ***A, int r, int c)
{
   *A = (double **)malloc(sizeof(double *)*r);
   for(int i = 0; i< r; i++) {
        (*A)[i] = (double *)malloc(sizeof(double) *c);
        for(int j = 0; j < c; j++) {
            (*A)[i][j] = 0.0;
        }
   }
}

And main will be:

int main()
{
    double **A;
    initialize(&A, 10, 10);
}

Also, the code as you posted it should cause no segmentation fault when passing the A pointer in. The segmentation fault most likely occurs when you return from the function and try to access A, because the A in main will not have been initialized. Only a copy of it is initialized the way you do it, and that copy is local to the initialize function, so it's lost when you return.

share|improve this answer
    
@LVlad Hi, nice answer. Just revisiting my C: if you want to modify a pointer in C, you need to pass a pointer to a pointer. If you need to modify a pointer to a pointer, you need to pass a pointer to a pointer to a pointer. Why? So can we say, if we want to modify a value, we also need to pass a pointer to that value? Please explain more. Thanks in advance. –  Unheilig Jan 7 at 21:37

Well for one thing, the A inside initialize is a copy of the A in main -- so when you get back to main, its A is still uninitialized. If you try and use it -- boom!

To pass it to initialize 'by reference', you need to change the parameter type to double*** and pass in &A in main. Then, when you use it in initialize, you need to dereference it each time, i.e. *A.

share|improve this answer
  1. You are not checking for out of memory errors. Fail.

  2. You pass BY VALUE an uninitialized value A to initialize() and then initialize that. But back in main(), that local variable A is still uninitialized. Instead you might have initialize() return the double** (e.g. A = initialize(...)) or modify initialize() so its first formal parameter is a double ***pA that you initialize with *pA = (double**)malloc(...);

share|improve this answer
    
Re. (1), fair point, but how many toy programs like this have ever run out of memory? –  Stuart Golodetz Dec 2 '10 at 19:59
    
And re. (2), you seem to be missing some levels of indirection... –  Stuart Golodetz Dec 2 '10 at 20:00
    
Well, do you want to counsel beginners to check for out of memory conditions or do you want them to learn to write fragile software?No. If he wants A to be initialized as an out parameter of initialize(), he needs to pass in a double***, which is then used as (*pA) wherever A appeared in the original –  Jan Gray Dec 2 '10 at 20:27

This is the kind of thing you do not want to do. Instead of unnecessarily using an out argument for this, allocate in the function and return the result. Do this instead:

int main() 
{
    double **A;
    A = initialize(A10, 10);
}

double** initialize(int r, int c)
{
   double **A;
   A = malloc(sizeof(double *)*r);
   for(int i = 0; i< r; i++) {
        A[i] = (double *)malloc(sizeof(double) *c);
        for(int j = 0; j < c; j++) {
            A[i][j] = 0.0;
        }
   }
  return A;
}
share|improve this answer
    
You forgot to update the return type of initialize, and to actually return a value. –  Karl Knechtel Dec 2 '10 at 20:14

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.