Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Im running into some issues with floating point arithmetic not being accurate. I'm trying to calculate a score based on a weighted formula where every input variable weighs about as much as 20 times the next significant one. The inputs however are real numbers, so I ended up using a double to store the result. The code below has the problem of losing the difference between E1 and E2.

This code is performance sensitive, so I need to find an efficient answer to this problem. I thought of multiplying my inputs by a hundred and then using an int (since that would be precise enough I think), but I doubt that is the best solution, hence the question.

#include <iostream>

int main()
{
    double score1, score2;
    float a      =       2.75    ;
    float b      =       5.25    ;
    float c      =       5.25    ;
    float d         =       2.75    ;
    float E1        =       3       ;
    float E2        =       6       ;


    score1 = 20 * b - 1 * a + 0.05 * d  /* - 0.0025 * c*/ + 0.0001 * E1 ;
    score2 = 20 * b - 1 * a + 0.05 * d  /* - 0.0025 * c*/ + 0.0001 * E2 ;

    std::cout << score1 << std::endl;
    std::cout << score2 << std::endl;

    std::cin.get();
    return 0;
}

//ouputs:
//102.388
//102.388
share|improve this question
    
floating point is limited, i.e. it cannot represent ALL the floating point numbers, there's a lot of info about it. –  Drakosha Dec 2 '10 at 20:20
1  
You could use double. There is limited utility in limiting yourself to float (apart from storage space which unless you are in very specific situations should not be a problem). –  Loki Astari Dec 2 '10 at 20:24
add comment

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted
  1. you are not outputting the entire value, use cout << setprecision(number_of_digits) << score1 << endl;
  2. how many valid digits do you need in your score computation?
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, setting a higher precision I do see correct values now, does that mean that my code is actually working as expected when I compare scores like if( score1 < score2 ) –  nus Dec 2 '10 at 20:25
    
Well, yes comparing two floats will compare their value. –  Let_Me_Be Dec 2 '10 at 20:31
    
sorry if Im being dumb, but if you see wrong values in a debug log, the first thing to assume is that they are actually wrong, especially if this would explain the bug you are looking for. –  nus Dec 2 '10 at 20:38
add comment

I thought of multiplying my inputs by a hundred and then using an int (since that would be precise enough I think), but I doubt that is the best solution

Given the values you've shown, I would say it is.

share|improve this answer
    
Actually multiplying the inputs by 100 wouldn't work - not all the calculations would result in integers even if the inputs are integers. You'd have to multiply the inputs by 10000 or 1000000 and change the constants in the calculation. –  Mark Byers Dec 2 '10 at 20:21
add comment

http://ideone.com/qqTB3 shows you that the difference is not lost, but actually as big as you'd expect (up to floating point accuracy, which is 15 decimal digits for double).

share|improve this answer
    
+ 1 for introducing me to ideone.com –  nus Dec 2 '10 at 20:36
add comment

Lets see what is happening in this code:

score1 = 20 * b - 1 * a + 0.05 * d  /* - 0.0025 * c*/ + 0.0001 * E1 ;

// Multiplication division happens first:

float  tmp1 = static_cast<float>(20) * b;      // 20 cast to float.
float  tmp2 = static_cast<float>(1)  * a;      // 1  cast to float.
double tmp3 = 0.05   * static_cast<double>(d); // d converted to double as 0.05 is double
double tmp4 = 0.0001 * static_cast<double>(E1);// E1 cast to double as 0.0001 is double

// Addition and subtraction now happen
float  tmp5  = tmp1 - tmp2;
double tmp6  = static_cast<double>(tmp5) + tmp3; // tmp5 cast to double as tmp3 is a double.
double tmp7  = tmp6 + tmp4;
score1       = tmp7;

If we do this in our heads:

tmp1 = 105.0
tmp2 =   2.75
tmp3 =   0.1375
tmp4 =   0.0003
tmp5 = 107.75
tmp6 = 107.8875
tmp7 = 107.8878

The precision should hold for those values:
But when you print out the default precision for doubles is 3 decimal places.

std::cout << 107.8878;
> 107.888

So set the precision:

std::cout << std::setprecision(15) << 107.8878 << "\n";
> 107.8878
share|improve this answer
    
Hmm, that doesn't look very performant... Is there a better way? –  nus Dec 2 '10 at 20:37
    
What do you mean it does not look very perfomant (that's not a word). This is exactly how the compiler will generate code. The temporary variables will probably be registers and the optimizer is allowed to swap the order of the operations (to an extent) but this is exactly what the underlying code will do. –  Loki Astari Dec 2 '10 at 20:53
    
What I was trying to show is that most of your operations are done on doubles. So unless you have some very specific space requirements your variables should probably be double. –  Loki Astari Dec 2 '10 at 20:58
    
The floats are datamembers, and although the main issue is speed, space is also limited as this evaluates nodes in a big tree. –  nus Dec 2 '10 at 21:05
    
en.wiktionary.org/wiki/performant –  nus Dec 2 '10 at 21:07
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.