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Can anyone point me towards a definitive list of POSIX cancellation points?

I was just about to answer a question on stackoverflow and realised I didn't know my stuff well enough! In particular, are accept() and select() cancellation points? I have an old book that says no, but I've seen sites on the internet claim that they are. Confused!

I am also after a list of Linux cancellation points if that is different.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 15 down vote accepted

The POSIX 1003.1-2003 standard gives a list in the System Interfaces section, then General Information, then Threads (direct link courtesy of A. Rex). (Added: POSIX 1003.1-2008 is now available on the web (all 3872 pages of it, in PDF and HTML). You have to register (free). I got to it from the Open Group Bookstore.)

Cancellation Points

Cancellation points shall occur when a thread is executing the following functions:

  • accept()
  • aio_suspend()
  • clock_nanosleep()
  • close()
  • connect()
  • creat()
  • fcntl() (When the cmd argument is F_SETLKW)
  • fdatasync()
  • fsync()
  • getmsg()
  • getpmsg()
  • lockf()
  • mq_receive()
  • mq_send()
  • mq_timedreceive()
  • mq_timedsend()
  • msgrcv()
  • msgsnd()
  • msync()
  • nanosleep()
  • open()
  • pause()
  • poll()
  • pread()
  • pselect()
  • pthread_cond_timedwait()
  • pthread_cond_wait()
  • pthread_join()
  • pthread_testcancel()
  • putmsg()
  • putpmsg()
  • pwrite()
  • read()
  • readv()
  • recv()
  • recvfrom()
  • recvmsg()
  • select()
  • sem_timedwait()
  • sem_wait()
  • send()
  • sendmsg()
  • sendto()
  • sigpause()
  • sigsuspend()
  • sigtimedwait()
  • sigwait()
  • sigwaitinfo()
  • sleep()
  • system()
  • tcdrain()
  • usleep()
  • wait()
  • waidid()
  • waitpid()
  • write()
  • writev()


A cancellation point may also occur when a thread is executing the following functions:


  • access()
  • asctime()
  • asctime_r()
  • catclose()
  • catgets()
  • catopen()
  • closedir()
  • closelog()
  • ctermid()
  • ctime()
  • ctime_r()
  • dbm_close()
  • dbm_delete()
  • dbm_fetch()
  • dbm_nextkey()
  • dbm_open()
  • dbm_store()
  • dlclose()
  • dlopen()
  • endgrent()
  • endhostent()
  • endnetent()
  • endprotoent()
  • endpwent()
  • endservent()
  • endutxent()
  • fclose()
  • fcntl() (For any value of the cmd argument. [Presumably except F_SETLKW which is listed.]
  • fflush()
  • fgetc()
  • fgetpos()
  • fgets()
  • fgetwc()
  • fgetws()
  • fmtmsg()
  • fopen()
  • fpathconf()
  • fprintf()
  • fputc()
  • fputs()
  • fputwc()
  • fputws()
  • fread()
  • freopen()
  • fscanf()
  • fseek()
  • fseeko()
  • fsetpos()
  • fstat()
  • ftell()
  • ftello()
  • ftw()
  • fwprintf()
  • fwrite()
  • fwscanf()
  • getaddrinfo()
  • getc()
  • getc_unlocked()
  • getchar()
  • getchar_unlocked()
  • getcwd()
  • getdate()
  • getgrent()
  • getgrgid()
  • getgrgid_r()
  • getgrnam()
  • getgrnam_r()
  • gethostbyaddr()
  • gethostbyname()
  • gethostent()
  • gethostid()
  • gethostname()
  • getlogin()
  • getlogin_r()
  • getnameinfo()
  • getnetbyaddr()
  • getnetbyname()
  • getnetent()
  • getopt() (if opterr is non-zero.)
  • getprotobyname()
  • getprotobynumber()
  • getprotoent()
  • getpwent()
  • getpwnam()
  • getpwnam_r()
  • getpwuid()
  • getpwuid_r()
  • gets()
  • getservbyname()
  • getservbyport()
  • getservent()
  • getutxent()
  • getutxid()
  • getutxline()
  • getwc()
  • getwchar()
  • getwd()
  • glob()
  • iconv_close()
  • iconv_open()
  • ioctl()
  • link()
  • localtime()
  • localtime_r()
  • lseek()
  • lstat()
  • mkstemp()
  • mktime()
  • nftw()
  • opendir()
  • openlog()
  • pathconf()
  • pclose()
  • perror()
  • popen()
  • posix_fadvise()
  • posix_fallocate()
  • posix_madvise()
  • posix_openpt()
  • posix_spawn()
  • posix_spawnp()
  • posix_trace_clear()
  • posix_trace_close()
  • posix_trace_create()
  • posix_trace_create_withlog()
  • posix_trace_eventtypelist_getne
  • posix_trace_eventtypelist_rewin
  • posix_trace_flush()
  • posix_trace_get_attr()
  • posix_trace_get_filter()
  • posix_trace_get_status()
  • posix_trace_getnext_event()
  • posix_trace_open()
  • posix_trace_rewind()
  • posix_trace_set_filter()
  • posix_trace_shutdown()
  • posix_trace_timedgetnext_event(
  • posix_typed_mem_open()
  • printf()
  • pthread_rwlock_rdlock()
  • pthread_rwlock_timedrdlock()
  • pthread_rwlock_timedwrlock()
  • pthread_rwlock_wrlock()
  • putc()
  • putc_unlocked()
  • putchar()
  • putchar_unlocked()
  • puts()
  • pututxline()
  • putwc()
  • putwchar()
  • readdir()
  • readdir_r()
  • remove()
  • rename()
  • rewind()
  • rewinddir()
  • scanf()
  • seekdir()
  • semop()
  • setgrent()
  • sethostent()
  • setnetent()
  • setprotoent()
  • setpwent()
  • setservent()
  • setutxent()
  • stat()
  • strerror()
  • strerror_r()
  • strftime()
  • symlink()
  • sync()
  • syslog()
  • tmpfile()
  • tmpnam()
  • ttyname()
  • ttyname_r()
  • tzset()
  • ungetc()
  • ungetwc()
  • unlink()
  • vfprintf()
  • vfwprintf()
  • vprintf()
  • vwprintf()
  • wcsftime()
  • wordexp()
  • wprintf()
  • wscanf()


An implementation shall not introduce cancellation points into any other functions specified in this volume of IEEE Std 1003.1-2001.

The side effects of acting upon a cancellation request while suspended during a call of a function are the same as the side effects that may be seen in a single-threaded program when a call to a function is interrupted by a signal and the given function returns [EINTR]. Any such side effects occur before any cancellation cleanup handlers are called.

Whenever a thread has cancelability enabled and a cancellation request has been made with that thread as the target, and the thread then calls any function that is a cancellation point (such as pthread_testcancel() or read()), the cancellation request shall be acted upon before the function returns. If a thread has cancelability enabled and a cancellation request is made with the thread as a target while the thread is suspended at a cancellation point, the thread shall be awakened and the cancellation request shall be acted upon. However, if the thread is suspended at a cancellation point and the event for which it is waiting occurs before the cancellation request is acted upon, it is unspecified whether the cancellation request is acted upon or whether the cancellation request remains pending and the thread resumes normal execution.

Ugh! Can't get the table to work very well it looked OK in preview and nothing like a table afterwards. Look at the URL for the information! There are a lot of possible cancellation points.

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Here's a deep link to the right section: opengroup.org/onlinepubs/000095399/functions/… –  A. Rex Jan 12 '09 at 1:02
    
Ah, thanks. Now, how do you go about finding that? –  Jonathan Leffler Jan 12 '09 at 1:19
    
(I looked at page source - is that the best way? Only way?) –  Jonathan Leffler Jan 12 '09 at 1:22
    
Yeah, that's what I did. (Well, I first got out of their annoying frameset by right-clicking "Open frame in new tab." That way I get the HTML filename quickly.) You know, I deep-link often enough that it might be useful to have a browser extension that shows me all the possible link points ... –  A. Rex Jan 12 '09 at 1:24
    
Alternatively, we could have gone to the topical index opengroup.org/onlinepubs/000095399/idx/topic.html and it's a click away! –  A. Rex Jan 12 '09 at 1:25

See the pthread_cancel man page for further and fast info.

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Additional Info: since kernel 2.6, Linux has used the NPTL thread library which is POSIX compliant, so cancellation points should be as above for recent Linux implmentations.

http://www.ddj.com/linux-open-source/184406204

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