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how do you leave a function in the middle? i have a condition for leaving the function, but i dont know how to actually leave.

ex:

void a(int &num){
    if (num > 100){
        // leave function
    }
    num += a(num + 1);
}

i want to end the recursion, and i have to keep the function a void

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5  
What? a returns void, how can you do num += a(anything);? And how does num+1 bind to a non-const reference? Is there an int a(int num); somewhere, so that last call isn't directly recursive? Not that it matters in this case because I don't think it affects the answer, but in general you get better answers asking about real code. –  Steve Jessop Dec 2 '10 at 21:17
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8 Answers 8

void a(int &num){
    if (num > 100){
        return;
    }
    num += a(num + 1);
}

As pointed in the comments by Martin York, I jumped on the answer without considering every aspect of the question, and for that I apologize. What you want is probably :

int a(int num)
{
    if (num > 100)
         return num;
    return num + a(num + 1);
}
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1  
You can write num += a(num + 1); The function a() does not return a value. Please make sure it compiles before you post. –  Loki Astari Dec 2 '10 at 21:21
2  
Martin York: Don't you mean "you can't write num += a(num + 1);"? As you said, a() doesn't return a value. –  gablin Dec 2 '10 at 21:26
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Nothing stops you from putting a return in the middle of the function, although some people may argue that it's bad style.

The main motivation for that idea is that if you have multiple return points in your function it's more difficult to maintain the cleanup code, that will have to be spread at each return; however, using the modern RAII pattern (that is required if you want your code to be exception-safe) you should have no problems in having multiple exit points: the cleanup code (that is contained in the destructors of the resource-holding objects) will be called anyway.

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You can use return.

But you need a value:

int a(int num)
{
    if (num > 100)
    {
        return num;
    }
    num += a(num + 1);
    return num;
}
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3  
His function returns void. –  Puppy Dec 2 '10 at 21:11
1  
Not any more ;) –  Crazy Eddie Dec 2 '10 at 21:13
    
@DeadMG: Not when I copied it. The OP has chaged the question. –  Loki Astari Dec 2 '10 at 21:22
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void a(int num)
{
    if (num > 100)
    {
    }
    else
    {
        num += a(num + 1);
    }
}
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Since the function returns a value, a return statement with a value needs to be given:

int a(int num){
    if (num > 100){
        return 100;// leave function
    }
    num += a(num + 1);
    return num;
}

For functions not returning a value, use return;.

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You could use something like this. Notice that no return value is needed since it is a void function. and the void is very empty.

void a(int &num){
    if (num > 100){
        return;
    }
    num += a(num + 1);
 }

But I rather see the code sample above like this.

void a(int &num){
    if(!(num >100)){
        num += a(num + 1);
    }
}
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int a(int num){
    if (num > 100){
        return num;  // or return 100;
    }
    num += a(num + 1);
    return num;
}

By the way if your are using references (int &num) you can not pass num + 1 as parameter.

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Some people don't like to have more than one return statement in a function:

void a(..)
{
  if (...)
    goto end;
  ....
end:
  return;
}

I, on the other hand, think they're stupid.

Yes, I've seen it.

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They're certainly not looking too clever if that's their way of writing if (!(...)) { ... } return; –  Steve Jessop Dec 2 '10 at 21:16
    
Replacing a return with a goto is just... euch! –  gablin Dec 2 '10 at 21:27
    
Guess someone thinks this is the right way to do it. Sorry I bad mouthed your coding standard :p –  Crazy Eddie Dec 2 '10 at 21:34
    
Unfortunately I am working with coding guidelines that say exactly this (and it drives me up the wall as it makes writing the code a lot harder to get correct (as you release resources after end: and thus you must have everything initialized before the first goto (and it just makes things hard))). –  Loki Astari Dec 2 '10 at 21:40
    
Some coding guidelines make you wonder. Was it come up with before anyone thought of scope guarding? Bet you're not allowed to use exceptions too :p –  Crazy Eddie Dec 2 '10 at 21:45
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