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What I'm trying to do is (in a module I'm writing) export a function that works on a particular type in a state monad (in the example below, that type would be Foo). However I would like the user to be able to use the function in whatever MonadState type they wish: State.Lazy, State.Strict, StateT, etc. So it needs to be polymorphic in its outer state monad.

Here is an example of what I'd like to do:

EDITED with a better question:

import Control.Monad.State

data Foo a = Foo { cnt :: Int, val :: a }

--test :: State (Foo a) a           --  THIS WORKS
--test :: StateT (Foo a) Maybe a    --  ...SO DOES THIS
--  ... BUT INCLUDING THE FOLLOWING SIGNATURE GIVES AN ERROR:
test :: MonadState (Foo a) m => m a
test = modify (\(Foo i a)-> Foo (i+1) a) >> gets val

GHC complains that FlexibleInstances extension is required to define the type above. Is using that extension the correct way to define my function or is there a better way?

Thanks

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Something like this should probably work - I'm afraid I can't test it at the moment (and its getting unformatted): [_ test :: MonadState (Foo a) m => m a _] –  stephen tetley Dec 2 '10 at 21:33
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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Can't you just use the MonadState typeclass?

{-# LANGUAGE FlexibleContexts #-}
import Control.Monad.State

data Foo a = Foo { cnt :: Int, val :: a }


test :: MonadState (Foo a) m => m a
test = modify (\(Foo i a)-> Foo (i+1) a) >> gets val

It loads fine in GHCi.

EDIT: This is with MTL-2.0 and GHCi-7.0.1

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I should have included the type signature you supplied in my original post, but it got left out. Edited. I guess my real question then is whether this FlexibleContexts flag is the proper (or only) way to do this. –  jberryman Dec 3 '10 at 0:10
2  
Yes, I believe FlexibleContexts is necessary. It's been proposed to Haskell Prime and I'm betting is or will be supported by other Haskell compilers (jhc, uhc), so I wouldn't try too hard to avoid it. –  Thomas M. DuBuisson Dec 3 '10 at 0:12
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