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I have dynamic array in struct and a method that uses the dynamic array. The problem is that I get range violation error when I run the program. However when I create a new dynamic array inside the method, it works fine. The following code causes problem.

struct MyStr {
 int[] frontArr;

    this(int max = 10) {
         frontArr = new int[10];
    }

    void push(int x) {
         frontArr[0] = x;
    }
}

void main() {
    MyStr s;
    s.push(5);
}

However, this one works;

struct MyStr {
 int[] frontArr;

    this(int max = 10) {
         frontArr = new int[10];
    }

    void push(int x) {
         frontArr = new int[10]; // <---Add this line
         frontArr[0] = x;
    }
}

void main() {
    MyStr s;
    s.push(5);
}

I basically add that line to test the scope. It seems like the initialized FrontArr can't be seen in push(int x) method. Any explanation?

Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
    
What kind of problem are you having? –  stonemetal Dec 3 '10 at 2:52
    
Have you tried putting a writefln call into the constructor to make sure it's actually being executed? –  DK. Dec 3 '10 at 3:44
    
@DK That's a good idea. Yeah, the created constructor never get called. –  Nate Dec 3 '10 at 17:19

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Initialization of structs must be guaranteed. This is you do not want the default construction of a struct to throw an exception. For this reason D does not support default constructors in structs. Imagine if

MyStr s;

resulted in an exception being thrown. Instead D provides its own default constructor which initializes all fields to the init property. In your case you are not calling your constructor and just using the provided defaults which means frontArr is never initialized. You want something like:

void main() {
    MyStr s = MyStr(10);
    s.push(5);
}

It should probably be a compiler error to have default values for all parameters of a struct constructor. Bugzilla

share|improve this answer
    
That sounds right. Let me try it, and I'll let you know. Thanks! –  Nate Dec 3 '10 at 5:34
    
It works, awesome! –  Nate Dec 3 '10 at 17:20

I could be wrong(I haven't used D in a while so it is a bit rusty.) but FrontArr is an array and in your code sample you try to assign a pointer to an array to it. Dynamic arrays work like so(note copied a D tutorial found here)

int[] MyArray;
MyArray.length = 3;
share|improve this answer
    
Actually, (new int[10]) produces an array, not a pointer to an array. If it did, the code wouldn't compile at all. The code looks fine; all I can think of is that the constructor isn't being called for some strange reason. –  DK. Dec 3 '10 at 3:43
    
Thanks, @DK Looks like my knowledge of D is rustier than I thought. –  stonemetal Dec 3 '10 at 16:14

For whatever reason, D doesn't support struct constructors that don't require arguments, either use opCall or remove the default initializer on this()

struct MyStr {
    int[] frontArr;

    static MyStr opCall() {
        MyStr s;
        s.frontArr = new int[10];
        return s;
    }

    void push(int x) {
        frontArr[0] = x;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
It has to do with the fact that the init property of all types must be known at compile time. For structs, that would effectively be the default constructor. But because a constructor would be run at runtime, that doesn't work. So, whatever values the member variables are directly initialized to are used for init, and default constructors are disallowed. A static opCall() is one way to get around the problem. However, you'd have to do something like auto s = MyStr() rather than the MyStr s which is used in the code in the question. MyStr s will always use the init property. –  Jonathan M Davis Dec 3 '10 at 21:42

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