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I'm attempting to use Java Datagrams to create a packet stream between server and client. The problem is that, although I receive confirmation that packets are being sent, they are all lost before they reach the client listener I set up. I have it right now so that there's a timeout after 5 seconds, which happens every time I run it.

class DGServer extends Thread
{
    private DatagramSocket server;

    public DGServer() throws IOException
    {
        server = new DatagramSocket();
    }

    public void run()
    {
        try
        {
            server.connect(App.Local, 4200);
            System.out.println("Server starting...");

            int i = 0;

            while (server.isConnected() && (i < 256))
            {
                byte[] buffer = new byte[1];
                buffer[0] = (byte) ++i;
                DatagramPacket packet = new DatagramPacket(buffer, buffer.length, App.Local, 4200);
                System.out.println("Sedning " + i + " to client...");

                server.send(packet);

                Thread.sleep(500);
            }
        }
        catch (Exception e)
        {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
        System.out.println("Server Finished!");

        if (! server.isClosed())
            server.close();
    }

}

class DGClient extends Thread
{
    private DatagramSocket client;

    public DGClient() throws SocketException
    {
        client = new DatagramSocket();
    }

    public void run()
    {
        try
        {
            client.connect(App.Local, 4200);
            client.setSoTimeout(5000);
            System.out.println("Client starting...");

            int i = 0;

            while (client.isConnected() && (i < 256))
            {
                byte[] buffer = new byte[1];
                DatagramPacket packet;
                packet = new DatagramPacket(buffer, 1, App.Local, 4200);
                //System.out.println("Sedning " + i + " to server...");

                client.receive(packet);

                buffer = packet.getData();          
                System.out.println("Client Received:\t" + packet.getData()[0]);

                Thread.sleep(500);
            }
        }
        catch (Exception e)
        {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
        System.out.println("Client Finished!");

        if (! client.isClosed())
            client.close();
    }

}

You may choose to skim over the second class. They're widely the same, it just replaces server.send, with client.receive. Also, this class was not designed to really do anything important. So, a lot of the code(like, Exception handling), is written very simplistically.

Is there anything I can do to prevent the loss of packets? I have the port forwarded on my computer(not that it should matter, I'm using my localhost, which is App.Local in case you wondered).

Also, side question. I originally had it set up as a single class, coded to send a packet, then turn around and receive one. But it threw an exception because the 'ICMP Port is unreachable'. Does anyone know why this happens?

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How do you know they're being lost? Have you tried setting up a packet tracer like wireshark to see where they're going? –  javamonkey79 Dec 3 '10 at 1:10
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6 Answers

Ok first off, I think you are testing both the server and the client at the same time, so you don't have any idea whether which one fails.

You should use either netcat (nc) or wireshark to test the client

with netcat, you can run the following command

nc -l -u -p 4200 -vv

This will tell netcat to listen (-l) on udp (-u) on port (-p 4200) and be very verbose (-vv)

This way you'll be able to check if your client can connect to anything.

You can use the same program to check if your server can receive connections from a known working program with

nc -u [target ip] 4200

There is a netcat cheatsheet here

You can also check netcat to netcat to diagnose if it is purely a network issue. Maybe the firewalls/NAT aren't configured correctly

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Why both server and client doing a connect ? Shouldn't one side be sending the data ?

Something like :


DatagramSocket socket = new DatagramSocket();

DatagramPacket packet = new DatagramPacket(buf, buf.length, 
                                           address, 4200);
socket.send(packet);

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It sounds to me like there is some packet filter / firewall interfering with UDP traffic between the client and server on the port that you are using. It could be simple packet filtering, it could be NAT (which interferes with UDP traffic unless you take special steps), it could be some accidental network misconfiguration.

But it threw an exception because the 'ICMP Port is unreachable'. Does anyone know why this happens?

IMO, this is more evidence of packet filtering.

(However, its also a bit unexpected that you should receive this in response to trying to sent a datagram. I'd simply expect there to be no response at all, and any ICMP responses to a UDP request to have been dropped on the floor by the OS. But, I may be wrong about this ...

Now if you were using a regular stream socket; e.g. TCP/IP, this behaviour would be understandable.)

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It was in the following context; client.send(packet); client.receive(packet); It was actually on the receiving line. –  B3tturTh3nU Dec 3 '10 at 1:28
    
Maybe what is happening is that the OS is delivering the unexpected ICMP traffic back to the UDP datagram socket and it is being turned into an exception when you do the receive. Either way, this is evidence of packet filtering. –  Stephen C Dec 3 '10 at 1:33
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You're not binding the sending socket to a specific port number, so the client won't be able to send to it if connected. I suspect you have the same problem in reverse as well, i.e. the client socket isn't bound to port 4200. That would explain everything.

I would get rid of the connects and use explicit port numbers when sending, and the incoming port number when replying.

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If you are running both of them in the same machine this is never going to work because you are connecting both (server and client) to the same port.

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I am sure you are aware that UDP is a lossy proocol and you have allowed for this. Still you should expect to get some packets.

I suggest you test whether your program works by using the client and server on the same host and on different hosts, avoiding any firewalls. If this works then you have a network configuration issue.

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