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I am referring to the article Implementing a Subject/Observer pattern with templates

I did some modification and it became code as follow.

template <class T, class A>
class Observer {
public:
    Observer() {}
    virtual ~Observer() {}
    virtual void update(T& subject, A arg) = 0;
};

template <class T, class A>
class Subject
{
public:
    Subject() {}
    virtual ~Subject() {}

    // Take note that, we didn't make the following functions as virtual,
    // as we do not expect them to be overridden.
    void attach(Observer<T, A> &observer) {
        // Ensure no duplication.
        std::vector<Observer<T, A> *>::const_iterator iterator = std::find(observers.begin(), observers.end(), &observer);
        if (iterator == observers.end()) {
            observers.push_back(&observer);
        }
    }

    void dettach(Observer<T, A> &observer) {
        std::vector<Observer<T, A> *>::const_iterator iterator = std::find(observers.begin(), observers.end(), &observer);
        if (iterator != observers.end()) {
            observers.erase(iterator);
        }
    }

    void dettachAll() {
        observers.clear();
    }

    void notify(A arg)
    {
        std::vector<Observer<T, A> *>::const_iterator it;
        for (it = observers.begin(); it != observers.end(); it++) { 
            (*it)->update(*(static_cast<T *>(this)), arg);
        }
    }

private:
    std::vector<Observer<T, A> *> observers;
};

Later, I realize that (*it)->update(*(static_cast<T *>(this)), arg); is having limitation. For example,

// cause compilation error in static_cast, as it cannot cast cat1 to animal.
class cat1 : public animal, public Subject<animal, int> {
public:
    virtual void speak() {
        notify(888);
    }
};

class zoo1 : public Observer<animal, int> {
public:
    zoo1() {
        c.attach(*this);
        c.speak();
    }

    virtual void update(animal& subject, int arg) {
        cout << "zoo1 received notification " << arg << endl;
    }

    cat1 c;
};

I can solve the problem by changing the static_cast to dynamic_cast. However, I am not sure whether I will fall into other traps? My guess on author original intention in having static_cast, is to ensure type safety checking during compile time.

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1  
This appears to be answered here: Should I use dynamic cast in the subject observer pattern with templates –  User Dec 17 '11 at 0:41

2 Answers 2

Your problem come from the fact that animal should be the subject not only the cat,

class animal : public Subject<animal,int>
{
    ...
};

class cat1 : public animal
{
    public:
    virtual void speak() 
    {
        notify(888);
    }
};

class zoo1 : public Observer<animal, int> {
public:
    zoo1() 
    {
        c.attach(*this);
        c.speak();
    }

virtual void update(animal& subject, int arg) 
    {
        cout << "zoo1 received notification " << arg << endl;
    }

cat1 c;
};

By doing this every Subject are static-cast "able" to animal. This is not the case with your cat1

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As pointed out by Cyrs, in your example, the compiler tries to static_cast a Subject<animal, int>* into an animal* whereas neither animal nor Subject<animal, int> inherits the other one, even indirectly. The compiler considers this conversion as impossible.

If you replace static_cast by dynamic_cast, it will be evaluated at runtime if this conversion is possible. In your example, it is, because cat1 is luckily both an animal and an Observer<animal, int>. So it will always work with dynamic_cast if the user (developer) doesn't do any mistake, i.e. if he/she provides classes with this kind of hierarchy.

So you may want to make your implementation with dynamic_cast more robust and detect programming mistakes. With such a mistake, dynamic_cast will return a null pointer. So you could test if dynamic_cast returns a null pointer either in notify(), in attach() or in Subject(), and avoid using the pointer in that case.

Note that dynamic_cast is less efficient than static_cast because of runtime type evaluations.

I would rather go for Cyrs' solution.

As pointed out in a comment, you should also consider the accepted answer of following thread: Should I use dynamic cast in the subject observer pattern with templates, which is a nice alternative.

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