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I have some difficulties with mySQL commands that I want to do.

SELECT a.timestamp, name, count(b.name) 
FROM time a, id b 
WHERE a.user = b.user
  AND a.id = b.id
  AND b.name = 'John'
  AND a.timestamp BETWEEN '2010-11-16 10:30:00' AND '2010-11-16 11:00:00' 
GROUP BY a.timestamp

This is my current output statement.

timestamp            name  count(b.name)
-------------------  ----  -------------
2010-11-16 10:32:22  John  2
2010-11-16 10:35:12  John  7
2010-11-16 10:36:34  John  1
2010-11-16 10:37:45  John  2
2010-11-16 10:48:26  John  8
2010-11-16 10:55:00  John  9
2010-11-16 10:58:08  John  2

How do I group them into 5 minutes interval results?

I want my output to be like

timestamp            name  count(b.name)
-------------------  ----  -------------
2010-11-16 10:30:00  John  2
2010-11-16 10:35:00  John  10
2010-11-16 10:40:00  John  0
2010-11-16 10:45:00  John  8
2010-11-16 10:50:00  John  0
2010-11-16 10:55:00  John  11 
share|improve this question
    
possible duplicate of SELECT / GROUP BY - segments of time (10 seconds, 30 seconds, etc) –  Andriy M Feb 24 '12 at 20:58

7 Answers 7

This works with every interval

Postgresql

SELECT
    TIMESTAMP WITH TIME ZONE 'epoch' +
    INTERVAL '1 second' * round((extract('epoch' from timestamp) / 300) * 300) 
    as timestamp,
    name,
    count(b.name)
FROM time a, id 
WHERE …
GROUP BY 
round(extract('epoch' from timestamp) / 300), name

Mysql

SELECT
    timestamp,  -- not sure about that
    name,
    count(b.name)
FROM time a, id 
WHERE …
GROUP BY 
round(UNIX_TIMESTAMP(timestamp) / 300), name
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oh… didn't get the mysql-flag.. it's a postgresql-query .. but basically this should be possible with mysql, too –  boecko Dec 3 '10 at 12:02
2  
ok .. instead of extract .. GROUP BY round(UNIX_TIMESTAMP(timestamp) / 300) should do the trick –  boecko Dec 3 '10 at 12:07
    
This does not quite work in my case. I want the time to be grouped into 30 minute intervals on the hour and on the half hour - this does it on 45 min and 15 mins the following I would expect p1 and p2 to be in the same period but they are not instead p2 and p3 are in the same haven't figured out why just yet: mysql> select round(UNIX_TIMESTAMP('2013-03-14 13:44')/1800) as p1, round(UNIX_TIMESTAMP('2013-03-14 13:46')/1800) as p2, round(UNIX_TIMESTAMP('2013-03-14 14:05')/1800) as p3; p1=757371 p2=757372 p3=757372 | –  DavidC Mar 16 '13 at 17:45
1  
@pHiL's comment is correct on mySql you should use DIV instead of round(/) otherwise the boundry between intervals is wrong –  DavidC Mar 16 '13 at 17:56

You should rather use GROUP BY UNIX_TIMESTAMP(time_stamp) DIV 300 instead of round(../300) because of the rounding I found that some records are counted into two grouped result sets.

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THis is correct the round(../300) was not doing it properly on mySql –  DavidC Mar 16 '13 at 17:54

For postgres, I found it easier and more accurate to use the

date_trunc

function, like:

select name, sum(count), date_trunc('minute',timestamp) as timestamp
FROM table
WHERE xxx
GROUP BY name,date_trunc('minute',timestamp)
ORDER BY timestamp

You can provide various resolutions like 'minute','hour','day' etc... to date_trunc.

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This should be upvoted, it is the best answer. –  tmarthal Apr 1 '13 at 21:19
4  
@tmarthal - it shouldn't be upvoted. The original question was for mysql. –  buggedcom Apr 19 '13 at 21:08
10  
Where do you set the 5 here for the 5 minutes interval ? –  oldergod Jun 3 '13 at 0:56
    
For the above, change the WHERE clause to: WHERE timestamp > current_timestamp - interval '5 minutes' –  Luke Smith Aug 8 '14 at 12:31

The query will be something like:

SELECT 
  DATE_FORMAT(
    MIN(timestamp),
    '%d/%m/%Y %H:%i:00'
  ) AS tmstamp,
  name,
  COUNT(id) AS cnt 
FROM
  table
GROUP BY ROUND(UNIX_TIMESTAMP(timestamp) / 300), name
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, this worked as a charm. –  TJ B Jun 7 '13 at 16:00

You're probably going to have to break up your timestamp into ymd:HM and use DIV 5 to split the minutes up into 5-minute bins -- something like

select year(a.timestamp), 
       month(a.timestamp), 
       hour(a.timestamp), 
       minute(a.timestamp) DIV 5,
       name, 
       count(b.name)
FROM time a, id b
WHERE a.user = b.user AND a.id = b.id AND b.name = 'John' 
      AND a.timestamp BETWEEN '2010-11-16 10:30:00' AND '2010-11-16 11:00:00'
GROUP BY year(a.timestamp), 
       month(a.timestamp), 
       hour(a.timestamp), 
       minute(a.timestamp) DIV 12

...and then futz the output in client code to appear the way you like it. Or, you can build up the whole date string using the sql concat operatorinstead of getting separate columns, if you like.

select concat(year(a.timestamp), "-", month(a.timestamp), "-" ,day(a.timestamp), 
       " " , lpad(hour(a.timestamp),2,'0'), ":", 
       lpad((minute(a.timestamp) DIV 5) * 5, 2, '0'))

...and then group on that

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Hmmm... But the output isn't getting what I am trying to get. It returns one column and I not very sure what the value of the count is... –  sky Dec 3 '10 at 6:15

I found out that with MySQL probably the correct query is the following:

SELECT SUBSTRING( FROM_UNIXTIME( CEILING( timestamp /300 ) *300,  
                                 '%Y-%m-%d %H:%i:%S' ) , 1, 19 ) AS ts_CEILING,
SUM(value)
FROM group_interval
GROUP BY SUBSTRING( FROM_UNIXTIME( CEILING( timestamp /300 ) *300,  
                                   '%Y-%m-%d %H:%i:%S' ) , 1, 19 )
ORDER BY SUBSTRING( FROM_UNIXTIME( CEILING( timestamp /300 ) *300,  
                                   '%Y-%m-%d %H:%i:%S' ) , 1, 19 ) DESC

Let me know what you think.

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i came across the same issue.

I found that it is easy to group by any minute interval is just dividing epoch by minutes in amount of seconds and then either rounding or using floor to get ride of the remainder. So if you want to get interval in 5 minutes you would use 300 seconds.


    SELECT COUNT(*) cnt, 
    to_timestamp(floor((extract('epoch' from timestamp_column) / 300 )) * 300) 
    AT TIME ZONE 'UTC' as interval_alias
    FROM TABLE_NAME GROUP BY interval_alias

 
interval_alias       cnt
-------------------  ----  
2010-11-16 10:30:00  2
2010-11-16 10:35:00  10
2010-11-16 10:45:00  8
2010-11-16 10:55:00  11 

This will return the data correctly group by the selected minutes interval; however, it will not return the intervals that don't contains any data. In order to get those empty intervals we can use the function generate_series.





SELECT generate_series(MIN(date_trunc('hour',timestamp_column)),
max(date_trunc('minute',timestamp_column)),'5m') as interval_alias FROM TABLE_NAME

Result:

interval_alias       
-------------------    
2010-11-16 10:30:00  
2010-11-16 10:35:00
2010-11-16 10:40:00   
2010-11-16 10:45:00
2010-11-16 10:50:00   
2010-11-16 10:55:00   

Now to get the result with interval with zero occurrences we just outer join both result sets.


    SELECT series.minute as interval,  coalesce(cnt.amnt,0) as count from 
       (
       SELECT count(*) amnt,
       to_timestamp(floor((extract('epoch' from timestamp_column) / 300 )) * 300)
       AT TIME ZONE 'UTC' as interval_alias
       from TABLE_NAME  group by interval_alias
       ) cnt

    RIGHT JOIN 
       (    
       SELECT generate_series(min(date_trunc('hour',timestamp_column)),
       max(date_trunc('minute',timestamp_column)),'5m') as minute from TABLE_NAME 
       ) series

  on series.minute = cnt.interval_alias

The end result will include the series with all 5 minute intervals even those that have no values.

interval             count
-------------------  ----  
2010-11-16 10:30:00  2
2010-11-16 10:35:00  10
2010-11-16 10:40:00  0
2010-11-16 10:45:00  8
2010-11-16 10:50:00  0 
2010-11-16 10:55:00  11 

The interval can be easily changed by adjusting the last parameter of generate_series. In our case we use '5m' but it could be any interval we want.

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