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I am having a problem passing an NSError object back. The first line of code to access the object (in this case, I inserted an NSLog) causes "EXC_BAD_ACCESS".

Is this because I am not explicitly creating an NSError object, but rather getting one from the NSURLRequest and passing it back? In this particular function (downloadFile:), some errors I want to retrieve from other functions, but I create an NSError on two other occasions in the function.

Any help is appreciated.

Here is the offending code:

-(void)someCode {
NSError *err = nil;

localPool = [[NSAutoreleasePool alloc] init];

if (!iap) {
    iap = [[InAppPurchaseController alloc] init];
}

if (![self.iap downloadFile:@"XXXXX.plist" withRemoteDirectory:nil withLocalDelete:YES withContentType:@"text/xml" Error:&err] ) {
    //"EXC_BAD_ACCESS" on calling NSLog on the next line? 
    NSLog(@"Error downloading Plist: %@", [err localizedDescription]);

    [self performSelectorOnMainThread:@selector(fetchPlistFailed:) withObject:err waitUntilDone:NO];
    [localPool drain], localPool = nil;
    return NO;
}
//Removed the remainder of the code for clarity.

[localPool drain], localPool = nil;
return YES;
}


-(BOOL)downloadFile:(NSString *)fileName
withRemoteDirectory:(NSString *)remoteDirectory
 withLocalDelete:(BOOL)withLocalDelete
 withContentType:(NSString *)contentTypeCheckString
     Error:(NSError **)error {

UIApplication *app = [UIApplication sharedApplication];
app.networkActivityIndicatorVisible = YES; 

NSError *localError = nil;

NSAutoreleasePool *localPool = [[NSAutoreleasePool alloc] init];

NSString *urlString = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"http://XXXXX/%@", fileName];

NSLog(@"Downloading file: %@", urlString);

NSURL *url = [NSURL URLWithString:urlString];

NSURLRequest *req = [[NSURLRequest alloc] initWithURL:url];

NSHTTPURLResponse *response = nil;

NSData *responseData = [NSURLConnection sendSynchronousRequest:req returningResponse:&response error:&localError];

[req release];

if (response == nil || localError) {
    NSLog(@"Error retrieving file:%@", [localError localizedDescription]);
    if (error != NULL) {
        *error = localError;
        //THIS NSLog call works just fine.
        NSLog(@"Error copied is:%@", [*error localizedDescription]);
    }
 [localPool drain], localPool = nil;
 app.networkActivityIndicatorVisible = NO; 
 return NO;
}

//Rest of function omitted for simplicity.
}
share|improve this question
1  
One observation about your code not related to the problem: the way to check if sendSynchronousRequest: failed with an error is to check its return value was nil, not the response parameter. If responseData is nil, the error pointed to by localError will be a valid error message, otherwise you should ignore it. So your check on localError to see if it is nil is pointless and your check on response is incorrect. In fact, you might as well just pass in error as your NSError** and save the copying. –  JeremyP Dec 3 '10 at 9:19
    
Excellent catch and comment! I will make those changes you suggest. –  jschmidt Dec 3 '10 at 11:58

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I guess your NSError object is autoreleased and put on your localPool. You drained that localPool, thus destroying the NSError.

Do you really need localPool in every method? If not, just remove the localPools.

Also, it looks like you forgot to drain the localPool in someCode. Hopefully you just didn't copy it...

-(void)someCode {
    NSError *err = nil;

    localPool = [[NSAutoreleasePool alloc] init];

    if (!iap) {
        iap = [[InAppPurchaseController alloc] init];
    }

    if (![self.iap downloadFile:@"XXXXX.plist" withRemoteDirectory:nil withLocalDelete:YES withContentType:@"text/xml" Error:&err] ) {
             ....
            [localPool drain], localPool = nil;
            return NO;
    }
    [localPool drain], localPool = nil; // missing
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Good answer but I just want to ssay that if you create an autorelease pool and forget to drain it, it doesn't matter because when the parent pool is drained, it automatically drains all its surviving children too. –  JeremyP Dec 3 '10 at 9:13
    
Thanks Jeremy, I didn't know that. –  Yuji Dec 3 '10 at 9:31
    
Ah! That's it! You are right that I didn't copy all of the code. I've edited my question to reflect that. I drained the pool elsewhere in code. I will look at the code again, but it should be no problem to release to remove the local pool in this method. I'm still getting used to memory management in Objective-C. –  jschmidt Dec 3 '10 at 11:53

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