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What is the difference between List<? super T> and List<? extends T> ?

I used to use List<? extends T>, but it does not allow me to add elements to it list.add(e), whereas the List<? super T> allows.

I want to know the difference.

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1  
what is the type of e , full code would be helpful – Jigar Joshi Dec 3 '10 at 7:04
    
e is a subclass of T – Anand Dec 3 '10 at 8:19
1  
possible duplicate of Java Generics: What is PECS? – Harry Blargle Jul 21 '14 at 10:27
up vote 320 down vote accepted

extends

The wildcard declaration of List<? extends Number> foo3 means that any of these are legal assignments:

List<? extends Number> foo3 = new ArrayList<Number>();  // Number "extends" Number (in this context)
List<? extends Number> foo3 = new ArrayList<Integer>(); // Integer extends Number
List<? extends Number> foo3 = new ArrayList<Double>();  // Double extends Number
  1. Reading - Given the above possible assignments, what type of object are you guarenteed to read from List foo3:

    • You can read a Number because any of the lists that could be assigned to foo3 contain a Number or a subclass of Number.
    • You can't read an Integer because foo3 could be pointing at a List<Double>.
    • You can't read a Double because foo3 could be pointing at a List<Integer>.
  2. Writing - Given the above possible assignments, what type of object could you add to List foo3 that would be legal for all the above possible ArrayList assignments:

    • You can't add an Integer because foo3 could be pointing at a List<Double>.
    • You can't add a Double because foo3 could be pointing at a List<Integer>.
    • You can't add a Number because foo3 could be pointing at a List<Integer>.

You can't add any object to List<? extends T> because you can't guarantee what kind of List it is really pointing to, so you can't guarantee that the object is allowed in that List. The only "guarantee" is that you can only read from it and you'll get a T or subclass of T.

super

Now consider List <? super T >.

The wildcard declaration of List<? super Integer> foo3 means that any of these are legal assignments:

List<? super Integer> foo3 = new ArrayList<Integer>();  // Integer is a "superclass" of Integer (in this context)
List<? super Integer> foo3 = new ArrayList<Number>();   // Number is a superclass of Integer
List<? super Integer> foo3 = new ArrayList<Object>();   // Object is a superclass of Integer
  1. Reading - Given the above possible assignments, what type of object are you guaranteed to receive when you read from List foo3:

    • You aren't guaranteed an Integer because foo3 could be pointing at a List<Number> or List<Object>.
    • You aren't guaranteed an Number because foo3 could be pointing at a List<Object>.
    • The only guarantee is that you will get an instance of an Object or subclass of Object (but you don't know what subclass).
  2. Writing - Given the above possible assignments, what type of object could you add to List foo3 that would be legal for all the above possible ArrayList assignments:

    • You can add an Integer because an Integer is allowed in any of above lists.
    • You can add an instance of a subclass of Integer because an instance of a subclass of Integer is allowed in any of the above lists.
    • You can't add a Double because foo3 could be pointing at a ArrayList<Integer>.
    • You can't add a Number because foo3 could be pointing at a ArrayList<Integer>.
    • You can't add a Object because foo3 could be pointing at a ArrayList<Integer>.

PECS

Remember PECS: "Producer Extends, Consumer Super".

  • "Producer Extends" - If you need a List to produce T values (you want to read Ts from the list), you need to declare it with ? extends T, e.g. List<? extends Integer>. But you cannot add to this list.

  • "Consumer Super" - If you need a List to consume T values (you want to write Ts into the list), you need to declare it with ? super T, e.g. List<? super Integer>. But there are no guarantees what type of object you may read from this list.

  • If you need to both read from and write to a list, you need to declare it exactly with no wildcards, e.g. List<Integer>.

Example

Note this example from the Java Generics FAQ. Note how the source list src (the producing list) uses extends, and the destination list dest (the consuming list) uses super:

public class Collections { 
  public static <T> void copy(List<? super T> dest, List<? extends T> src) 
  {
      for (int i=0; i<src.size(); i++) 
        dest.set(i,src.get(i)); 
  } 
}

Also see How can I add to List<? extends Number> data structures?

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1  
I have a doubt here: If I need to add to a generic list and then get data from it, what should i do? – Anand Dec 3 '10 at 8:40
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as an example you can see Collections copy method public static <T> void copy(List<? super T> dest, List<? extends T> src) { @ docjar.com/html/api/java/util/Collections.java.html – AZ_ Feb 18 '13 at 15:06
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@BertF: great explanation.one correction (if it ) do you mean to sayList<? super Integer> foo3 instead of List<? super Number> foo3 below super ? – brain storm Feb 12 '14 at 23:00
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@BertF, Good clear explanation, at least 3405691582 times better than the explanation at doc.oracle – Pacerier Sep 10 '14 at 17:13
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I have reached this answer a couple of times. I whish I could vote more than once. Do you know that you are #1 in google search results? – rpax Apr 25 '15 at 21:12

Imagine having this hierarchy

enter image description here

1. Extends

By writing

    List<? extends C2> list;

you are saying that list will be able to reference an object of type (for example) ArrayList that contains one and only one of the 7 subtypes of C2 (C2 included):

  1. C2 (or subtypes): list = new ArrayList<C2>();, or
  2. D1 (or subtypes): list = new ArrayList<D1>();, or
  3. D2 (or subtypes): list = new ArrayList<D2>();

and so on. Seven different cases:

    1) C2 D1 D2 E1 E2 E3 E4    ||C2 or subtypes
    2)    D1    E1 E2          ||D1 or subtypes
    3)       D2       E3 E4    ||D2 or subtypes
    4)          E1             ||E1 or subtypes
    5)             E2          ||E2 or subtypes
    6)                E3       ||E3 or subtypes
    7)                   E4    ||E4 or subtypes

Or graphically

enter image description here

where each red area represents a set of valid types for every possible ArrayList.

As you can easily see, there is not a safe type that is common to every case:

  • you cannot list.add(new C2(){}); because it could be list = new ArrayList<D1>();
  • you cannot list.add(new D1(){}); because it could be list = new ArrayList<D2>();

and so on.

2. Super

By writing

    List<? super C2> list;

you are saying that list will be able to reference an object of type (for example) ArrayList that contains one and only one of the 7 supertypes of C2 (C2 included):

  • A1 (or subtypes): list = new ArrayList<A1>();, or
  • A2 (or subtypes): list = new ArrayList<A2>();, or
  • A3 (or subtypes): list = new ArrayList<A3>();

and so on. Seven different cases here too:

    1) A1          B1 B2       C1 C2    D1 D2 E1 E2 E3 E4    ||A1 or subtypes
    2)    A2          B2       C1 C2    D1 D2 E1 E2 E3 E4    ||A2 or subtypes
    3)       A3          B3       C2 C3 D1 D2 E1 E2 E3 E4    ||A3 or subtypes
    4)          A4       B3 B4    C2 C3 D1 D2 E1 E2 E3 E4    ||A4 or subtypes  
    5)                B2       C1 C2    D1 D2 E1 E2 E3 E4    ||B2 or subtypes
    6)                   B3       C2 C3 D1 D2 E1 E2 E3 E4    ||B3 or subtypes
    7)                            C2    D1 D2 E1 E2 E3 E4    ||C2 or subtypes

Or graphically

enter image description here

As you can see, here we have seven safe types that are common to every case: C2, D1, D2, E1, E2, E3, E4.

  • you can list.add(new C2(){}); because, regardless of the kind of List we're referencing, C2 is allowed
  • you can list.add(new D1(){}); because, regardless of the kind of List we're referencing, D1 is allowed

and so on. You probably noticed that these types correspond to the hierarchy starting from type C2.

Notes

Here the complete hierarchy if you wish to make some tests

interface A1{}
interface A2{}
interface A3{}
interface A4{}

interface B1 extends A1{}
interface B2 extends A1,A2{}
interface B3 extends A3,A4{}
interface B4 extends A4{}

interface C1 extends B2{}
interface C2 extends B2,B3{}
interface C3 extends B3{}

interface D1 extends C1,C2{}
interface D2 extends C2{}

interface E1 extends D1{}
interface E2 extends D1{}
interface E3 extends D2{}
interface E4 extends D2{}
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Good explanation. Still confused on second picture color code. – ravindra Oct 21 '15 at 10:52
    
Thank you! I struggled a whole day to just clear my mind about these concepts, I thought it was worth sharing my notes for future readers – Luigi Cortese Oct 21 '15 at 10:54
    
@ravindra better now? (added some note in the pictures) – Luigi Cortese Oct 21 '15 at 11:08
    
Yes. It's better now. One of excellent posts. – ravindra Oct 21 '15 at 11:17

super is a lower bound, and extends is an upper bound.

According to http://download.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/extra/generics/morefun.html :

The solution is to use a form of bounded wildcard we haven't seen yet: wildcards with a lower bound. The syntax ? super T denotes an unknown type that is a supertype of T (or T itself; remember that the supertype relation is reflexive). It is the dual of the bounded wildcards we've been using, where we use ? extends T to denote an unknown type that is a subtype of T.

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Using extends you can only get from the collection. You cannot put into it. Also, though super allows to both get and put, the return type during get is ? super T. A detailed explanation is given in my blog http://preciselyconcise.com/java/generics/c_wildcards.php

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The generic wildcards target two primary needs:

Reading from a generic collection Inserting into a generic collection There are three ways to define a collection (variable) using generic wildcards. These are:

List<?>           listUknown = new ArrayList<A>();
List<? extends A> listUknown = new ArrayList<A>();
List<? super   A> listUknown = new ArrayList<A>();

List<?> means a list typed to an unknown type. This could be a List<A>, a List<B>, a List<String> etc.

List<? extends A> means a List of objects that are instances of the class A, or subclasses of A (e.g. B and C). List<? super A> means that the list is typed to either the A class, or a superclass of A.

Read more : http://tutorials.jenkov.com/java-generics/wildcards.html

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I love the answer from @Bert F but this is the way my brain sees it.

I have an X in my hand. If I want to write my X into a List, that List needs to be either a List of X or a List of things that my X can be upcast to as I write them in i.e. any superclass of X...

List<? super   X>

If I get a List and I want to read an X out of that List, that better be a List of X or a List of things that can be upcast to X as I read them out, i.e. anything that extends X

List<? extends X>

Hope this helps.

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