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What is the difference between List<? super T> and List<? extends T> ?

I used to use List<? extends T> but it does not allow me to add elements to it (list.add(e)). whereas the List<? super T> allows.

I want to know the difference.

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what is the type of e , full code would be helpful –  Jigar Joshi Dec 3 '10 at 7:04
    
e is a subclass of T –  Anand Dec 3 '10 at 8:19
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3 Answers

up vote 60 down vote accepted

extends

The wildcard declaration of List<? extends Number> foo3 means that any of these are legal assignments:

List<? extends Number> foo3 = new ArrayList<Number>;  // Number "extends" Number (in this context)
List<? extends Number> foo3 = new ArrayList<Integer>; // Integer extends Number
List<? extends Number> foo3 = new ArrayList<Double>;  // Double extends Number

Reading - Given the above possible assignments, what type of object are you guarenteed to read from List foo3:

  • You can read a Number because any of the lists that could be assigned to foo3 contain a Number or a subclass of Number.
  • You can't read an Integer because foo3 could be pointing at a List<Double>.
  • You can't read a Double because foo3 could be pointing at a List<Integer>.

Writing - Given the above possible assignments, what type of object could you add to List foo3 that would be legal for all the above possible ArrayList assignments:

  • You can't add an Integer because foo3 could be pointing at a List<Double>.
  • You can't add a Double because foo3 could be pointing at a List<Integer>.
  • You can't add a Number because foo3 could be pointing at a List<Integer>.

You can't add any object to List<? extends T> because you can't guarantee what kind of List it is really pointing to, so you can't guarantee that the object is allowed in that List. The only "guarantee" is that you can only read from it and you'll get a T or subclass of T.

super

Now consider List < ? super T >.

The wildcard declaration of List<? super Integer> foo3 means that any of these are legal assignments:

List<? super Integer> foo3 = new ArrayList<Integer>;  // Integer is a "superclass" of Integer (in this context)
List<? super Integer> foo3 = new ArrayList<Number>;   // Number is a superclass of Integer
List<? super Integer> foo3 = new ArrayList<Object>;   // Object is a superclass of Integer

Reading - Given the above possible assignments, what type of object are you guaranteed to receive when you read from List foo3:

  • You aren't guaranteed an Integer because foo3 could be pointing at a List<Number> or List<Object>.
  • You aren't guaranteed an Number because foo3 could be pointing at a List<Object>.
  • The only guarantee is that you will get an instance of an Object or subclass of Object (but you don't know what subclass).

Writing - Given the above possible assignments, what type of object could you add to List foo3 that would be legal for all the above possible ArrayList assignments:

  • You can add an Integer because an Integer is allowed in any of above lists.
  • You can add an instance of a subclass of Integer because an instance of a subclass of Integer is allowed in any of the above lists.
  • You can't add a Double because foo3 could be pointing at a ArrayList<Integer>.
  • You can't add a Number because foo3 could be pointing at a ArrayList<Integer>.
  • You can't add a Object because foo3 could be pointing at a ArrayList<Integer>.

PECS

Remember PECS: "Producer Extends, Consumer Super".

  • "Producer Extends" - If you need a List to produce T values (you want to read Ts from the list), you need to declare it with ? extends T, e.g. List<? extends Integer>. But you cannot add to this list.

  • "Consumer Super" - If you need a List to consume T values (you want to write Ts into the list), you need to declare it with ? super T, e.g. List<? super Integer>. But there are no guarantees what type of object you may read from this list.

  • If you need to both read from and write to a list, you need to declare it exactly with no wildcards, e.g. List<Integer>.

Example

Note this example from the Java Generics FAQ. Note how the source list src (the producing list) uses extends and the destination list dest (the consuming list) uses super:

public class Collections { 
  public static <T> void copy  
  ( List<? super T> dest, List<? extends T> src) {
      for (int i=0; i<src.size(); i++) 
        dest.set(i,src.get(i)); 
  } 
}

Also see How can I add to List<? extends Number> data structures?

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I have a doubt here: If I need to add to a generic list and then get data from it, what should i do? –  Anand Dec 3 '10 at 8:40
    
@Anand - See the 3rd bullet under PECS above. You'll probably need to use a specific generic parameters (no wildcard, e.g. List<T>). Unfortunately, you can't have everything. You can either create a flexible reference to list by using a generic wildcard (e.g. <? super T> or <? extends T> and suffer limitations with respect to what you can add or read from it. Or else you can a less flexible reference to a list with a specific type (e.g. List<T>) and get better guarantees as to what you can read /write from it. –  Bert F Dec 3 '10 at 14:02
    
as an example you can see Collections copy method public static <T> void copy(List<? super T> dest, List<? extends T> src) { @ docjar.com/html/api/java/util/Collections.java.html –  AZ_ Feb 18 '13 at 15:06
2  
@BertF: great explanation.one correction (if it ) do you mean to say`List<? super Integer> foo3` instead of List<? super Number> foo3 below super ? –  brain storm Feb 12 at 23:00
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super is a lower bound, and extends is an upper bound.

According to http://download.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/extra/generics/morefun.html :

The solution is to use a form of bounded wildcard we haven't seen yet: wildcards with a lower bound. The syntax ? super T denotes an unknown type that is a supertype of T (or T itself; remember that the supertype relation is reflexive). It is the dual of the bounded wildcards we've been using, where we use ? extends T to denote an unknown type that is a subtype of T.

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Using extends you can only get from the collection. You cannot put into it. Also, though super allows to both get and put, the return type during get is ? super T. A detailed explanation is given in my blog http://preciselyconcise.com/java/generics/c_wildcards.php

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