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I am looking for a way to code a program which will multiply an integer to an exponent using only a recursion loop. I have a very limited understanding of recursion, but have been able to code something to give a factorial:

int fac2(int n)
{
    if (n == 1){
        return 1;
    } else {
        return n*fac2(n-1);
    }
}

I have a way to find a power already, but it uses a for loop:

int my_power(int x, int e)
{
    int i, total;
    total = 1;
    for (i = 1; i <= e; i++){
    total *= x;
    }
    return total;
}

How can I replace this for loop using recursion?

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7 Answers 7

int my_power (int x, int e) {
  if (e == 0) return 1;

  return x * my_power(x, e-1);
}
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Remember that a recursive function calls itself until some base case is achieved. What is your base case here? Raising a number to a power is liking saying that you are going to multiply some number x amount of times. The hint is to call the recursive function, reducing the power by one until you reach your desired base case.

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3  
p.s. I didn't add any code as it seemed like you are trying to figure this out on your own. –  darren Dec 3 '10 at 7:05
1  
That I was, though I kind of figured someone was going to spoil it for me anyway. Luckily, I am still capable of ignoring the ones that give away the answer outright. –  not_l33t Dec 3 '10 at 7:10

Use Dave Anderson's as a basis, but also consider the special cases of where:

1) x is 0 
2) e is negative.

Again, no code so you can try to figure it out yourself :-)

Update: Make sure you create a number of test cases, and you make sure everyone works as you think it should. Once the tests pass, you'll know that your recursive power function is working correctly.

Example: Having had time to figure it out yourself, I though I'd present a solution, with tests:

int main(void)
{
    // n = 0 special case
    test(0, 0, 1);
    test(4, 0, 1);
    test(-5, 0, 1);

    // x = 0 special case
    test(0, 0, 1);
    test(0, 2, 0);

    // normal use
    test(4, 1, 4);
    test(4, -1, 0.25);
    test(-4, 3, -64);
    test(8, 2, 64);
    test(2, 3, 8);
    test(2, -3, 0.125);
    test(2, -5, 0.03125);

    // Invalid input tests
    std::cout << std::endl << "Invalid input tests" << std::endl;
    test (0, -2, NULL);
    test(0, -4, NULL);


    // Negative Tests
    std::cout << std::endl << "Negative tests (expect failure)" << std::endl;
    test(4, 0, 4);
    test(2, 1, 1);
    test(2, -5, 0.0313);

    return 0;
}

double power(int x, int n)
{
    // check for invalid input
    if (n == 0)
    {
        return 1;
    }

    if (n > 0)
    {
        return x * power(x, n - 1);
    }
    else if (n < 0)
    {
        return 1 / (x * power(x, -n - 1));
    }
}

bool test(int x, int n, double expected)
{
    if (x == 0 && n < 0)
    {
        std::cout << "Testing " << x << "^" << n << ", result = 'Invalid input'." <<  std::endl;
        return false;
    }

    double result = power(x, n);
    std::cout << "Testing " << x << "^" << n << ", result = " << result << ". Expected " << expected << " - test " << ((result == expected) ? "PASSED" : "FAILED") <<  std::endl;
    return true;
}

Output:

Testing 0^0, result = 1. Expected 1 - test PASSED
Testing 4^0, result = 1. Expected 1 - test PASSED
Testing -5^0, result = 1. Expected 1 - test PASSED
Testing 0^0, result = 1. Expected 1 - test PASSED
Testing 0^2, result = 0. Expected 0 - test PASSED
Testing 4^1, result = 4. Expected 4 - test PASSED
Testing 4^-1, result = 0.25. Expected 0.25 - test PASSED
Testing -4^3, result = -64. Expected -64 - test PASSED
Testing 8^2, result = 64. Expected 64 - test PASSED
Testing 2^3, result = 8. Expected 8 - test PASSED
Testing 2^-3, result = 0.125. Expected 0.125 - test PASSED
Testing 2^-5, result = 0.03125. Expected 0.03125 - test PASSED

Invalid input tests
Testing 0^-2, result = 'Invalid input'.
Testing 0^-4, result = 'Invalid input'.

Negative tests (expect failure)
Testing 4^0, result = 1. Expected 4 - test FAILED
Testing 2^1, result = 2. Expected 1 - test FAILED
Testing 2^-5, result = 0.03125. Expected 0.0313 - test FAILED
share|improve this answer
    
the first case you give should be accounted for, simply by the fact that anything you give it will just be multiplied by 0. however, the negative one is a bit trickier, and was the biggest problem I thought would come up. perhaps using an if(x>0) {dave anderson code}; if(x<0) {similar, but divide instead of multiply, and add towards 0}. Think I'm on the right track? –  not_l33t Dec 3 '10 at 7:22
    
1) Could be made more efficient as a special case, and avoid any recursion. 2) For each recursion, e needs to move towards 1. 3) Dave's example will always return 1 for positive powers, how might you stop that? –  cspolton Dec 3 '10 at 7:31
1  
You are almost correct but it's the if (e > 0) {...}; if (e < 0) {...} i.e. e rather than x. –  cspolton Dec 3 '10 at 7:35
    
Looking forward to seeing what you come up with, you're on the right track for sure. –  cspolton Dec 3 '10 at 7:41
    
right- i promise i had it typed right in my actual code. I did find one much easier way of doing it than i had suggested above: if -e, return 1/(my_power(x, -e-1)); –  not_l33t Dec 3 '10 at 7:45

The right way of doing what you want is by noticing that:

  • xn = (xn/2)2, if n is even
  • xn = x * (x⊦n/2⫞)2, if n is odd
  • x1 = x
  • x0 = 1

where "⊦n/2⫞" means the integer part of n/2 (which is what n/2 gives you in C when n is an integer variable).

Contrasting with the factorial, which reads

  • n! = n * (n - 1)!, if n > 0
  • 0! = 1

you should be able to write a recursive program for exponentiation basing yourself on the factorial.

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Why are people downvoting this? This is the right way of powering. –  Axn Dec 3 '10 at 18:50
    
yeah they downvote, they mess with my formatting, where is the police ? ^^ –  Alexandre C. Dec 4 '10 at 10:26

There's a way of thinking about this that requires us stepping outside of C-land, but it's so simple at it's heart and powerful it's well worth considering.

Recursion and iteration aren't so different as they first seem. At a certain level, it's actually hard to tell them apart. We won't quite go there, but consider this recursive implementation of a for "loop" (in no particular language):

for (i, n, f, a) = 
  if (i > n) {
    return a
  } else {
    return for (i+1, n, f, f(a, i))
  }

(The a, by the way, is called an "accumulator", because it accumulates the value of each "loop")

The one thing that might be new to you is that the above treats functions like any other data type, which is something called "first-class functions". This isn't typically something you do in C (you can do it in a limited fashion by passing function pointers), but it's so powerful a concept that it's well worth learning.

Using the above definition of for, we write your factorial function as:

mult(a,b) = a*b
fac(n) = for (1, n, mult, 1)

This putts along, multiplying each i by the accumulator.

Another powerful concept (that, sadly, C doesn't support at all) is anonymous functions, which are simply functions created without names. I'm going to use the syntax e -> ... for anonymous functions, where ... is some expression (e.g. x -> x+1), and (a,b) for a pair of variables. In C, anonymous functions might seem useless, but if you can pass around functions as easily as you can pass around numbers, you can simplify fac to a single line:

fac(n) = for (1, n, (a,i) -> a*i, 1)

pow can be written as:

pow(x, e) = for(1, e, (a,i) -> a*x, 1) 

Expand for in that, and you've got a recursive definition for pow.

Though this gives you a recursive function, there is another implementation (Alexandre's, in fact) that's more time efficient.

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

This function will, to the best of my knowledge, for any likely case (someone setting "asdfj" as x or e is not likely) work.

#include <stdio.h>

double my_power(int x, int e)
{
    if (x == 0)
    {
        return 0;
    }
    if (e == 0)
    {
        return 1;
    }
    if (e > 0)
    {
        return x * my_power(x, e-1);
    }
    if (e < 0)
    {
        return 1/(x*my_power(x, -e-1));
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
If e starts as -3, on the next recursion it will be (-3-1) = 2, but it should be -2, and then -1. Also you need to divide the result of my_power by x. –  cspolton Dec 3 '10 at 8:08
1  
if e becomes positive, when it goes back through the function it will go to the positive e case. Say we have my_power(2,-3). What the function will do is this: 1/(2*my_power(2,2). my_power(2,2) will return 4, so what the original gives is 1/(2*4), or 1/8 –  not_l33t Dec 3 '10 at 19:08
    
Your implementation for negative e does indeed work, nice –  cspolton Dec 4 '10 at 11:26
    
The e == 0 special case take precedence over the x == 0 case, so they need to be switched around. –  cspolton Dec 4 '10 at 11:29

Here's a pseudo-code for you:

FUNCTION mypower(number, exponent)
    IF exponent == 0 THEN:
        RETURN 1
    ELSE IF exponent > 0 THEN:
        RETURN number * mypower(number, exponent - 1)
    ELSE:
        RETURN 1 / mypower(number, -(exponent))

And oh, the return value should be double.

Here's the actual code:

double mypower(int n, int e) {
    if (e == 0)
        return 1;
    else if (e > 0)
        return n * mypower(n, e - 1);
    else
        return 1 / mypower(n, -e);
}
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Both the pseudocode and actual code have issues with the last line. The correct (and simplified) version would be return 1/mypower(n, -e) –  Axn Dec 3 '10 at 18:56
    
You're right, thanks for the correction. –  Ruel Dec 4 '10 at 0:06

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