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Here is the procedure,

CREATE OR REPLACE PROCEDURE provsnXmlCmprsn (
            encyNo SAS_PRO_CTL.AGENCYNO%TYPE, period SAS_PRO_CTL.PERIODE%TYPE) IS

xmlContent SAS_PRO_XML.XMLCONTENT%TYPE;
sasProvisionId SAS_PRO_CTL.SASPROVISIONID%TYPE;

CURSOR crsrXml IS
SELECT XMLCONTENT, c.SASPROVISIONID FROM SAS_PRO_XML x, SAS_PRO_CTL c
  WHERE x.SASPROVISIONID = c.SASPROVISIONID AND c.PERIODE = period 
                                    AND c.AGENCYNO = agencyNo ORDER BY XMLLINENO;

BEGIN
DBMS_OUTPUT.put_line('Params: ' || agencyNo || ', ' || period);

OPEN crsrXml;
LOOP
  FETCH crsrXml INTO xmlContent, sasProvisionId;
  EXIT WHEN crsrXml%NOTFOUND;
    DBMS_OUTPUT.put_line('XML Content Length: ' || LENGTH(xmlContent));
END LOOP;
CLOSE crsrXml;

END provsnXmlCmprsn;

The query in the cursor is retrieving 5 rows, whereas 1 row is expected, according to the condition and argument values. The same query results in 1 row, when run independently. And the surprising part is, the query in the cursor always return 5 rows no matter if the condition, c.PERIODE = period AND c.AGENCYNO = agencyNo, passed or not. Which clearly means that this query,

SELECT XMLCONTENT, c.SASPROVISIONID FROM SAS_PRO_XML x, SAS_PRO_CTL c
  WHERE x.SASPROVISIONID = c.SASPROVISIONID AND c.PERIODE = period 
                                    AND c.AGENCYNO = agencyNo ORDER BY XMLLINENO;

and this query,

SELECT XMLCONTENT, c.SASPROVISIONID FROM SAS_PRO_XML x, SAS_PRO_CTL c
  WHERE x.SASPROVISIONID = c.SASPROVISIONID ORDER BY XMLLINENO;

are behaving same inside the cursor. This, AND c.PERIODE = period AND c.AGENCYNO = agencyNo, part is not at all considered. Any idea what's going wrong?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

One of your parameters has the same name as the column: AGENCYNO. Because of the way scoping works this evaluates to 1=1. This is why it is good practice to give parameters unique names, for example by prepending them with p_.

You should find that

AND c.PERIODE = p_period AND c.AGENCYNO = p_agencyNo

returns the desired one row. Strictly speaking you don't need to change the name of period to p_period because it is already distinguished from periode. But consistency is a virtue in software engineering.

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APC beat me to it. He's apparently far more caffeinated than I at the moment. –  Justin Cave Dec 3 '10 at 8:02
2  
@JustinCave - actually the first tea of the day is cooling unsipped on the table ;) –  APC Dec 3 '10 at 8:03
    
Brilliant, thanks. It took me half a day, would you believe it? I was still half into Java and thinking change in case will do it, while writing this PL/SQL procedure. :) –  Adeel Ansari Dec 3 '10 at 8:09

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