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Integer[] lastExchange = new Integer[nColors];
Integer[] exchangeToAdd = new Integer[nColors];
lastExchange = getValue();
exchangeToAdd = getValue(); 
exchanges.add(exchangeToAdd);

Integer[] newExchange = new Integer[nColors];
while (true) {
   newExchange = getValue(lastExchange);
   Integer[] exchangeToAddForLoop = new Integer[nColors];
   for (int i=0; i<nColors; i++) {
      lastExchange[i] = newExchange[i];
      exchangeToAddForLoop[i] = newExchange[i];
  }
  exchanges.add(exchangeToAddForLoop);
}

ADDED

What I am trying to do with this code? I need to populate (fill in) the list called exchanges. The first element of the list is lastExchange. My problem with the code is that I always need to create two duplicates of an variable (it is why I think that the code is not elegant but I cannot find a better solution). For example, in the very beginning I create lastExchange and then I create exchangeToAdd (that has the same value as lastExchange). The same happens in the loop. I create lastExchange and then I create exchangeToAddForLoop. I do so because I cannot add lastExchange to the list because it will be modified latter.

ADDED 2

Here is my problem. I have the code like that:

Integer[] e  = getValue();
Integer[] e1 = getValue();  // <-- I do not like that.
exchanges.add(e1);          // <-- I do not like that.
while (true) {
   Integer[] e_new = getValue(e);
   Integer[] e2 = new Integer[nColors]; // <-- I do not like that.
   for (int i=0; i<nColors; i++) {
      e[i] = e_new[i];
      e2[i] = e_new[i]; // <-- I do not like that.
  }
  exchanges.add(e2); // <-- I do not like that.
}

and I need to calculate e1 and e2 additionally to the calculation of e.

share|improve this question
    
What are you trying to do? – javamonkey79 Dec 3 '10 at 11:05
2  
Elegant? I don't think so. You are needlessly creating objects that you never use, and your loop never ends. What is the 'duplicate local variable problem'? – sje397 Dec 3 '10 at 11:07
    
Probably related: stackoverflow.com/questions/4344051/… – Cephalopod Dec 3 '10 at 11:14
    
@sje397, where do I create objects that I never use? – Roman Dec 3 '10 at 12:19
    
@Roman - look at the 1st and 3rd lines - you create an array, then overwrite it immediately with the return value of getValue. You can see what you've done wrong by looking at e.g. Jon Skeet's code below. – sje397 Dec 3 '10 at 12:25
up vote 4 down vote accepted

This is inelegant code in at least two ways:

  • Most of your local variables are being assigned values which are then immediately overwritten
  • Your newExchange variable could be declared more deeply nested.

So without changing any behaviour, here's a nicer version:

Integer[] lastExchange = getValue();
Integer[] exchangeToAdd = getValue();
exchanges.add(exchangeToAdd);

while (true) {
   Integer[] newExchange = getValue(lastExchange);
   Integer[] exchangeToAddForLoop = new Integer[nColors];
   for (int i=0; i<nColors; i++) {
      lastExchange[i] = newExchange[i];
      exchangeToAddForLoop[i] = newExchange[i];
   }
   exchanges.add(exchangeToAddForLoop);
}

Next we come to the problem that you haven't told us what any of this code is meant to be doing, nor what you mean by "the duplicate local variable problem". Oh, and as pointed out in the comments, your loop never terminates.

share|improve this answer
    
So, the main objection against the code is that I do not assign the values to the variable when I create them (variables)? Why it is better to declare newExchange more deeply nested? In this case I create and assign on every cycle while in my example I just assign in every cycle. My main problem with the code is that I always need to create a duplicate of the lastExchange (before the loop it is exchangeToAdd in the loop it is exchangeToAddForLoop). It is why I think that code is not elegant. But may be there is no way to make it more elegant. – Roman Dec 3 '10 at 12:26
    
@Roman: Code is generally clearer when you limit the scope of variables as much as possible - it makes it obvious that you're not using it outside the loop. Without knowing what your code is really trying to do, it's very hard to know how to improve it. – Jon Skeet Dec 3 '10 at 12:33
    
@Jon Skeet, OK thank you. I understand the problems that you mentioned (I need to assign values to the variables when I declare them and I need to move declaration of newExchange to the loop). But my main question was if it is OK that I duplicate the lastExchnage? I have extended my original question to clarify what my code is trying to do. – Roman Dec 3 '10 at 12:37
    
@Roman: We don't know what getValue() does - is there any reason you can't call exchanges.add(getValue(e)) for example? Does it create a new array itself, or not? – Jon Skeet Dec 3 '10 at 12:55
1  
@Roman: If you're already creating a new array, why are you bothering to copy it? – Jon Skeet Dec 3 '10 at 13:14

Without discussing your code, when you have duplicate variable errors, you can always use {}.

This does not compile

            int a=0;
            a++;


            int a=0;
            a++;

this does:

        {
            int a=0;
            a++;
        }
        {
            int a=0;
            a++;
        }
share|improve this answer

@Jon's simplification is the safest, however I suspect it can be simplified further.

exchanges.add(getValue());

while (true) { // forever??
   // do you need null values or can you use int[]
   int[] newExchange = getValue(exchanges.get(exchanges.size()-1);
   // do you need to add a copy, if not then clone() can be dropped.
   exchanges.add(newExchange.clone());
}
share|improve this answer

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