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Consider this example which prints out some device type stats. ("DeviceType" is an enum with a dozenish values.)

Multiset<DeviceType> histogram = getDeviceStats();
for (DeviceType type : histogram.elementSet()) {
    System.out.println(type + ": " + histogram.count(type));
}

What's the simplest, most elegant way to print the distinct elements in the order of their frequency (most common type first)?

With a quick look at the Multiset interface, there's no ready-made method for this, and none of Guava's Multiset implementations (HashMultiset, TreeMultiset, etc) seem to automatically keep elements frequency-ordered either.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 27 down vote accepted

I just added this feature to Guava, see here for the Javadoc.

Edit: usage example of Multisets.copyHighestCountFirst() as per the original question:

Multiset<DeviceType> histogram = getDeviceStats();
for (DeviceType type : Multisets.copyHighestCountFirst(histogram).elementSet()) {
    System.out.println(type + ": " + histogram.count(type));
}
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Wow, thanks! So this will be included in Guava release 11 apparently? –  Jonik Oct 9 '11 at 19:15
1  
Yep. (I was the Guava intern this summer.) It might get renamed, though; see code.google.com/p/guava-libraries/issues/detail?id=356. –  Louis Wasserman Oct 17 '11 at 6:23
    
I took the liberty to add a code example. Also marking this as accepted now. Thanks again for implementing the feature! –  Jonik May 21 '12 at 19:20
    
awesome. even though you stole my checkmark :-) –  Sean Patrick Floyd May 22 '12 at 8:00
3  
Well, pretty nice, but it would be better with ability to choose ascending/descending order of sorting. –  akapelko Sep 22 '12 at 11:49

Here's a method that returns a List of entries, sorted by frequency (UPDATE: used a flag to toggle ascending / descending order and used Guava's favorite toy: the Enum Singleton Pattern, as found in Effective Java, Item 3 ):

private enum EntryComp implements Comparator<Multiset.Entry<?>>{
    DESCENDING{
        @Override
        public int compare(final Entry<?> a, final Entry<?> b){
            return Ints.compare(b.getCount(), a.getCount());
        }
    },
    ASCENDING{
        @Override
        public int compare(final Entry<?> a, final Entry<?> b){
            return Ints.compare(a.getCount(), b.getCount());
        }
    },
}

public static <E> List<Entry<E>> getEntriesSortedByFrequency(
    final Multiset<E> ms, final boolean ascending){
    final List<Entry<E>> entryList = Lists.newArrayList(ms.entrySet());
    Collections.sort(entryList, ascending
        ? EntryComp.ASCENDING
        : EntryComp.DESCENDING);
    return entryList;
}

Test code:

final Multiset<String> ms =
    HashMultiset.create(Arrays.asList(
        "One",
        "Two", "Two",
        "Three", "Three", "Three",
        "Four", "Four", "Four", "Four"
    ));

System.out.println("ascending:");
for(final Entry<String> entry : getEntriesSortedByFrequency(ms, true)){
    System.out.println(MessageFormat.format("{0} ({1})",
        entry.getElement(), entry.getCount()));
}

System.out.println("descending:");
for(final Entry<String> entry : getEntriesSortedByFrequency(ms, false)){
    System.out.println(MessageFormat.format("{0} ({1})",
        entry.getElement(), entry.getCount()));
}

Output:

ascending:
One (1)
Two (2)
Three (3)
Four (4)
descending:
Four (4)
Three (3)
Two (2)
One (1)

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This is pretty nice, quite possibly the simplest way for now while Multiset itself doesn't provide it! –  Jonik Dec 4 '10 at 11:21
2  
(Guava is so cool; I hadn't noticed e.g. the Ints class before. Looking at the API docs some more, Files was also new to me — a util collection similar to what Commons IO has, except with generics support & somehow cleaner overall.) –  Jonik Dec 4 '10 at 11:23

Since it is not yet implemented, I guess you can create a Map with key=type and value=count. Then sort that map - see here

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An Implementation using ForwardingMultiSet :

(EntryComp from seanizer's answer)

enum EntryComp implements Comparator<Multiset.Entry<?>> {
    DESCENDING {
        @Override
        public int compare(final Entry<?> a, final Entry<?> b) {
            return Ints.compare(b.getCount(), a.getCount());
        }
    },
    ASCENDING {
        @Override
        public int compare(final Entry<?> a, final Entry<?> b) {
            return Ints.compare(a.getCount(), b.getCount());
        }
    },
}

public class FreqSortMultiSet<E> extends ForwardingMultiset<E> {
    Multiset<E> delegate;
    EntryComp comp;

    public FreqSortMultiSet(Multiset<E> delegate, boolean ascending) {
        this.delegate = delegate;
        if (ascending)
            this.comp = EntryComp.ASCENDING;
        else
            this.comp = EntryComp.DESCENDING;
    }

    @Override
    protected Multiset<E> delegate() {
        return delegate;
    }

    @Override
    public Set<Entry<E>> entrySet() {
        TreeSet<Entry<E>> sortedEntrySet = new TreeSet<Entry<E>>(comp);
        sortedEntrySet.addAll(delegate.entrySet());
        return sortedEntrySet;
    }

    @Override
    public Set<E> elementSet() {
        Set<E> sortedEntrySet = new LinkedHashSet<E>();
        for (Entry<E> en : entrySet())
            sortedEntrySet.add(en.getElement());
        return sortedEntrySet;
    }

    public static <E> FreqSortMultiSet<E> create(boolean ascending) {
        return new FreqSortMultiSet<E>(HashMultiset.<E> create(), ascending);
    }

    /*
     * For Testing
     * public static void main(String[] args) {
        Multiset<String> s = FreqSortMultiSet.create(false);
        s.add("Hello");
        s.add("Hello");
        s.setCount("World", 3);
        s.setCount("Bye", 5);
        System.out.println(s.entrySet());
    }*/

}
share|improve this answer
    
+1. Elegant, in a way, to have a Multiset implementation which includes and abstracts away all the sorting logic. Client code using this would remain simple (no changes needed to example code in my question as long as FreqSortMultiSet was used). Drawback, of course, is having to write & maintain somewhat more code overall than in S.P.Floyd's solution... –  Jonik Dec 7 '10 at 19:01

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