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Consider a table like this:

   folders_table
   -----------------------
      INT id_folder
      INT id_folder_parent
      VARCHAR folder_name

Which stores a simple directory structure. How could I get all subdirectories of a directory with a single SELECT query?

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Curious to know why would you want to do this at db level and not at the application layer? –  papdel Dec 3 '10 at 13:26
5  
Because one query is much faster than the many queries it would take to build the tree at application level. –  El Yobo Dec 3 '10 at 13:50
    
What is the exact result you're looking for from the query? Do you want the subdirectories of a single, given directory? Do you want a list of every directory paired with all its subdirectories? Do you want to construct the tree structure with the query? Something else? –  outis Dec 3 '10 at 23:47
    
@outis I was looking to just get all subdirectories of a single directory. But I have done it in application logic with recursion for now (I am just quering db server in a recursive function in PHP). It's a little slow but it will have to work for now. –  Richard Knop Dec 4 '10 at 1:17
    
I see, now. In other words, you want all descendent directories. "Subdirectories" is ambiguous, as it could be taken to mean all child directories or all descendent directories. –  outis Dec 5 '10 at 1:14

3 Answers 3

up vote 17 down vote accepted

It is possible, but you need to change your database structure; once the changes are made, you can retrieve a tree of any depth in one query. The queries are slightly more complex, but it's still pretty straightforward.

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The sitepoint link is broken. Do you know where to find another copy of that? –  Cam Aug 23 '11 at 19:02
    
Seems to be back again now. –  El Yobo Aug 23 '11 at 23:03
    
Sorry, I meant the MySQL article. Do you know where to find a copy of that? –  Cam Aug 24 '11 at 0:44
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No, I don't sorry, but the information was almost exactly the same. At the time that I read them, I found the Sitepoint article to be the clearer of the two, so even if the MySQL one was available I'd recommend using the Sitepoint one. –  El Yobo Aug 24 '11 at 0:51
1  
The name of the described concepts are "Adjacency List Model" and "Nested Set Model" (with "modified preorder tree traversal algorithm"). You can find a lot of information in the net, regarding this topic in <you prefered language>. –  jens Jan 8 '13 at 21:23

With the table structure you have shown, this cannot be done with MySQL as it does not support recursive queries

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See comment below; it's not possible with this data structure, but it is possible by avoiding recursion and changing the data structure a little. –  El Yobo Dec 3 '10 at 13:32
1  
That's what I said ;) Recursive queries are not possible with MySQL (unlike with other DBMS) –  a_horse_with_no_name Dec 3 '10 at 13:35
    
But this can be done with mysql; the OP never said that it had to be done with recursive queries. The approach I point out does it in one query. –  El Yobo Dec 3 '10 at 13:51
    
I assumed the OP wants to keep the table structure that is already defined. I edited my answer to include this assumption –  a_horse_with_no_name Dec 3 '10 at 13:57

With MySql/MariaDB you can use the Open Query Graph engine (http://openquery.com/graph/doc) which is a mysql plugin that lets you create a special table where you put the relationships, basically parentId and childId.

The magic is that you query this table with a special column latch depending of the value passed in the query will tell the OQGRAPH engine which command to execute. See the docs for details.

It handle not only tree (recursive 1-n relations), but graph data structures (recursive n-m relations) with weight (think for example that you want to store companies ownership, a company can have several subsidiaries and can also have several shareholders).

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