Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I need to do something like this:

<script type="text/javascript">
    token_url = "http://example.com/your_token_url";
</script>

I'm using the Beta version of MVC, but I can't figure out how to get the absolute url of an action. I'd like to do something like this:

<%= Url.AbsoluteAction("Action","Controller")) %>

Is there a helper or Page method for this?

share|improve this question
    
This should help you. [stackoverflow.com/questions/434604/… [1]: stackoverflow.com/questions/434604/… –  Diego Dias Apr 24 '12 at 15:23

7 Answers 7

up vote 256 down vote accepted

Click here for more information, but esentially there is no need for extension methods. It's already baked in, just not in a very intuitive way.

Url.Action("Action", null, null, Request.Url.Scheme);
share|improve this answer
2  
Interesting, so if you specify the protocol, the URL is absolute –  Casebash Aug 2 '10 at 22:49
15  
I think this is the right answer. –  rudimenter Oct 13 '10 at 8:51
1  
Yeah this should be marked as the right answer. –  jonathanconway Jun 27 '11 at 8:18
15  
This answer is the better one, this way Resharper can still validate that the Action and Controller exists. I would suggest the use of Request.Url.Scheme instead of the http, that way http and https are both supported. –  Pbirkoff Mar 16 '12 at 10:25
2  
@Pbirkoff, agree that this is the best answer but you might like to know that you can annotate your own methods for ReSharper to know that parameters represent actions/controllers. In that way R# can still validate the strings you provide, as it does so well. –  Drew Noakes Aug 8 '12 at 22:34

Better yet, extend the UrlHelper - doh!

namespace System.Web.Mvc
{
    public static class HtmlExtensions
    {
        public static string AbsoluteAction(this UrlHelper url, string action, string controller)
        {
            Uri requestUrl = url.RequestContext.HttpContext.Request.Url;

            string absoluteAction = string.Format("{0}://{1}{2}",
                                                  requestUrl.Scheme,
                                                  requestUrl.Authority,
                                                  url.Action(action, controller));

            return absoluteAction;
        }
    }
}

Then call it like this

<%= Url.AbsoluteAction("Dashboard", "Account")%>

:-)

share|improve this answer
2  
I would add also optional parameters for this solution. This should cover all cases. –  Jenea May 27 '09 at 14:54
    
Very nice! I used this code but I made the only argument relativeUrl so that the caller can create it using whatever Url method they like (router values etc), and your method can just be responsible for making it relative. So mine is: AbsoluteUrl(this UrlHelper url, string relativeUrl). –  Rob Kent Nov 30 '11 at 16:41
1  
I prefer this answer, cos it makes my code more readable. –  Marvin Rounce Jan 19 '13 at 17:19
<%= Url.Action("About", "Home", null, Request.Url.Scheme) %>
<%= Url.RouteUrl("Default", new { Action = "About" }, Request.Url.Scheme) %>
share|improve this answer
    
This worked very well for me - thanks –  Jaco Pretorius Aug 15 '11 at 14:28

Using @Charlino 's answer as a guide, I came up with this.

The ASP.NET MVC documentation for UrlHelper shows that Url.Action will return a fully-qualified Url if a hostname and protocol are passed in. I created these helpers to force the hostname and protocol to be provided. The multiple overloads mirror the overloads for Url.Action:

using System.Web.Routing;

namespace System.Web.Mvc {
    public static class HtmlExtensions {

        public static string AbsoluteAction(this UrlHelper url, string actionName) {
            Uri requestUrl = url.RequestContext.HttpContext.Request.Url;
            return url.Action(actionName, null, (RouteValueDictionary)null, requestUrl.Scheme, null);
            }
        public static string AbsoluteAction(this UrlHelper url, string actionName, object routeValues) {
            Uri requestUrl = url.RequestContext.HttpContext.Request.Url;
            return url.Action(actionName, null, new RouteValueDictionary(routeValues), requestUrl.Scheme, null);
            }
        public static string AbsoluteAction(this UrlHelper url, string actionName, RouteValueDictionary routeValues) {
            Uri requestUrl = url.RequestContext.HttpContext.Request.Url;
            return url.Action(actionName, null, routeValues, requestUrl.Scheme, null);
            }
        public static string AbsoluteAction(this UrlHelper url, string actionName, string controllerName) {
            Uri requestUrl = url.RequestContext.HttpContext.Request.Url;
            return url.Action(actionName, controllerName, (RouteValueDictionary)null, requestUrl.Scheme, null);
            }
        public static string AbsoluteAction(this UrlHelper url, string actionName, string controllerName, object routeValues) {
            Uri requestUrl = url.RequestContext.HttpContext.Request.Url;
            return url.Action(actionName, controllerName, new RouteValueDictionary(routeValues), requestUrl.Scheme, null);
            }
        public static string AbsoluteAction(this UrlHelper url, string actionName, string controllerName, RouteValueDictionary routeValues) {
            Uri requestUrl = url.RequestContext.HttpContext.Request.Url;
            return url.Action(actionName, controllerName, routeValues, requestUrl.Scheme, null);
            }
        public static string AbsoluteAction(this UrlHelper url, string actionName, string controllerName, object routeValues, string protocol) {
            Uri requestUrl = url.RequestContext.HttpContext.Request.Url;
            return url.Action(actionName, controllerName, new RouteValueDictionary(routeValues), protocol, null);
            }

        }
    }
share|improve this answer
4  
Thx for the code, helped me a lot, but there is an issue with this solution that usually comes up during development. If the site is hosted on a specific port, the port information is included in requestUrl.Authority, like localhost:4423. For some reason the Action method appends the port again. So either this is a bug inside the Action Method or you are not supposed to supply the port here. But which of the available Properties on the request is the right one (DnsSafeHost or Host)? Well the solution is rather simple: Just supply null and the Action method will fill in the right value. –  ntziolis Sep 14 '10 at 15:56
    
Ooh, best answer here –  eouw0o83hf Mar 5 '12 at 21:30
    
I've updated the answer to incorporate @ntziolis's suggestion. –  Andrew Arnott Sep 22 '12 at 20:59

I'm not sure if there is a built in way to do it, but you could roll your own HtmlHelper method.

Something like the following

namespace System.Web.Mvc
{
    public static class HtmlExtensions
    {
        public static string AbsoluteAction(this HtmlHelper html, string actionUrl)
        {
            Uri requestUrl = html.ViewContext.HttpContext.Request.Url;

            string absoluteAction = string.Format("{0}://{1}{2}",
                                                  requestUrl.Scheme,
                                                  requestUrl.Authority,
                                                  actionUrl);

            return absoluteAction;
        }
    }
}

Then call it like this

<%= Html.AbsoluteAction(Url.Action("Dashboard", "Account"))%> »

HTHs, Charles

share|improve this answer

Same result but a little cleaner (no string concatenation/formatting):

public static Uri GetBaseUrl(this UrlHelper url)
{
    Uri contextUri = new Uri(url.RequestContext.HttpContext.Request.Url, url.RequestContext.HttpContext.Request.RawUrl);
    UriBuilder realmUri = new UriBuilder(contextUri) { Path = url.RequestContext.HttpContext.Request.ApplicationPath, Query = null, Fragment = null };
    return realmUri.Uri;
}

public static string ActionAbsolute(this UrlHelper url, string actionName, string controllerName)
{
    return new Uri(GetBaseUrl(url), url.Action(actionName, controllerName)).AbsoluteUri;
}
share|improve this answer

Maybe this (?):

<%= 
  Request.Url.GetLeftPart(UriPartial.Authority) + 
  Url.Action("Action1", "Controller2", new {param1="bla", param2="blabla" })
%>
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.