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I have simple text file loaded into memory. I want to read from memory just like I would read from a disc like here:

ifstream file;
string line;

file.open("C:\\file.txt");
if(file.is_open())
{
    while(file.good())
    {
        getline(file,line);         
    }
}   
file.close();

But I have file in memory. I have an address in memory and a size of this file.

What I must do to have the same fluency as with dealing with file in the code above?

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See: how-to-read-file-content-into-istringstream and [simpler-way-to-create-a-c-memorystream-from-char-size-t-without-copying-th](htt‌​p://stackoverflow.com/questions/2079912/simpler-way-to-create-a-c-memorystream-fr‌​om-char-size-t-without-copying-th/2080048#2080048) –  Loki Astari Dec 3 '10 at 16:26

6 Answers 6

You can do something like the following..

std::istringstream str;
str.rdbuf()->pubsetbuf(<buffer>,<size of buffer>);

And then use it in your getline calls...

NOTE: getline does not understand dos/unix difference, so the \r is included in the text, which is why I chomp it!

  char buffer[] = "Hello World!\r\nThis is next line\r\nThe last line";  
  istringstream str;
  str.rdbuf()->pubsetbuf(buffer, sizeof(buffer));
  string line;
  while(getline(str, line))
  {
    // chomp the \r as getline understands \n
    if (*line.rbegin() == '\r') line.erase(line.end() - 1);
    cout << "line:[" << line << "]" << endl;
  }
share|improve this answer
    
That's what I'm looking for! Where to put this address and size in istringstream. But it doesn't work with getline... I checked this buffer and it's array of chars and new line is "\r\n" windows style. So the buffer is ok. I don't know what to do to get this lines. –  Mariusz Pawelski Dec 3 '10 at 14:42
    
Edited with code.. –  Nim Dec 3 '10 at 15:09
1  
One problem with this code: It's not guaranteed to work. The effect of pubsetbuf on basic_streambuf is "implementation-defined". Also it expects a non-const pointer, so it may modify the pointed data on putback. –  ybungalobill Dec 3 '10 at 19:23
    
@ybungalobill: Wrong, Correct and Correct on both points. But still irrelevant. pubsetbuf (called by setbuf) <quote>This is a virtual member function that shall be redefined in derived classes to behave as expected by setting the array of n characters pointed by s as the new character buffer.</quote> Emphasis added. So yes it is implementation defined how it works (but implementation defined does not mean it will not work), it should work as expected. So what if putback modifies the buffer! we are passing a modifiable array in so that should not be a problem. –  Loki Astari Dec 3 '10 at 20:05
1  
@CichyK24: It is not supposed to work. It's not guaranteed by the standard. See stackoverflow.com/questions/4349778/… for details. So the best thing you can do if you don't want to copy and want to use it as a source for a stream, is to use boost. –  ybungalobill Dec 3 '10 at 23:09

Use boost.Iostreams. Specifically basic_array.

namespace io = boost::iostreams;

io::filtering_istream in;
in.push(array_source(array, arraySize));
// use in
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Functionality already supported by the STL so no need to use boost. –  Loki Astari Dec 3 '10 at 16:29
1  
Martin, can you explain your way of use an array as streambuf besides copying to stringstream? –  Basilevs Dec 3 '10 at 18:10
    
@Martin: STL doesn't have anything for that, without making a copy of the data. Nim's solution looked nice, but unfortunately looking at the standard I see that it's at most "implementation defined". –  ybungalobill Dec 3 '10 at 19:25
    
pubsetbuf (called by setbuf) <quote>This is a virtual member function that shall be redefined in derived classes to behave as expected by setting the array of n characters pointed by s as the new character buffer.</quote> Emphasis added. So yes it is implementation defined how it works, but it should work as expected. –  Loki Astari Dec 3 '10 at 20:02
    
@Martin: it's character buffer, it's expected to be used for buffering for reading and writing to/from files, sockets, keyboard, screen, etc... It's not expected to be used as a source of data. The standard doesn't say that any of the stream should retain the data that was there initially. –  ybungalobill Dec 3 '10 at 20:05

You can use istringstream for that.

string text = "text...";
istringstream file(text);
string line;

while(file.good())
{
    getline(file,line);         
}
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did you mean (i)stringstream? –  Chubsdad Dec 3 '10 at 14:06
    
IIRC istrstream was deprecated. –  Matteo Italia Dec 3 '10 at 14:08
1  
This requires the data to be copied from the string, into the stringstream buffer. So the Boost solution suggested by @ybungalobill is going to be faster, but this solution will work, and it doesn't depend on external libraries. –  jalf Dec 3 '10 at 15:10
    
Your idea is basically the same as Nim. But this veriant actually creates a copy of the data from text into file. Thus if text is huge (like the content of a file this may be a problem). –  Loki Astari Dec 3 '10 at 16:28
up vote 2 down vote accepted

I found a solution that works on VC++ since Nim solution works only on GCC compiler (big thanks, though. Thanks to your answer I found other answers which helped me!).

It seems that other people have similar problem too. I did exactly as here and here.

So to read from a piece of memory just like form a istream you have to do this:

class membuf : public streambuf
{
    public:
        membuf(char* p, size_t n) {
        setg(p, p, p + n);
    }
};

int main()
{
    char buffer[] = "Hello World!\nThis is next line\nThe last line";  
    membuf mb(buffer, sizeof(buffer));

    istream istr(&mb);
    string line;
    while(getline(istr, line))
    {
        cout << "line:[" << line << "]" << endl;
    }
}

EDIT: And if you have '\r\n' new lines do as Nim wrote:

if (*line.rbegin() == '\r') line.erase(line.end() - 1);

I'm trying to treat this memory as as wistream. Does anybody know how to do this? I asked separate question for this.

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The question is: why reinvent the wheel? I wasn't using boost for the exact same reason as you "I don't like adding other library just for this 'simple' task", until I realized that I just wasted my time. Someone have already written all these 'simple' tasks. Boost is available on almost any professional C++ programmer's computer, and 'adding' it to your programs is as simple as 'adding' the standard library. –  ybungalobill Dec 10 '10 at 9:19
    
I'm writing IE add-on and efficiency there is crucial so it won't pop out a window that suggesting disabling it because it's slow. If I were writing 'normal' application of course I wouldn't mind any external libraries :) –  Mariusz Pawelski Dec 11 '10 at 12:09
    
what makes you think that boost will make your program slower? Boost links to your app statically and as efficient as your hand-crafted code. –  ybungalobill Dec 11 '10 at 18:18

Use

std::stringstream

It has an interface to manipulate and read strings just like other streams.

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Here's how I would do it:

#include <sstream>

std::istringstream stream("some textual value");
std::string line;
while (std::getline(stream, line)) {
    // do something with line
}

Hope this helps!

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